Functional Pip-boy 3000 Mk IV from Fallout 4

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Sorry for the lake of update. I have only been able to get to the Pip-Boy project occasionally for the past few weeks.

One, I am waiting on Udoo to release the Android build so I can even test if the companion app will work. But I am loosing my patience waiting for that. I am thinking about dropping the in-game functionality and switching over to making the Pip-Boy into more of a real-world sensor system. In-game functionality can be later added by a relay program of some sort.

I also recently had to suddenly get a new car due to a mechanical issue with my old car. Well everytime I get a new car I end up doing a ton of mini-projects on that. For example I last week I installed parking sensors and this week I am hardwiring in a dashcam. The weather has been real nice here in Texas so I haven't spent too much time indoors lately.

However, I have completed the holotape mechanism, it is now more robust and compact. And I am now working on making the arm-band pieces work so that they can have leather or cloth stitched to them.

I also recently created the Fallout 3D lighting logo in CAD. I am making some renderings of it for a related project.

 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The main reason for the slow down: I bought a new car and am modding that currently, check out my guides if you happen to have a Subaru Forester. I will run out of mods on that soon. It has also been insanely good weather for the past few weeks here in Texas, and so I have been spending most my time on the car and working outside my house and garage. Gotta do that stuff before it gets hot.

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So Udoo has released their "open roadmap"
They list Android alpha release as sometime in Q1 (They are already a month late from their original date). They aren't releasing a Arduino IDE until Q2, and there are a lot of issues like getting WIFI to work in Ubuntu. Effectively you can't do much with a Udoo Neo unless the developers have tried it first, or you are a hardcore Freescale programmer.
It looks like I should have stuck to my guns like I said early in the project and "Not used newly released, or unsupported boards"

So, here is the new plan:
Build the Pip-Boy without the Android O/S. Go back to the Beaglebone Black and Ubuntu. Instead create a real-world functional Pip-Boy. It will still be far better than that product advertisement version of the Pip-Boy that Adafruit put out.

Any in-game functionality could be added later by using Java or Python. There are two separate Pip-Boy companion apps out there that can run in Linux. This one is the most promising:
http://www.nexusmods.com/fallout4/mods/4664/?

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I have ordered the last of my prototype electronics parts, so currently I just need to get time to start prototyping the circuits.
The mechanical BOM is also now effectively finalized. I am now working to organize it and get a better price estimate.

The only part I don't have a hard source for is the tiny watch hand for the Rad Gauge. It needs to be 5mm long, black with a 0.64mm hole. I have scoured every watch part website I can find but haven't found a good match. It may need to be laser cut from a thin sheet of steel. I think that a plastic cut piece will end up warping.

Also, my work has approved the purchase of a Ultimaker 2 for prototyping. I will be able to use it for personal projects also. If it works well enough I may adapt the Pip-Boy for FDM printing, but my experience still says that SLS printing will make it work the best. I hate the idea of splitting up and gluing together lots of little bit, when a SLS 3D printer can output a part with everything already attached.

Otherwise the current estimate from Shapeways for all the 3D printed parts is $400. That is with one holotape ($44) and without the stand. ($70)
 

barry99705

New Member
The main reason for the slow down: I bought a new car and am modding that currently, check out my guides if you happen to have a Subaru Forester. I will run out of mods on that soon. It has also been insanely good weather for the past few weeks here in Texas, and so I have been spending most my time on the car and working outside my house and garage. Gotta do that stuff before it gets hot.

---------------------

So Udoo has released their "open roadmap"
They list Android alpha release as sometime in Q1 (They are already a month late from their original date). They aren't releasing a Arduino IDE until Q2, and there are a lot of issues like getting WIFI to work in Ubuntu. Effectively you can't do much with a Udoo Neo unless the developers have tried it first, or you are a hardcore Freescale programmer.
It looks like I should have stuck to my guns like I said early in the project and "Not used newly released, or unsupported boards"

So, here is the new plan:
Build the Pip-Boy without the Android O/S. Go back to the Beaglebone Black and Ubuntu. Instead create a real-world functional Pip-Boy. It will still be far better than that product advertisement version of the Pip-Boy that Adafruit put out.

Any in-game functionality could be added later by using Java or Python. There are two separate Pip-Boy companion apps out there that can run in Linux. This one is the most promising:
http://www.nexusmods.com/fallout4/mods/4664/?

