Q & A: Spray Paint Help

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by nathanalaneller, Apr 13, 2015.

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  1. nathanalaneller

    nathanalaneller Well-Known Member

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    Q & A Spray Paint Help

    I was spray painting & had allot of questions.
    Q: How to dry a spray paint?
    A: ?
    Q: How long dose paint dry for different types of surface, plastics, wood.
    A: ?
    Q: Is their a spray to make the paint dry quicker?
    A: ?
    Q: How do you keep fingerprints off your project.
    A: ?
    Manly if their are questions or answers to how to spray paint a project, I'd like to know.
    So if you have a question, or you have an answer, for one of anyone's questions that will be asked on this thread. Please, let it be known.

    "ASK YOUR QUESTIONS AND THEY WILL COME" :D
     
  2. geekswoodshop

    geekswoodshop New Member

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    For avoiding fingerprints, wear latex or other thin gloves, for other questions I super highly recommend Volpin Props book on weathering. It's an amazing amount of info for low price. He goes into much deeper info, but one of the important things he emphasizes is to read the small print on the back, and be very careful about mixing types of paint, acrylic, lacquer, enamel, to test a lot. I wish I knew specifics about various paints, but still learning.
     
  3. Gixxerfool

    Gixxerfool Well-Known Member

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    Re: Q & A: Spray Paint Help

    What geekswoodshop said. I tore through it in a day. The info is really helpful. I knew some of the stuff but learned so much more. I have been meaning to looking into printing it so i can have it handy for reference. Volpin achieves some impressive results with a rattle can.

    - - - Updated - - -

    What geekswoodshop said. I tore through it in a day. The info is really helpful. I knew some of the stuff but learned so much more. I have been meaning to looking into printing it so i can have it handy for reference. Volpin achieves some impressive results with a rattle can.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  4. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 Master Member

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    Okay, here's a question: Why is everyone always in such a big * hurry? Paint takes as long as it takes to dry, as does primer, putty, bondo, glue, and so on. Once you accept that as a fact of this hobby, you'll learn to enjoy it more, be less stressed out, and make fewer mistakes that will take even more time to correct.

    Q: How to dry a spray paint?
    A: Set the painted item aside in a warm, dry area (preferably indoors so you don't have to worry about wind blowing dust or other contaminants onto the wet paint) and just let it dry. I set my freshly painted project(s) aside for at least 24 hours to give the paint a chance to dry/cure thoroughly.

    Q: How long dose paint dry for different types of surface, plastics, wood?
    A: In my experience it depends more on the paint and the environment (i.e., temperature and humidity) than the materials you're using. As has been suggested, read the label on the can or bottle--the manufacturer will likely have included some form of instructions regarding the amount of time necessary for their product to dry thoroughly.

    Q: Is their a spray to make the paint dry quicker?
    A: No. None that I'm aware of, anyway.

    Q: How do you keep fingerprints off your project?
    A: Don't touch it. :D But seriously, if you use rubber gloves as has been suggested, and allow the paint adequate time to fully dry/cure, fingerprints shouldn't be a problem.


    That said, I've been building model kits for more than 40 years now, and have always used spray paint; I've never even held an airbrush, let alone used one. As such, here are some of the things I've learned:

    • Before you paint, make sure the surface of the material you're painting is clean and dry. If you think it's necessary, wash it with warm water and dish soap or a liquid cleanser like Simple Green. And make sure you've rinsed the material thoroughly to remove any dish soap or liquid cleanser residue; use a soft brush (an old toothbrush works fine for me) to scrub the material/parts if necessary. If you're concerned about contamination after cleaning, wear rubber gloves when you're handling the material.

    • Paint in an area that is well-lit and has adequate ventilation; paint fumes and particulates aren't good for your lungs. If necessary, wear a mask or respirator.

    • Make sure the item you're painting is secured in position. Not only does it suck to have something fall over while you're trying to paint it, but it can ruin any paint you've already applied which will likely mean you'll have to strip the paint and start over.

    • Read the label on the can, and follow the manufacturer's recommendations with regards to ambient temperature and humidity. If they advise using their paint at temperatures above 70°F, don't use them if it's 60°F.

    • Regardless of whether you're using primer, paint, or clear coat, warm the can before you start spraying. Every time. I soak mine in a bucket of hot tap water for 5-10 minutes; it just has to be warmer than room temperature, not boiling. And if I don't think I'll be using the entire can, I place it inside of a plastic bag first so that the water won't cause the can to rust. Now, the reason for this is that the heat makes the primer/paint slightly less viscous--it flows out of the can easier and lays down on the surface of whatever you're painting better, resulting in a better-looking final product.

