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Peter Parke 67

New Member
Hi, I am making my very first cosplay so I don't really have any experience at this point. I chose the amazing spider-man 2 suit to make a perfect replica of but I don't know where to start. I've seen a lot of people on the internet attempting to do so but even tho they love it, the suit is clearly not that great compared to the movie, (even tho some people like spiderlabs have made perfect copys). they always have the color off and the texture doesn't look the same. So here are my questions to help me make the perfect suit. please keep in mind that I want to make it as accuarte to the movie as possible but it's not gonna be a one time use suit.
1. what is the best material that also have the same shiny(I think it's shiny) texture of the movie.

2. how do get the color to look right? especially the red that looks really dark. Also I think the suit has a kind of shadow printed on but am not sure.

3. how do I make the webbing? Keep in mind that it's not a one time use suit so it has to be a durable webbing.

4.where can I find a good pattern file that's accuarte and Don't have the back piece in half. I absolutely hate the sewing line in the back so I want a pattern with the back in a single piece.

5. Am not very familiar with cosplay so can someone please explain the different types of fabric and the printing technique. I heard termed like "dye sub" or "screen printed" but I don't anything about them. Some will tell me to use google but am looking to understand how they affect my costume and which one is better depending on the situation rather than their mere definition.

6. Last thing, do anyone have a link to a video/ article that's talk about the making of the original suit used by the andrew in the movies?

Thank you and all help will be greatly appreciated!
 

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Peter Parke 67

New Member
Hi, I am making my very first cosplay so I don't really have any experience at this point. I chose the amazing spider-man 2 suit to make a perfect replica of but I don't know where to start. I've seen a lot of people on the internet attempting to do so but even tho they love it, the suit is clearly not that great compared to the movie, (even tho some people like spiderlabs have made perfect copys). they always have the color off and the texture doesn't look the same. So here are my questions to help me make the perfect suit. please keep in mind that I want to make it as accuarte to the movie as possible but it's not gonna be a one time use suit.

1. What is the best material that also have the same shiny(I think it's shiny) texture of the movie.


2. How do get the color to look right? especially the red that looks really dark. Also I think the suit has a kind of shadow printed on but am not sure.


3. How do I make the webbing? Keep in mind that it's not a one time use suit so it has to be a durable webbing.


4. Where can I find a good pattern file that's accuarte and Don't have the back piece in half. I absolutely hate the sewing line in the back so I want a pattern with the back in a single piece.


5. Am not very familiar with cosplay so can someone please explain the different types of fabric and the printing technique. I heard termed like "dye sub" or "screen printed" but I don't anything about them. Some will tell me to use google but am looking to understand how they affect my costume and which one is better depending on the situation rather than their mere definition.


6. Last thing, do anyone have a link to a video/ article that's talk about the making of the original suit used by the andrew in the movies?


Thank you and all help will be greatly appreciated!
 

Funky

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
To even get CLOSE to something that looks screen used your looking at a minimum of spending $2,000.00. I just wanted to prepare you before going down this rabbit hole.
 

Peter Parke 67

New Member
To even get CLOSE to something that looks screen used your looking at a minimum of spending $2,000.00. I just wanted to prepare you before going down this rabbit hole.
Spider labs made one that look identical to the movie but he didn't seem to have spent that much
 

masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I would agree with Funky - movie-accurate Spidey suits can get expensive quick!

A lot of the muscle shading you see is dye sublimation on 4-way Lycra. To get the colors right, you really need separate red and blue fabric.

The raised webs are cast, which means modeling, mold making, and casting. A lot of folks will go the puff paint route to keep costs down, but puff paint doesn’t necessarily meet the ”durable webbing” you’re looking for.

Sean
 

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Peter Parke 67

New Member
Quick Update, So I finally settled a Peter B Parker suit from into the spider-verse. It's my best movie accuarte option while still being affordable. I already have an idea for the jacket But haven't found something a bit cheaper for the lenses and face shell. Any recommendations for cheap options? Or can just not buy a faceshell?