--------------------

I have ordered the last of my prototype electronics parts, so currently I just need to get time to start prototyping the circuits.
The mechanical BOM is also now effectively finalized. I am now working to organize it and get a better price estimate.

The only part I don't have a hard source for is the tiny watch hand for the Rad Gauge. It needs to be 5mm long, black with a 0.64mm hole. I have scoured every watch part website I can find but haven't found a good match. It may need to be laser cut from a thin sheet of steel. I think that a plastic cut piece will end up warping.

Also, my work has approved the purchase of a Ultimaker 2 for prototyping. I will be able to use it for personal projects also. If it works well enough I may adapt the Pip-Boy for FDM printing, but my experience still says that SLS printing will make it work the best. I hate the idea of splitting up and gluing together lots of little bit, when a SLS 3D printer can output a part with everything already attached.

Otherwise the current estimate from Shapeways for all the 3D printed parts is $400. That is with one holotape ($44) and without the stand. ($70)
What are the outside dimensions of the main body? I'm pretty sure I can print it in my Max.
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
23407789951_ddee717d39_c.jpg


I forgot I had promised to release the Holotape 3D model for anyone wanting to print their own. Thanks to @LoneWanderer for reminding me.

I have uploaded the files in both STEP (real CAD) and STL (3D printable files). There are two models, a solid model which can be 3D printed with screw details and all. An a "Full model" which includes the internal electronics. (Although I haven't finished the PCB design yet). The full model has four 3D printed parts that assemble with some hardware. You can easily install and wire in a LED, the major parts are listed in a text file.

If you want the model in a high quality 3D print, you can order the parts from Shapeways to get the best quality, or print them yourself. Eventually I will offer them for sale on Shapeways. The full model is intended for SLS printing. I suggest ordering the "orange" part already dyed orange.

The STEP and STL files are on my Google Drive, click here.

All CAD models and artwork in the link above are released under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International.
Please don't make me issue takedowns for prints on Etsy, eBay or one of the many 3D printing websites. (I do watch).

I have ordered both models from Shapeways and will post pictures once they arrive.


/Edit @ barry99705. Please don't quote an entire post to add one question, I almost missed your question. But the longest dimension is 160mm. It is not a matter of size. It is the face that most FDM 3D printers are simply not high resolution enough to resolve the small details needed to mount the electronics, and they can't handle all the little overhangs and other features without distortion. FDM 3D printers are great at making cool looking things, but they are not great at holding dimensional tolerances or resolving small holes.
 
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Jake Joke

New Member
So, first of all, I truly want to congratulate you for putting so much passion and dedication to this project. I've spent the last two hours entirely reading this thread, following every your step one-by-one, in order to completely appreciate your work. Your skills are wonderful, your attention for details is incredible, and you're doing something that many people couldn't even imagine. Maybe you're used to compliments, but since I'm not a guy who shares them often, please accept it as a sincere, heartiest demonstration of gratitude.

With that said, I've stumbled upon your thread while doing many researches for my idea of building a working prop of the Pip-Boy 3000 MkIV, and I wish I had found you sooner (in fact, I seriously think you deserve much more visibility then you have now, so I'll do my best to bring it to you). Actually, I don't really want to build an accurate replica like you're doing, because I'd lack the skills, but I'd just want to recreate the feeling of a functional Pip-Boy, entirely and exclusively controlled by physical buttons. My ideas are very similar to yours: since I don't want to implement too many features, I was simply thinking to use a 4" smartphone running the official Pip-Boy companion app, in which I would navigate using every buttons and switch.

But that's exactly where I'm having a bad time. As you could see, a normal keyboard/joypad doesn't allow to go from a submenu to another, forcing me to touch the screen in case I wanted to do it. Do you have any advice for me in order to overcome this problem? What would you use to send the input directly from an actual switch? Is it possible to modify the source code, setting the keyboard/pad as the input, in your opinion? You've mentioned Tasker before, but how would it be implemented, since it is an external app? Do you know any other way, like for example some kind of availment of Arduino?

I've also considered the possibility to use a Udoo or a Beaglebone too, with Android, but the boot time is quite long and whereas all I need is a graphic (but accurate) representation of the Pip-Boy, that might not be worth the expence. Alternatively, I could use a Raspberry Pi running a non-official counterpart of the companion app, but I don't know nothing similar (if you do, please, share it with me), and all I could find was the Pip-Boy 3000A software like that one (wrongly) used in the Adafruit version.

