Limited Run Sign up thread for V2 vented pommels and Mystery Chunks (Signup updated 7/27/2020)

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


Halliwax

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Bummer to see people exiting.
the value of this is a proprietary threaded chunk to accent an FX capable AS V2 hilt.
Even in tandem with a found part.
I gave Dann 3 slightly varied found chunks to reference yesterday for the model update.
Shame to see the trend forming here but... I think with the vented pommel in play people are going to want these with their installs when the Chunk is realized as non-viable for certain functions (like easy removal, interior maximization for chassis, etc)
:rolleyes::eek:

Exactly Bryan, I think people aren’t realizing the chassis may get in the way of the vintage counts feet.. and that the screw in replica is more feasible for the FX community
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

MacBeath

Well-Known Member
Sorry to say, I'm out too. I'm only doing a static hilt, and getting the chuck locally saves on the international postage.
 

JerryB2

New Member
If possible, I'd like to be put down for another chunk; that is, at total of 1 vented pommel and 2 (not-so) mystery chunks. If you can't work it, no problem. The thread's been quiet for a few days, so I didn't know if you were still keeping it open for the time being. Thanks!
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Retroneon

Active Member
Pommel Indexing
Some people had difficulty knowing how far to insert the pommel before tightening down the set screw.
Consider drilling a shallow hole in the pommel, to serve as an indexing guide. Could this detail be added to the run?

Critique
The reason I would like one vented pommel, and two chunks, is because the other chunk will go on the non-vented pommel.
With all the threading, this looks to be a very accurate and secure static hilt.
I understand the primary goal is to have an accurate form to the stunt prop. The ability to accept FX has always been of secondary focus.
It will be nice to have the vented section in case I want to do an FX install. But I'm starting to wonder about the practicality of it all.

There's a NeoPixel crystal reveal of this hilt, posted on YouTube.
To use it, the whole thing essentially has to be dismantled every time. And the process reversed to store it away. This is because the kill key is inside the chassis.
You have to undo the set screw for the pommel. Remove the pommel. Slide out the chassis. Remove or insert the kill key. Slide the chassis back in. Put the pommel back in. Tighten the set screw.
The build is very impressive. But there's no way to be spontaneous; or to set and forget.

The only removable blade saber I had before this is a Parks. The hold-down screw is made from a soft metal, I think to avoid stripping the threads of the body over time.

So the reason I'm writing this is: I think there's merit in having the cone knob or boot chunk be a kill key. Maybe even have the middle of the stem threaded, while the lower portion is smooth. The problem with this is I'm not sure the preexisting hole is wide enough.

I have some ideas on how to increase practicality. But I don't know if such parts can be retrofitted. Or if it would require a complete redesign. It might not be enough like the stunt prop anymore.

The Head
The emitter flange is a cap and does not need to come off. It can turn with the outside of the balance pipe.
The blade plug is shaped like a cup, with a bearing and nipple press-fitted inside. Thus, the nipple is part of the blade plug, but can spin freely.
The grenade stem extends all the way into the balance pipe. The end of the stem works like a collet for the blade. It's split, tapered, and threaded.
There's a sleeve that goes over the stem end, to tighten the collet. The inside of the sleeve is tapered and threaded. The outside has vertical grooves.
The balance pipe goes over the sleeve. The inside of the balance pipe has vertical grooves. The balance pipe base is attached to the stem with circlips.
You can turn the balance pipe, but it does not move up or down. The sleeve turns with it, because of the parallel grooves. But the sleeve is allowed to slide up or down as it threads along the stem.
As a result, you do not need to mess with screws when inserting or removing the blade.

The Clamp
There is a storage receptacle in the hilt under the clamp card. A second chunk can be stored here. Flip the lever, and slide the card or clamp, to gain access to this chunk.

The Cone Knob
It really is a knob! Turn it one way to activate lights and sounds. Turn it the other way for lights only.

The Chunk
The chunk works as a kill key. There are two. One has a nonconductive stem. The other has a conductive stem. Whichever one not being used gets stored under the clamp. The stem is held by detent, and requires no threading to worry about. Timing of the rotational angle could be set by keying the shaft at the landing.