Ps: I did NOT give up on making my own suit. It's just that I have to accept that I can't do a satisfying one with my current budget. I will build my own at some point and when that happens I'll make a post about it. In the meantime, I'll practice making my own digital patterns on photoshop and maybe make some homemade suits with some piece of fabric I have
 

gundammrw

New Member
For faceshells, decent ones look to be going for $100-200 on etsy. Some cheaper ones on ebay but those look to be from China or mexico and that can be a slippery slope.

Alternatively you can try to the DIY foam or cardboard templates. You would need to make it your self and quality might be the same quality as a printer/cast shell you can buy.
 

TheNickFox

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hi, I am making my very first cosplay so I don't really have any experience at this point. I chose the amazing spider-man 2 suit to make a perfect replica of but I don't know where to start. I've seen a lot of people on the internet attempting to do so but even tho they love it, the suit is clearly not that great compared to the movie, (even tho some people like spiderlabs have made perfect copys). they always have the color off and the texture doesn't look the same. So here are my questions to help me make the perfect suit. please keep in mind that I want to make it as accuarte to the movie as possible but it's not gonna be a one time use suit.
1. what is the best material that also have the same shiny(I think it's shiny) texture of the movie.

2. how do get the color to look right? especially the red that looks really dark. Also I think the suit has a kind of shadow printed on but am not sure.

3. how do I make the webbing? Keep in mind that it's not a one time use suit so it has to be a durable webbing.

4.where can I find a good pattern file that's accuarte and Don't have the back piece in half. I absolutely hate the sewing line in the back so I want a pattern with the back in a single piece.

5. Am not very familiar with cosplay so can someone please explain the different types of fabric and the printing technique. I heard termed like "dye sub" or "screen printed" but I don't anything about them. Some will tell me to use google but am looking to understand how they affect my costume and which one is better depending on the situation rather than their mere definition.

6. Last thing, do anyone have a link to a video/ article that's talk about the making of the original suit used by the andrew in the movies?

Thank you and all help will be greatly appreciated!
Like others have said, this is an expensive and/or time consuming endeavor. I've been at Spidey costumes for 17 years and I still haven't made the "definitive" costume for me yet. But I'll do my best to address your questions because it's what I would have wanted when I was getting started.

First, though, The Amazing Spider Labs spends A LOT to make their suits as good as they are and they are a multi-person team highly specialized and with access to original costume pieces. They may make it look cheap or easy, but I promise there's tons of work involved.

Now onto your questions:

1. Milliskin Lycra or Nylon Tricot are common materials used for stretch suits. Both are available in matte and shiny varieties, and sometimes even speciality varieties that REALLY shine. (That last one wouldn't be accurate)

2. The fact of the matter is: it takes time, experimentation, luck, and access to good resources. The TASM2 suit is made with colored fabrics, so either you need to source a close fabric or spend time finding a way to dye it yourself... and synthetic materials tend to be much more difficult to dye than natural ones. Which means it will take experimentation. So, finding a fabric in the color is a better choice.

The "Shadow" you are talking about is the screen printed brick pattern that covers the suit.

3. As far as I know, the webbing for the suit is a specialty silk screen technique done with a custom blended ink and additives which are proprietary to the shop that printed them. A more adorable option is to make them with puff paint by hand. Puff paint isn't stretchy and will eventually crack though so just know that.

4. Various pattern makers have made variations on the pattern. Mclean is the guy you want for TASM2: MadebyMcLean

The pattern is very complicated to sew and most shops (like Herostime and Printcostume won't sew his work because it's too complex). So you'll either need to sew it yourself requiring access to a Serger and skill or a seamstress. The latter will have to be instructed explicitly since the pattern will likely be unlike she has ever sewn. I have worked with very skilled Seamstresses who screwed up multiple prints of mine. You may want to consider a pattern by a different pattern maker that a Herostime or PrintCostume can sew for you for simplicity's sake. 4Neo Designs and Brandon Gilbert are the two that are most well known. See if they offer a TASM2 pattern.

5. Dye sublimation is a process where a solid dye is printed onto a special paper and vaporized INTO the fabric dying the fabric.

Screen Printing is when ink (not dye) is applied ON TOP of the fabric, through multiple screens that must be custom made for each and every piece. A simple version of Screen Printing is actually shown in TASM1 when Peter is making the "real" suit. The actual process is much more complicated requiring a lot of knowledge and time.