I hope you can forgive me for all this question, but I'm really into this project even if I'm just a newbie. If there's something I can do to help you sharing your creations, let me know it. Anywyay as soon as I can I will do a donation, hoping this will be helpful to your work. In the meanwhile I wish you good luck and, again, I give my respect.
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Jake Joke, thanks for the praise. And I don't need this to explode in popularity just yet, after all it is still just a design, making it real is even harder.

You could make a phone-based, mostly functional pip-boy. You can use Tasker to convert keyboard input on a Android device into a touch-screen input. That was my plan at least. I have done it before on a Nexus 7 based car PC to control a touchscreen only app , using a Joycon steering wheel button to USB keyboard converter board.
The easiest way to get physical device to keyboard input is to use a Arduino. Adafruit and Thinkgeek both have detailed guides on USB input. The Adafruit Bluefruit is even simpler, but it only does button presses, not rotary input.

I mentioned one of the Python based unoffical compaion apps above: http://www.nexusmods.com/fallout4/mods/4664/?
The other one I am watching is a Java app, but development seems to be stalled: https://github.com/RobCoIndustries/pipboy/
Once I get my Pip-Boy into physical form I am hoping one of those developers will help me out with the game interface.
 
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LoneWanderer

Active Member
Thanks a ton for the Holotape models Zap! I also went with the android build, but much simpler with room for input controls via an arduino later. I used a cheap smartphone from tracphone wireless and my collector's edition with LED's added, a functional miniaturized transistor radio, and a compass needle (actually works and looks quite nice) in place of the functional rad counter for now. The android device was rooted and modified heavily to look and operate just like the pipboy in Fallout 4, including a custom boot screen and scan line across the screen. Custom app appearances and layout, it worked out very well actually. The built-in power button turns everything on and off as well which was quite the build nightmare. I also ran a fully functional usb through the Pip-Boy and housed it to sit as it should coming out of the white casing in the back. I'd love some help and advice on the possible addition of functional knobs down the line but we'll get there later. Future plans include the Holotape deck with a model of the "Grognak Ruby Ruins" or "Zeta Invaders" Holotape games to go inside the deck. Maybe an led embedded in it for looks or whatever.

Fantastic work on your build so far zapwizard and good luck going forward! I haven't posted any pics or build notes through the last few months out of pure hectic scheduling with university and a lack of desire to do so haha. When it's all done though I plan on posting pics and maybe a basic build sheet.
 
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Jake Joke

New Member
zapwizard Thank you very much for all the advices, as soon as I can I will order all the necessary from Adafruit and start my build. I hope that those programmers will help you with your project, but I know that after seeing your impressive work they will surely be happy to help.

I also went with the android build, but much simpler with room for input controls via an arduino later. I used a cheap smartphone from tracphone wireless and my collector's edition with LED's added, a functional miniaturized transistor radio, and a compass needle (actually works and looks quite nice) in place of the functional rad counter for now. The android device was rooted and modified heavily to look and operate just like the pipboy in Fallout 4, including a custom boot screen and scan line across the screen. Custom app appearances and layout, it worked out very well actually.
Hi LoneWanderer, I'm trying to build an "almost-fully-functional" Android based Pip-Boy too! Would you mind if I ask you for some help?
Are you using the Bethesda companion app or have you changed all the appearance of your smartphone's layout? What files and apps did you use to do it? Would you share a guide and images of your work? Also, what Arduino device are you planning to use for the physical input?
Sorry if I'm a little annoying, but I'm really glad to have found a thread like this, with enthusiastic people like you guys! I'd be happy to offer any assistance or advice if needed, especially when I'll be effectively working on my build.
 
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LoneWanderer

Active Member
@zapwizard Thank you very much for all the advices, as soon as I can I will order all the necessary from Adafruit and start my build. I hope that those programmers will help you with your project, but I know that after seeing your impressive work they will surely be happy to help.



Hi LoneWanderer, I'm trying to build an "almost-fully-functional" Android based Pip-Boy too! Would you mind if I ask you for some help?
Are you using the Bethesda companion app or have you changed all the appearance of your smartphone's layout? What files and apps did you use to do it? Would you share a guide and images of your work? Also, what Arduino device are you planning to use for the physical input?
Sorry if I'm a little annoying, but I'm really glad to have found a thread like this, with enthusiastic people like you guys! I'd be happy to offer any assistance or advice if needed, especially when I'll be effectively working on my build.
Hey man yeah no problem, so I'm going to put a quick pic thread up today for you and whoever else is interested in it. I'll throw some details in there today about what features it has and all that, but probably not a full build sheet yet. Check back and I'll have a link to it for you, or just watch the prop thread today :)
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER




Hey folks, look at what just arrived in the mail, my first holotape 3D print!

