Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

asalaw

Sr Member
I think this scene pretty well describes the Kurzman era of Star Trek.

It pains me to bring this up, but the four lights/five lights thing is boosted directly from the film version of 1984. Except it’s Richard Burton torturing John Hurt. In the book O’Brien does it with his fingers—I guess they thought lights would be more cinematic.
 

Treadwell

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
They often cheated Spock’s closeups when he was standing next to the captain’s chair, so that the background would be his bridge station instead of just the empty stage If they shot him with accurate geography.

I absolutely LOVE that stuff. Happens all the time in TOS and I much enjoy spotting it. I've learned to try to "read the room" in online discussions, however, because some people react to things like this being pointed out as disrespecting the material or "ruining" the illusion, or other such nonsense.

We did that on Star Trek Continues, such as this shot:
22713210_10214710360661307_6538481262981697258_o.jpg


In story, Smith back there is at the next station over from Spock's, which canon-ish plans name as the "Sub Systems Checkout Station". To her left is the "Defense Systems Monitor Station", which is in a part of the bridge that was never built on the STC set. So for this shot they sat her on the other side of the bridge and made sure eyelines, etc., were correct.
Red arrow points to where the camera is pointing in story. Yellow points to where it's pointing on set.
2.jpg


(the set later gained the viewscreen section, long after STC wrapped)
 

asalaw

Sr Member
I absolutely LOVE that stuff. Happens all the time in TOS and I much enjoy spotting it. I've learned to try to "read the room" in online discussions, however, because some people react to things like this being pointed out as disrespecting the material or "ruining" the illusion, or other such nonsense.

We did that on Star Trek Continues, such as this shot:
View attachment 1595154

In story, Smith back there is at the next station over from Spock's, which canon-ish plans name as the "Sub Systems Checkout Station". To her left is the "Defense Systems Monitor Station", which is in a part of the bridge that was never built on the STC set. So for this shot they sat her on the other side of the bridge and made sure eyelines, etc., were correct.
Red arrow points to where the camera is pointing in story. Yellow points to where it's pointing on set.
View attachment 1595156

(the set later gained the viewscreen section, long after STC wrapped)
Hah! Very well done. STC is the only Trek fan production I’ve seen so far that is even watchable, let alone really good, and some of them are excellent. My favorite was the Mirror, Mirror sequel. I thought it was very impressive. Obviously I haven’t seen every fan production, but so far every one I’ve seen apart from STC has been pretty much unwatchable. Apart from STC, the SW fan films have us beat hands down in terms of quality. I’ve seen some SW fan films that were uncannily good.
 

Treadwell

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
At most there would have only been two more. Nothing was written, but a couple of the ideas in the mix were 1) a musical and 2) a "A Piece of the Action" sequel. I think it probably stopped just in time. ;)
 

Gregatron

Master Member
I absolutely LOVE that stuff. Happens all the time in TOS and I much enjoy spotting it. I've learned to try to "read the room" in online discussions, however, because some people react to things like this being pointed out as disrespecting the material or "ruining" the illusion, or other such nonsense.

We did that on Star Trek Continues, such as this shot:
View attachment 1595154

In story, Smith back there is at the next station over from Spock's, which canon-ish plans name as the "Sub Systems Checkout Station". To her left is the "Defense Systems Monitor Station", which is in a part of the bridge that was never built on the STC set. So for this shot they sat her on the other side of the bridge and made sure eyelines, etc., were correct.
Red arrow points to where the camera is pointing in story. Yellow points to where it's pointing on set.
View attachment 1595156

(the set later gained the viewscreen section, long after STC wrapped)


Yes, I love all of the clever tricks used to keep a production running smoothly. Film is about the art of illusion, after all, and, when people are doing their jobs well, you really have to pay attention to catch (and appreciate) those clever little shortcuts.


Also, the fact of the matter is that the pre-CG era is much more engaging in terms of the audience asking, "How did they do that?" Sure, visual effects technology is amazing, these days, but most people will write it all off with "Computers!" as the answer to the question.