Neither is better or worse. They're good for different things.

Dye Sub is better for intricate patterns and things with lots of different shades and shadows that need to look like they are part of the fabric.

Screen printing is better for dimensional designs that need to sit on top of the fabric. Speciality inks additives can make the inks puffy, or stretchy or shiny, or color changing. So it's for highly specialized purposes, and it is what is used by most superhero costumes in movies nowadays, including the TASM1 and 2 suits. The only real notable movies that DIDN'T use screen printing were Spider-Man 2 and 3, where they switched from screen printing to dye sub to save money and time. Dye sub is faster and cheaper.

6. Welcome to the fun of costume making: Research. You can study a costume for years and still discover new things, but you have to do the legwork. I promise it's fun, even addictive. Start a folder on your computer called "Reference" and subfolders for all the costumes you want to make, the start tracking down those pictures and videos and saving them to those folders.

Happy making!
 
Last edited:

Peter Parke 67

New Member
Like others have said, this is an expensive and/or time consuming endeavor. I've been at Spidey costumes for 17 years and I still haven't made the "definitive" costume for me yet. But I'll do my best to address your questions because it's what I would have wanted when I was getting started.

First, though, The Amazing Spider Labs spends A LOT to make their suits as good as they are and they are a multi-person team highly specialized and with access to original costume pieces. They may make it look cheap or easy, but I promise there's tons of work involved.

Now onto your questions:

1. Milliskin Lycra or Nylon Tricot are common materials used for stretch suits. Both are available in matte and shiny varieties, and sometimes even speciality varieties that REALLY shine. (That last one wouldn't be accurate)

2. The fact of the matter is: it takes time, experimentation, luck, and access to good resources. The TASM2 suit is made with colored fabrics, so either you need to source a close fabric or spend time finding a way to dye it yourself... and synthetic materials tend to be much more difficult to dye than natural ones. Which means it will take experimentation. So, finding a fabric in the color is a better choice.

The "Shadow" you are talking about is the screen printed brick pattern that covers the suit.

3. As far as I know, the webbing for the suit is a specialty silk screen technique done with a custom blended ink and additives which are proprietary to the shop that printed them. A more adorable option is to make them with puff paint by hand. Puff paint isn't stretchy and will eventually crack though so just know that.

4. Various pattern makers have made variations on the pattern. Mclean is the guy you want for TASM2: MadebyMcLean

The pattern is very complicated to sew and most shops (like Herostime and Printcostume won't sew his work because it's too complex). So you'll either need to sew it yourself requiring access to a Serger and skill or a seamstress. The latter will have to be instructed explicitly since the pattern will likely be unlike she has ever sewn. I have worked with very skilled Seamstresses who screwed up multiple prints of mine. You may want to consider a pattern by a different pattern maker that a Herostime or PrintCostume can sew for you for simplicity's sake. 4Neo Designs and Brandon Gilbert are the two that are most well known. See if they offer a TASM2 pattern.

5. Dye sublimation is a process where a solid dye is printed onto a special paper and vaporized INTO the fabric dying the fabric.

Screen Printing is when ink (not dye) is applied ON TOP of the fabric, through multiple screens that must be custom made for each and every piece. A simple version of Screen Printing is actually shown in TASM1 when Peter is making the "real" suit. The actual process is much more complicated requiring a lot of knowledge and time.

Neither is better or worse. They're good for different things.

Dye Sub is better for intricate patterns and things with lots of different shades and shadows that need to look like they are part of the fabric.

Screen printing is better for dimensional designs that need to sit on top of the fabric. Speciality inks additives can make the inks puffy, or stretchy or shiny, or color changing. So it's for highly specialized purposes, and it is what is used by most superhero costumes in movies nowadays, including the TASM1 and 2 suits. The only real notable movies that DIDN'T use screen printing were Spider-Man 2 and 3, where they switched from screen printing to dye sub to save money and time. Dye sub is faster and cheaper.

6. Welcome to the fun of costume making: Research. You can study a costume for years and still discover new things, but you have to do the legwork. I promise it's fun, even addictive. Start a folder on your computer called "Reference" and subfolders for all the costumes you want to make, the start tracking down those pictures and videos and saving them to those folders.