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First off, to understand why I use SLS printing you have to understand the scale a bit. Here is the holotape next to a quarter. I think most people are envisioning a holotape as being as large as a cassette tape. (For those of you a generation behind, a cassette tape is that thing you say Starlord loading into his walkman in guardians of the galaxy) Instead you have to think of the holotape as the size of a mini-cassette tape

The tiny details that are present in the CAD model simply would be rendered invisible when printed on a FDM printer. Due to the fused powder nature of SLS printing, some details get fused together, but are still there in a ghostly form. These little details can easily be added back in by using a needle file.

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And it is fully functional. I used a needle file an exacto knife to clean up a few spots, but the door snapped into place and moves. I am so happy it worked the first time!
(Sorry for the dry skin, I am not a hand model...)

A word or warning and a tip:
Until sealed with a clear coat, SLS nylon parts absorb moisture and any dirt from your hands. I wash my hands with rubbing alcohol to remove any oils before working on the parts.
It can also be very hard to work with the tiny parts when sanding and filing. If you put them onto a microfiber cloth, they stick to it almost like velcro and making working on the parts far easier. I then used the cloth and a tooth brush to clean up the parts and remove any loose powder.

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As you can see here the detent feature which fixes the position of the potentiometer works great.
I don't have the hardware yet, or the circuit board finished, but this shows shows it will work as designed.


I will probably keep this piece unpainted. I will order a 2nd when I start ordering the rest of the Pip-Boy.

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I also ordered a solid, single part version of the Holotape.

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You can download the 3D model buy looking a few posts above.
If you want to support the project, please purchase the Holotape from my Shapeways store. Visit the project run post to get the link to the store.
 
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zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
What you see above is straight off the printer. The orange part is pre-dyed by Shapeways. I haven't smoothed it or painted it yet.
I used a needle file to restore the shape of the press fit parts. (The sliding door and wheels)

SLS parts end up with a fine sandstone like texture. The parts are solid nylon, you can sand them smooth without fear of sanding through a thin side wall.
Nylon sands to a smooth glossy finish. You can also apply a thin layer of clear coat, and then sand that to keep the smallest details. I like to use matte clear coat for this.

This prop makes a great test for the print quality that I can expect on the rest of the design. The snap-on door was particularly risky and tight tolerance, but it moves perfectly.
The two wheels required some filing to make them fit into the potentiometer. That was expected, as I made it with zero tolerance. Too small and they would easily fall out or wobble. You can always remove material, so better to error on that side.

I will drill the hole for the pin using a 1mm drill bit. I am getting close to ordering all the hardware for the Pip-Boy. The order won't be cheap however due to the minimum order quantities involved. For example the 1mm dowel pin used to hold the wheels together costs only $0.11...but you have to buy them in packs of 100, costing $10.56. It is similar for the screws. The screws are plastic-tapping type, and the pin is too small.

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My holotape design is 60mm wide, if you wanted it to fit well with the the larger Pip-Boy Edition, then it should be about 70mm wide.
I still have my prop-edition design in CAD, I may redo that design a bit larger for those who want it as a desk prop and never will insert it into a Pip-Boy. In that case I would scale it to look closer to what you perceive in the game. Would anyone be interested in ordering that?
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER


Well I take it back what I said about the scale for the Pip-Boy edition. When I place the Holotape onto my Pip-Boy edition model it actually fits perfectly. Any bigger and it would be too long.

I still think I will design a easy build version which has separately assembled and moving parts, but takes optional simple electronics that anyone can put together.
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER


Okay, I finished building a tweaked "Prop" version of the Holotape design, this is the one to order until I get the rest of the Pip-Boy built.
This version comes with 3D printed screws, which can be used to assemble the Holotape. (Beta feature), you can still use real metal screws.
It can also be upgraded with a LED, switch and battery to act like a simulated holotape.

Please purchase the Holotape from my Shapeways store. Visit the project run post to get the link to the store.
I have ordered it today, it takes up to two weeks to arrive, I will post photos once it arrives.
 

LoneWanderer

Active Member
This is awesome! So which version should I print to eventually place in my collectors edition yet to be built holotape deck?
 
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