Toys Of Our Youth

Sluis Van Shipyards

Master Member
I think I had a few of those 80s D&D figures. I had one GI JOE sized version and some that were HeMan scale. One of the latter was a giant bee/hornet that had a wheel you would spin (like a lighter) and it would shoot sparks out of it's mouth. We lived in a newly built neighborhood so we would scour the houses being built for wood scraps and I found a perfectly circular wood disc that was maybe 2ft. in diameter. He attached some ropes and painted it black and painted a silver skull and crossbones on it. I actually think I have a picture of it somewhere.
 

dropshipbob

Sr Member
Recreate them. That would be a great project and mean something very personal to you.
That's not a bad idea, but after all this time I'm not entirely sure how they looked. And then there's the question of what to do with them....I've already got prop replicas I can't display. I should have done this years ago for my kids.
 

dropshipbob

Sr Member
I think I had a few of those 80s D&D figures. I had one GI JOE sized version and some that were HeMan scale. One of the latter was a giant bee/hornet that had a wheel you would spin (like a lighter) and it would shoot sparks out of it's mouth. We lived in a newly built neighborhood so we would scour the houses being built for wood scraps and I found a perfectly circular wood disc that was maybe 2ft. in diameter. He attached some ropes and painted it black and painted a silver skull and crossbones on it. I actually think I have a picture of it somewhere.
I only had a few D&D figures. I loved them but only had three, which I still have. I remember trying to build a small D&D type village out of cereal and shoe boxes and LEGO's. It was so woefully undermanned that I pulled out ANY figure that was even slightly able to pass as a D&D denizen. I had Star Wars figures, He-Man, just whatever would pass. It was crazy looking, but I loved it and was it ever fun to build. :)
 

Richard Baker

Sr Member
Most of my favorite childhood toys date back to the early sixties- some of them would be considered totally insane but today's enlightened parents. A couple of these have been mentioned earlier.

Jarts (or Lawn Darts) Two teams on each end of your yard, a small circle made of tubing for a target by each team and you threw these giant darts with metal spiked tips toward each other. Yes, you had a dart flying right toward you, but you moved out of the way- we were not complete morons.

Thingmaker. My best friend and I have most of the molds between us- the real challenge was to make perfect multicolored 'things' with the plastigoop. IMO the Eye was the hardest.

Chemistry Set. Real chemicals, glass test tubes, alcohol burner. Felt no need to swallow any of that stuff or shove broken glass into my eyes- that chemistry set had almost every hot button parents now worry about.

Estes/Century Solid Fuel Rockets. At the time the kits had no preworked parts- you just got a tube, balsa nose cone and fins. The real fun was just getting a bunch of parts and designing your own. They still make these rockets but they are expensive now and a lot of plastic...

Erector Set. Metal girders, plates, axles and a multi-drive motor and a lot of tiny ,machine screws and nuts. I built all sorts of things with it, from oscillating fans to a fairly good robot. I still have some of those pieces- they came in very handy when mounting car stereos.

Air Rifle. You primed it with a slide stock and when it fired it sounded real cool. I also figured out if I shoved the end into some dirt I could fire a plug about 12 feet. My parents never found out about that one.

Cap Rockets and Cap Guns. A little roll of caps just cost pennies but made a great bang. You threw the rockets which looked like little bombs, the guns were fantastic to play with. I had a couple of pistols and a machine gun looking thing which could fire a bunch in a row.

Original 12" G.I Joe - never got the big toys like the Jeep which was made to his scale, but I did make some out of cardboard. His weapon sets had wonderfully detailed guns and knives

Zoids Robots. About 7 inches tall, motorized and articulated. They moved on tank treads and had spring operated hands/claws. Realistic control panels and clear parts so you could see stuff inside them. Each one was unique, one super cool one had the ability to power accessories. Parts of them still exists as donor parts in a couple of scratch builds.

There a couple toys I forget the names of which were quite fun-
A tethered helicopter ( you held a flashlight type batter and motor with a cord attached to the helicopter a couple of feet away. You could control the speed of the blades and by tilting the handle get it to fly and navigate around the room

Metal airplanes about four inches long, I believe by Mattel. They had a metal wire clip you would put on top, string a cord through it and attached the far end to a control tower, your end had a resonator and platform for them to sit on. When you tilted them off they would make a roaring sound as the slid down the cord, by adjusting the tension you could guide them in for a good landing on their retractable wheels. Each plane looked wild, kinda like Hot Wheels cars.

A combat set which featured a helmet with drop down tinted visor and wind up mechanical bug-aliens you would hunt. Never got the whole set but while everyone else in my neighborhood was walking around with Danial Boone Coonskin caps and flintlocks, I was in my spacey looking helmet and with my air rifle.
 
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Moviefreak

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Most of my favorite childhood toys date back to the early sixties- some of them would be considered totally insane but today's enlightened parents. A couple of these have been mentioned earlier.

Jarts (or Lawn Darts) Two teams on each end of your yard, a small circle made of tubing for a target by each team and you threw these giant darts with metal spiked tips toward each other. Yes, you had a dart flying right toward you, but you moved out of the way- we were not complete morons.

Thinkmaker. My best friend and I have most of the molds between us- the real challenge was to make perfect multicolored 'things' with the plastigoop. IMO the Eye was the hardest.