Happy making!
thx mate. I actually chatted with a member of the amazing spider lab and he referred me to a person he got an original piece of fabric from so for now I'll try to contact him and see what he have.
 

Peter Parke 67

New Member
Like others have said, this is an expensive and/or time consuming endeavor. I've been at Spidey costumes for 17 years and I still haven't made the "definitive" costume for me yet. But I'll do my best to address your questions because it's what I would have wanted when I was getting started.

First, though, The Amazing Spider Labs spends A LOT to make their suits as good as they are and they are a multi-person team highly specialized and with access to original costume pieces. They may make it look cheap or easy, but I promise there's tons of work involved.

Now onto your questions:

1. Milliskin Lycra or Nylon Tricot are common materials used for stretch suits. Both are available in matte and shiny varieties, and sometimes even speciality varieties that REALLY shine. (That last one wouldn't be accurate)

2. The fact of the matter is: it takes time, experimentation, luck, and access to good resources. The TASM2 suit is made with colored fabrics, so either you need to source a close fabric or spend time finding a way to dye it yourself... and synthetic materials tend to be much more difficult to dye than natural ones. Which means it will take experimentation. So, finding a fabric in the color is a better choice.

The "Shadow" you are talking about is the screen printed brick pattern that covers the suit.

3. As far as I know, the webbing for the suit is a specialty silk screen technique done with a custom blended ink and additives which are proprietary to the shop that printed them. A more adorable option is to make them with puff paint by hand. Puff paint isn't stretchy and will eventually crack though so just know that.

4. Various pattern makers have made variations on the pattern. Mclean is the guy you want for TASM2: MadebyMcLean

The pattern is very complicated to sew and most shops (like Herostime and Printcostume won't sew his work because it's too complex). So you'll either need to sew it yourself requiring access to a Serger and skill or a seamstress. The latter will have to be instructed explicitly since the pattern will likely be unlike she has ever sewn. I have worked with very skilled Seamstresses who screwed up multiple prints of mine. You may want to consider a pattern by a different pattern maker that a Herostime or PrintCostume can sew for you for simplicity's sake. 4Neo Designs and Brandon Gilbert are the two that are most well known. See if they offer a TASM2 pattern.

5. Dye sublimation is a process where a solid dye is printed onto a special paper and vaporized INTO the fabric dying the fabric.

Screen Printing is when ink (not dye) is applied ON TOP of the fabric, through multiple screens that must be custom made for each and every piece. A simple version of Screen Printing is actually shown in TASM1 when Peter is making the "real" suit. The actual process is much more complicated requiring a lot of knowledge and time.

Neither is better or worse. They're good for different things.

Dye Sub is better for intricate patterns and things with lots of different shades and shadows that need to look like they are part of the fabric.

Screen printing is better for dimensional designs that need to sit on top of the fabric. Speciality inks additives can make the inks puffy, or stretchy or shiny, or color changing. So it's for highly specialized purposes, and it is what is used by most superhero costumes in movies nowadays, including the TASM1 and 2 suits. The only real notable movies that DIDN'T use screen printing were Spider-Man 2 and 3, where they switched from screen printing to dye sub to save money and time. Dye sub is faster and cheaper.

6. Welcome to the fun of costume making: Research. You can study a costume for years and still discover new things, but you have to do the legwork. I promise it's fun, even addictive. Start a folder on your computer called "Reference" and subfolders for all the costumes you want to make, the start tracking down those pictures and videos and saving them to those folders.

Happy making!
and thanks man. You gave me all the answers I needed! Currently am putting the tasm 2 project aside because am realizing how time consuming it's going to be. I decided to start working on a matt reeved The Batman armor made with eva foam
 

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TheNickFox

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
and thanks man. You gave me all the answers I needed! Currently am putting the tasm 2 project aside because am realizing how time consuming it's going to be. I decided to start working on a matt reeved The Batman armor made with eva foam
The info is all transferable. So no matter what suit you end up making, I hope it helps.

I started when I was 17 just teaching myself digital pattern making because I couldn’t afford to make a suit of my own, stick with it!

Another piece of advice: pick one costume at a time and see it through to the end. You’ll learn more by completing one project than perpetually working on 4. Lol
 

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