    • Shake the can before you spray. A lot. This mixes the carrier and the paint particulates. And shake it again every 30-60 seconds while painting.

    • Spray in light, misting coats. Don't try to cover the material with one coat, build it up slowly with several light applications. If you miss a small spot, cover it with the next coat or two. Some manufacturers will include instructions on the label that indicate how much time should elapse between coats, usually something like "Paint subsequent coats within 1 hour, or after 24 hours," and you'll usually get the best results by following their recommendations.

    • Keep the can moving while you're spraying--never, ever, ever hold the can in one spot. Also, don't hold the can too close to whatever you're painting. The exact distance is subjective, but I've found 6-8" usually works for me; sometimes a little less, sometimes a little more.

    • After the final coat--yes, I'm going to say it again--let the paint dry. If you start poking at it before it's dry, you'll probably leave fingerprints in the still-wet paint and have to strip or sand the project and paint it all over again, losing whatever time you thought you were gaining by being impatient.

    That's all I can think of for now; I hope someone finds it helpful.
     
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  5. funboy1013xx

    funboy1013xx Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    try to stick with the same brands also. I use krylon primers with krylon paints, or rustoleum etc. these 2 are my MAIN R.C. paints. take a look at my RED PLANET helmet build pic's and you can see the results....and that helmet was painted in the dead of winter on my open patio. then moved inside to cure 24 hrs. the new krylon MAXX clear coats are friggin AWESOME!
     
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  6. Gixxerfool

    Gixxerfool Well-Known Member

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    While we're on the subject,does anyone have any suggestions for the off gassing of painted parts? I spray them outside but then bring them in. As they dry they stink the house up something fierce.
     
  7. Exterminator

    Exterminator Active Member

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    Zombie_61 and funboy1013xx make some valid points - certainly don't mix paint brands, I've had "issues" in the past where I've used two brands of what was supposed to be the same type of paint, and there's been a reaction. Lots of fun scraping all the paint off and re-doing everything!

    On the issue of touching stuff, please DON'T believe the spray paints that say something like "Touch-dry in 10 minutes!" or whatever, I would be very wary of touching anything I've sprayed for at least 24 hours. Before spraying, always try and fix the thing you're spraying to either a "stick", a flat piece of thick card or wire (depending on what shape and/or size it is). This means you can put it down (or hang it up) somewhere, and you'll be able to move it before the paint has dried. Again, something I've done before, spraying something like a hemisphere, you can hold it inside while you spray it, and you can edge it on to a flat surface, but there's no way of picking it up again!

    Finally, when using cans, always spray in thin coats, do not worry about getting the final finish you require on the first "go". What can happen with a single, heavy application of paint (especially with glossy paint and clear coats) is that the very top layer dries and forms a surface "skin", while everything below it remains wet. Touch that, even after 24 hours or so, and it's "fingerprint city"!!
     
  8. horus

    horus Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I read the replies with interest and realised I am spraying to heavy and not waiting long enough for it to dry.
     
  9. nathanalaneller

    nathanalaneller Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for that inspiring info.

    Here's another question I mention. Q: How long dose paint dry for different types of surface, plastics, wood.

    I tried painting a vinyl aquarium tube for one of my projects & the paint is sill tacky after several weeks. How do I get around that? :confused
     
  10. Indy Magnoli

    Indy Magnoli Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I'll throw this out there: if you're doing something on the quick and plan on distressing anyway, you can use baby powder on spray painted surfaces after a few minutes airdrying. The powder adheres to the parts that are still wet giving you an almost "instant dry". It will give you a "softer" tone but if you're going to distress anyway it won't make a difference. I've used this trick many times when I was doing a rush, last minute job. I liked the results so much that I sometimes use it even when I have time for drying...
     
  11. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 Master Member

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    Re: Q & A: Spray Paint Help

    Vinyl is a pain-in-the-you-know-what when it comes to paint.

    First, never ever use enamel paint on bare vinyl; a chemical reaction between the vinyl and the solvent-based carriers used for enamel paints prevents them from curing. You must use water-based/acrylic paints on bare vinyl. However, if you must use enamel paint for any reason, you can coat the bare vinyl with an acrylic primer first.