I still find Christopher Reeve ripping that practical car door off of Lois Lane's car in the first SUPERMAN movie to be more visceral and engaging than any CG slugfest in the abysmal Hack Snyder movies.



The SNW "Enterprise" can zip along like a fighter jet, and NuPike can have a cabin (be it a real set or a partial set with CG extensions) the size of Texas, but they'll never replicate the thrill of seeing the 11-foot Enterprise model zipping along in a movie-quality, bluescreen matte shot done on a TV budget, or Jerry Finnerman's splashes of color on the corridor walls.
 

asalaw

Sr Member
I agree. If CBS hadn’t enacted the ban, we could have gotten more high quality TOS episodes from Continues.
Which, in turn, was provoked by that Axanar ***hole poking CBS in the eye with a stick…
Yes, I love all of the clever tricks used to keep a production running smoothly. Film is about the art of illusion, after all, and, when people are doing their jobs well, you really have to pay attention to catch (and appreciate) those clever little shortcuts.
My favorite thing about doing it was always destruction. Blowing up cars and such. When we shot Freefall on Vice, there was a trailer that gets shot up and then collapses, and that was amazing. Sadly all my copious photos of that gag are in storage.

Yeah, Strange New Hair loses something by doing everything CGI, but then that’s hard to avoid on a TV budget and schedule. I’ve already noticed a couple of bottle shows, most likely done so they could spend more money on crap like that child-torture episode. Yeah, cuz that was so worthwhile…
 

asalaw

Sr Member
I’m watching Stranger Things 4, which is vastly better written than Strange New Hair. There’s a very old rule in screenwriting. It’s been ascribed to various sources over the decades and appeared in many variations, but the formulation has never changed. It goes like this: In the first act, chase your hero up a tree. In the second act, keep throwing rocks at him. In the third act, get him back down.

If SNH actually had a hero instead of a cook and lead bartender, they might have put him in peril by now. ST4 is doing that to Eleven, and in spades. It’s so well done it’s difficult to watch, especially since Millie Bobby Brown is giving an amazing performance, and in some scenes she’s so convincing, and her situation is so agonizing, I can’t watch.

I had no idea if Anson Mount was any kind of an actor before SNH, and I still don’t. Thanks to the bottom-of-the-barrel writing staff snoozing their way through the season and phoning in their stories, I may never find out.
 

pengbuzz

Sr Member
I’m watching Stranger Things 4, which is vastly better written than Strange New Hair. There’s a very old rule in screenwriting. It’s been ascribed to various sources over the decades and appeared in many variations, but the formulation has never changed. It goes like this: In the first act, chase your hero up a tree. In the second act, keep throwing rocks at him. In the third act, get him back down.

If SNH actually had a hero instead of a cook and lead bartender, they might have put him in peril by now. ST4 is doing that to Eleven, and in spades. It’s so well done it’s difficult to watch, especially since Millie Bobby Brown is giving an amazing performance, and in some scenes she’s so convincing, and her situation is so agonizing, I can’t watch.

I had no idea if Anson Mount was any kind of an actor before SNH, and I still don’t. Thanks to the bottom-of-the-barrel writing staff snoozing their way through the season and phoning in their stories, I may never find out.
Kind of hard to tell when he gets lost in the great chasm that's supposed to be his quarters. I mean, living on something the size of a holodeck is supposed to be for the Picard series, right?
 

Krieger

Sr Member
What a night my RPF friends, too tired to post on the right forum after an early start.

But here goes. I give this a solid 8 for the 'what if' scenario. A certain red costume I wasn't too keen on, but thats show business.
 

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NakedMoleRat

Master Member
I’ve watched the first half hour before work. Still have the last hour to go, so far, so predictable.

Balance of Terror with Pike instead.

And the Farragut was a Constitution class ship, should have looked just like the Enterprise.

Why not get the guy who played Sarek in Disco to be the Romulan commander? At this point, why not?

Haven’t seen the rest yet, but my prediction is that it’s now Number One in the life support chair, not Pike. We’ll see if I’m right after the rest of the viewing.
 

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