The Pommel
The pommel is the only part you would need to unscrew to change. Instead, maybe the circular indentation could be a hidden release button. Like when changing a camera lens.

Closing Remarks
Hopefully this gave you some new ideas on how to modify this hilt for FX. If not, perhaps some of these ideas could be implemented in a future design.
 

Anakin Starkiller

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Pommel Indexing
Some people had difficulty knowing how far to insert the pommel before tightening down the set screw.
Consider drilling a shallow hole in the pommel, to serve as an indexing guide. Could this detail be added to the run?

Critique
The reason I would like one vented pommel, and two chunks, is because the other chunk will go on the non-vented pommel.
With all the threading, this looks to be a very accurate and secure static hilt.
I understand the primary goal is to have an accurate form to the stunt prop. The ability to accept FX has always been of secondary focus.
It will be nice to have the vented section in case I want to do an FX install. But I'm starting to wonder about the practicality of it all.

There's a NeoPixel crystal reveal of this hilt, posted on YouTube.
To use it, the whole thing essentially has to be dismantled every time. And the process reversed to store it away. This is because the kill key is inside the chassis.
You have to undo the set screw for the pommel. Remove the pommel. Slide out the chassis. Remove or insert the kill key. Slide the chassis back in. Put the pommel back in. Tighten the set screw.
The build is very impressive. But there's no way to be spontaneous; or to set and forget.

The only removable blade saber I had before this is a Parks. The hold-down screw is made from a soft metal, I think to avoid stripping the threads of the body over time.

So the reason I'm writing this is: I think there's merit in having the cone knob or boot chunk be a kill key. Maybe even have the middle of the stem threaded, while the lower portion is smooth. The problem with this is I'm not sure the preexisting hole is wide enough.

I have some ideas on how to increase practicality. But I don't know if such parts can be retrofitted. Or if it would require a complete redesign. It might not be enough like the stunt prop anymore.

The Head
The emitter flange is a cap and does not need to come off. It can turn with the outside of the balance pipe.
The blade plug is shaped like a cup, with a bearing and nipple press-fitted inside. Thus, the nipple is part of the blade plug, but can spin freely.
The grenade stem extends all the way into the balance pipe. The end of the stem works like a collet for the blade. It's split, tapered, and threaded.
There's a sleeve that goes over the stem end, to tighten the collet. The inside of the sleeve is tapered and threaded. The outside has vertical grooves.
The balance pipe goes over the sleeve. The inside of the balance pipe has vertical grooves. The balance pipe base is attached to the stem with circlips.
You can turn the balance pipe, but it does not move up or down. The sleeve turns with it, because of the parallel grooves. But the sleeve is allowed to slide up or down as it threads along the stem.
As a result, you do not need to mess with screws when inserting or removing the blade.

The Clamp
There is a storage receptacle in the hilt under the clamp card. A second chunk can be stored here. Flip the lever, and slide the card or clamp, to gain access to this chunk.

The Cone Knob
It really is a knob! Turn it one way to activate lights and sounds. Turn it the other way for lights only.

The Chunk
The chunk works as a kill key. There are two. One has a nonconductive stem. The other has a conductive stem. Whichever one not being used gets stored under the clamp. The stem is held by detent, and requires no threading to worry about. Timing of the rotational angle could be set by keying the shaft at the landing.

The Pommel
The pommel is the only part you would need to unscrew to change. Instead, maybe the circular indentation could be a hidden release button. Like when changing a camera lens.

Closing Remarks
Hopefully this gave you some new ideas on how to modify this hilt for FX. If not, perhaps some of these ideas could be implemented in a future design.


If I do another run of v2 sabers, there would be a lot of changes. But, I don't think I'd do another run until Brandon releases new information/references about the original prop. Getting even more accurate would be my primary motivation.
 

Sieg

Active Member
I feel really bad about bailing on the chunk and it's been bugging me and has been a weight on my conscience ever since I saw this thread after my last reply. I will stick with one pommel & one chunk if that's okay and no trouble to change. I will in fact have a use for it and I don't want to be that way to a creator I admire, especially for something I committed to initially and just bail out because of the excitement of the original part being found. That was rude of me, and I apologize. I hope that's okay and that I didn't cause too much of a problem as that was not my intent.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top