    Second, in my experience some vinyls simply won't accept paint. Period. No matter what you do. You can soak the vinyl in degreaser for a week, sand the surface thoroughly, prime the surface well with an acrylic primer, and the primer/paint will still flake off when the vinyl is flexed. Even if the primer/paint is specifically formulated for use on vinyl. Vinyl sucks.

    At this point, I'd suggest you replace that vinyl aquarium tube with something else because that paint will never dry thoroughly. You can try stripping the paint and trying again with a paint specifically designed for use on vinyl, but...
     
  12. geekswoodshop

    geekswoodshop New Member

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    This is a very useful thread, thanks for the insights, all.

    Indi Magnoli: You talk about using baby powder to fast dry when heavy weathering. I've not heard of this, any other insights you can share? Are you talking about the primer coat or some of the actual color coats before doing heavy weathering? Sounds like something to experiment with for certain applications. Any examples?

    As far as mixing brands, anyone have strong preference for Krylon vs Rustoleum or other brands and why? In a seminar on Smooth-On casting a few months back, one of the comments was that they have seen some poor reactions with some of their products when casting over a Rustoleum paint job. Don't know if anyone else has seen that sort of thing. In general around here, these two as well as Dupi-color seem to be common. funboy1013xx recommended Krylon in this thread, any other personal preferences from experience?
     
  13. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 Master Member

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    Re: Q & A: Spray Paint Help

    As I mentioned above, I've been building model kits for more than 40 years, so that's my main hobby. As such, I grew up using primarily Testors paints, and I still prefer enamel paints over acrylics because I believe they leave a better finish and are far more durable, but I'll use whichever type and brand has the color closest to what I need. I've used Pactra, Testors, Tamiya, Krylon, Rustoleum, and others that I can't recall at the moment, and I've never really had problems with any of them.

    If anyone has concerns about using different types of paints and/or paint interactions from different manufacturers, the best thing to do is to try them on something other than your project first, preferably on the same material your project is made from. Scrap material is your friend. :D

    Edit: Off topic, but is anyone else having problems with a pop-up that asks if you want to leave the page when you try to post, then duplicates your post when you select "Leave page"? This has been happening to me for a few days now, and it's getting annoying.
     
  14. thd9791

    thd9791 Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A tip for smaller parts - use decent gauged wire to wrap though a hole in your project. Maybe there's a screw or a ring going through part of your project - loop some wire through and use that as a handle. Either for spraying coats or hanging to dry. The idea here is that you don't spray too much - if you go heavy on the spray it will drip and dry that way.

    I was told, light spray - 6-8 inches away - make passes starting off the item, and ending off the item so you don't miss anything. Be methodical and patient.
     

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  15. DRG

    DRG Active Member

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    Re: Q & A: Spray Paint Help

    Another thing I always do, especially when dealing with a new type of surface or paint is ample testing. Get small scraps pieces of the materials and paints you're working with and do tests. Granted this requires patience... I've learned it's best to do paint tests while I'm still working on other elements of my build. That way I'm not as tempted to rush in and start painting like crazy.

    Also, humidity is the devil.

    That sort of vinyl just doesn't seem to stick to paint well. You could try to scuff the surface a bit with sandpaper to get a better grip for the paint, but it still might not be enough. And if the paint is not even drying on it you'll have to try a different type of paint... usually it will just dry and chip off of a surface like that.
     
  16. E Williams

    E Williams Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Get a $10 humidity gauge from wal-mart or wherever and put it in your painting area. This plays a huge factor in the curing of your paint - whether it hazes up, how quickly it cures, if it cures properly at all. Read the spray can for the maximum humidity and check your gauge - generally if it's within 10% of the maximum, I don't paint until the relative humidity drops. You may have to wait a day or several, but it's better than having to scrap the project and start over!
     
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  17. ahoudini

    ahoudini Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Q & A: Spray Paint Help

    These are worth their weight in gold if you do a lot of rattle can spray painting:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0055S7DJS/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_rAcmvb09HHRJY

    It fits on a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) like any other blade but has a ratcheting strap to secure the rattle can. Pull the trigger and it shakes your paint for you. I mounted a cheap harbor freight saw to the side of my paint booth, zip tied down the trigger and plugged the saw into a switched power strip. Now when you flip the switch the shaker comes on. 60 seconds later, you are ready to paint. I also connected a desktop coffee mug warmer to a timer switch (like on a motel heat lamp) and use it to warm the paint before I shake it. That way, you can't forget and leave it on. The can sits in a metal dog bowl of water which sits on the mug warmer.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015

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