Eomer from LOTR build - WIP

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andveryginger

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Sorry I missed this at D*C. The whole ensemble turned out fantastic -- from head to toe! Inspiring and gorgeous work!
 

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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
WOW, this costume is incredible! Can you describe the painting technique you used on the foam "metal" scales and what paints you used? I love the look, I'm currently working on my breastplate for my female Thor costume for Halloween, and trying to find the best technique to make the foam look metal-like. Thanks!
The foam scales were originally going to be done in black foam, but I couldn't get the large roll of it until too late, so they were cut out of white foam. After cutting I painted them with black acrylic, making sure to get the sides and bottom as well (so use black foam!). Finally, I applied silver rub-n-buff.
Edit for better description: I'd get a tiny dot of rub-n-buff paste on my finger, then start at the center of one scale, rubbing in a circle outwards. That way, the edges turned out a bit darker than the center, which I felt added dimension and realism.
The whole time, I kept them in the rows you see in the image, so they'd be easy to sew.
I was also originally planning to heat-form each scale to have the slight center ridge you see in the original. I even built a tool to do so out of pliers and some sheet metal. However, I found that heating them caused too much curling, and trying to form them with little to no heat resulted in the ridge going away when I applied the rub-n-buff. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1379305583.490373.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1379305598.154580.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1379305620.732980.jpg
 
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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
Since last year I've been wanting to complete this armor with a few of the pieces I didn't get to finish for DragonCon 2013. Build write-up coming soon, but for now here's the completed helmet!
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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
I debuted the helmet at Chicago Comic Con today, and it seemed to be a huge hit. Karl Urban himself declared, "phenomenal."
Here's a photo from Max on flickr.

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Pete SSS

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I just saw your post on the FB group, but had to come over here to see the build. I've got to say, its a beautiful, BEAUTIFUL set. I can't wait to see the write up for the helmet, it's one of my all time favourites, and this looks like you have totally nailed it. I love the Rohan designs, and always wanted to make a Royal Guard, or Theodred set of armour, alas, I only ever got as far as making a shield!

Rohan Shield

Again, stunning work mate!
 

Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
My first step was to draw the basic shapes in Illustrator, and scale them to the correct size. I was a bit off in my interpretation of the ear details, but I’ll fix that later. The front and side shapes were straightforward enough, but I had to guess at the shape of the circumference. Once I printed those out at the correct scale, I cut them out of 1/4″ MDF, then slotted and glued them together with wood glue. I then filled in the voids with pink insulation foam and carved it to shape with a rasp. At this point I was only worried about the main portion of the helmet – I would tackle the cheek guards separately. I could have done them concurrently, but I felt a helmet with a flat base like this would be easier to work with.

Once the shape was where I wanted it, I covered the entire form with acrylic paint, then a coat of wood glue. I’d never tried this technique before, but I know that applying Bondo directly to foam is bad news. The foam will degrade and you’ll be left with a mushy mess. Next came several layers of Bondo, with plenty of sanding in-between. It was most important to get the four “quarters” nice and smooth. The MDF ended up showing through a bit, but I wasn’t too concerned – I’d eventually be building these areas up to simulate the metal bands on the finished helmet. To do that, I used something I picked up from Blind Squirrel. I first used a compass to trace a line all the way around the helmet at the width of the band. Then I used masking tape to build up an edge at that line – I used 8 layers of tape. I then applied a thick layer of Bondo right up to the tape, sanded it when it was cured, and removed the tape. I also used masking tape to make the recessed sunburst design on the front.

First, I put down some masking tape on my cutting mat, and taped the shapes from my Illustrator print-outs onto the tape. I traced those shapes with an exacto, then peeled them from the cutting mat and stuck them to the helmet by eye. Next, I skimmed a layer of Bondo over the area and sanded it once cured to expose the tape and blend the edges into the rest of the helmet. Finally, I extracted the tape to reveal a nice recessed sunburst. I imagine filling primer would have worked as well as Bondo for this purpose.
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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
Last thing I did before molding was to add the semi-circle details to the sides. These were just cut from card-stock and glued to the helmet. Next it was time for silicone (Smooth-on Mold-max 40). Once the silicone cured (2 coats), I made a mold jacket with MDF and fiberglass. For the cast, I ordered Onyx resin and aluminum powder from Smooth-on. I brushed the entire mold with the dust, as well as mixing it into the resin. After slush-casting the helmet, I left it in the mold and reinforced it with a couple layers of fiberglass. When I finally pulled it out of the mold and polished it with steel wool, I was overjoyed with the finish.
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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
The crest began in a similar manner to the rest of the helmet, but instead of using Bondo, I skinned the foam with sulfer-free clay. I was more comfortable making the organic shapes I needed out of clay, and I knew from experience I could take a mold from this clay with no problems. Lucky for me, a few days previously Weta had launched their new website which features spectacular close-ups of this helmet. I spent two nights sculpting the horse head before I was satisfied and it was time for silicone. In a perfect world I would have cast this solid, but I was low on resin and I knew I still had to cast the cheek guards, so I slush cast the crest and filled it with Crayola Model Magic (I was totally winging it at this point). This was 8/17, exactly 6 days until I needed it completed.


My documentation fell off a little from here on out, and I don’t have any pictures of sculpting the cheeks or ear-disks. The cheeks were a scaled-down version of the main helmet procedure, including layered contoured foam, acrylic, Bondo, masking tape details, more bondo, lots of sanding. The ears were just super-scuply, baked, sanded, molded, cast and painted. I noticed by following Blind Squirrel‘s Theoden build that one of the details on his helmet is the same as on Éomer’s, so I used his version as a reference for sculpting mine.
The last detail that had been keeping me up at night was the knot-work trim that went all the way around the helmet, up the sides and down the cheeks. I considered 3D printing it, but I have no experience doing that and not enough time for trial and error. I considered braiding actual metal wire, which I later discovered had been used on another costumer’s version of this helmet. I considered finding fabric trim and somehow making that look like metal. BUT NO! I had an epiphany late one night, and went out to the garage to confirm that it would work. I had bought this roll of really thin aluminum from Michael’s, and I cut off a piece and drew on it with a ball-point pen. This actually did a great job of embossing the metal with my pattern, so I just traced the braid onto the thin metal and cut strips.
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Grey Pilgrim

Well-Known Member
I bought a platinum blonde extra-long ponytail from ebay. It has a loop on the end, which would make it easy to attach.
Before gluing the crest to the helmet with E-6000, I needed to make sure I could attach the ponytail. To attach the ponytail, I drilled about a 1/2 - 3/4 inch hole in the crest, and a much smaller one in the top of the helmet. I also screwed a small picture-hanging hook into the interior of the helmet, close to the new hole. After gluing the crest down, I looped wire through end of the ponytail, and fished that through both holes, then secured the wire to the hook. The tail remains removable, in case I find a better one someday, or can afford a real horse tail.
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Guri

Sr Member
This is so alarmingly realistic... totally blown away. Some day I MUST see this in person.
 

Guri

Sr Member
This is so alarmingly realistic... totally blown away. Some day I MUST see this in person.
Finally got to see it in person!! Such a crazy night I didn't get to study it up close enough, though. :p But it is beautiful! (and yeah, I stole your photo you took because we didn't bring our camera)

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