Chemistry Set. Real chemicals, glass test tubes, alcohol burner. Felt no need to swallow any of that stuff or shove broken glass into my eyes- that chemistry set had almost every hot button parents now worry about.

Estes/Century Solid Fuel Rockets. At the time the kits had no preworked parts- you just got a tube, balsa nose cone and fins. The real fun was just getting a bunch of parts and designing your own. They still make these rockets but they are expensive now and a lot of plastic...

Erector Set. Metal girders, plates, axles and a multi-drive motor and a lot of tiny ,machine screws and nuts. I built all sorts of things with it, from oscillating fans to a fairly good robot. I still have some of those pieces- they came in very handy when mounting car stereos.

Air Rifle. You primed it with a slide stock and when it fired it sounded real cool. I also figured out if I shoved the end into some dirt I could fire a plug about 12 feet. My parents never found out about that one.

Cap Rockets and Cap Guns. A little roll of caps just cost pennies but made a great bang. You threw the rockets which looked like little bombs, the guns were fantastic to play with. I had a couple of pistols and a machine gun looking thing which could fire a bunch in a row.

Original 12" G.I Joe - never got the big toys like the Jeep which was made to his scale, but I did make some out of cardboard. His weapon sets had wonderfully detailed guns and knives

Zoids Robots. About 7 inches tall, motorized and articulated. They moved on tank treads and had spring operated hands/claws. Realistic control panels and clear parts so you could see stuff inside them. Each one was unique, one super cool one had the ability to power accessories. Parts of them still exists as donor parts in a couple of scratch builds.

There a couple toys I forget the names of which were quite fun-
A tethered helicopter ( you held a flashlight type batter and motor with a cord attached to the helicopter a couple of feet away. You could control the speed of the blades and by tilting the handle get it to fly and navigate around the room

Metal airplanes about four inches long, I believe by Mattel. They had a metal wire clip you would put on top, string a cord through it and attached the far end to a control tower, your end had a resonator and platform for them to sit on. When you tilted them off they would make a roaring sound as the slid down the cord, by adjusting the tension you could guide them in for a good landing on their retractable wheels. Each plane looked wild, kinda like Hot Wheels cars.

A combat set which featured a helmet with drop down tinted visor and wind up mechanical bug-aliens you would hunt. Never got the whole set but while everyone else in my neighborhood was walking around with Danial Boone Coonskin caps and flintlocks, I was in my spacey looking helmet and with my air rifle.
Now the REAL question -- how many of these do you found yourself re-buying? I made a great list of all my favorites a few years back and I have been slowly checking them off as I buy them again, lol.
 

Richard Baker

Sr Member
Now the REAL question -- how many of these do you found yourself re-buying? I made a great list of all my favorites a few years back and I have been slowly checking them off as I buy them again, lol.
Some I would love to find some of these for my kids to enjoy, more fun that the video games IMO
 

Bengrim09

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
2 of my all time favourite has to be Action Man your GI joe 12” version that I still have packed away in a suit case in my loft, they are absolutely knackered now but well played with and still loved, they had some proper outside play time when I was a young boy, fantastic memories
The other was matchbox, Dinky and corgi cars and trucks I had hundreds of them, again I had to play with them outside because of the roads I would build in the garden, it would add a touch of realism, scrap yards and crashes for the broken ones, houses and buildings out of boxes, absolutely years of fun
 

dr_slurpee

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Anyone recognize this toy? I was looking at Micro Machines on eBay and spotted this in a lot, and I know I used to have it but forget what it was from. Picture shows Micro Machines for scale reference.

46758264_10161229203175296_3097984387623419904_n.jpg
 

publiusr

Active Member
Not a toy really, but who here is old enough to remember carrying a book satchel to school? In those days back packs were only for camping and stuff.
View attachment 726611
I never could get my blasted locker to work. Quantum effects prevent my use of combination locks. I can stand there--replicate how someone else uses the combination--and--so help--me, fail even though I do the same thing.

Same with stick on the column. "You are letting the clutch out too fast...too slow!"

Sigh.

I carried all of my books--a spiral bound notebook for each class--and loose-leaf notebook, and scores of pens and pencils I found on the floor.

To this day--my left arm is stronger--even though I am right-handed.
 

Laspector

Sr Member
Had this one when I was a kid. I remember my parents bought it for me in Disneyworld around 72 or 73. Loved it!!
 

Go Flight

Active Member
My earliest memory of my favorite toy...

View attachment 849732
OMG!! I begged my Mom for months before she relented and got me the Capt.

The other toy(s) I loved were the Outer Space Men.
p1frontsmalll.jpg


I didn't know then, but if you look at them now, a lot a rip offs of various movie monsters. Hehe
You can still find them on eBay. But "In Box" the price starts at $1K. :(
.
 

dropshipbob

Sr Member
There is a company that re-released the OSM, (with the blessings and help of the original creator!) but the joints and paint are different.
 

Go Flight

Active Member
There is a company that re-released the OSM, (with the blessings and help of the original creator!) but the joints and paint are different.
Oh OK thanks. The last time I check with the creator's website (I forget his name now), he was supposedly going after some people that were trying to bootleg them. Hmm, I'll have to have a look then. Thanks.
 

pastadude

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hahaha, what an awesome thread. I remember how damn deadly those lawn darts were! My $0.02? Super Powers from Kenner.
 
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