General questions about metal lathes

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by Brevin Din-Shay, Mar 20, 2002.

  1. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    I hope someday I will be able to afford a lathe, especially since it will only be for hobby purposes. Before I do though, can some of you tell me more about lathes? My dad had a wood lathe when I was very young, and I hardly remember how it was used. Are they basically the same?

    Also, I have seen many references to "CNC precision designed" or something to that effect when it comes to lathe products. What does that mean, exactly? Is there software that you use in accordance with a computer that is hooked up to the lathe?

    If there are different levels/degrees of lathes, just how expensive can they be?

    Also, what other things can you construct from a metal lathe that might be useful around the house or to sell otherwise?

    Thanks for any ideas and input!

    David
     
  2. Jet Beetle

    Jet Beetle Sr Member Gone but not forgotten.

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    Ah - finally someone saved me the embarassment of having to ask these questions myself -- I want a lathe as well, but like you I only want it for sabers and such -- I don't even know where to get one -- I hope the answers begin to pour in so I can learn a thing or two.

    P
     
  3. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    </SPAN><TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>Jet Beetle wrote:<HR></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>Ah - finally someone saved me the embarassment of having to ask these questions myself </TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE><SPAN CLASS=$row_color>

    I'm good at that. I have little pride. After asking about Indy's whip, I don't think it could get any worse. [​IMG]

    David
     
  4. vaderdarth

    vaderdarth Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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  5. hydin

    hydin Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    man, some guys just cant get lathes

    [​IMG]

    chris
     
  6. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Vaderdarth, thanks for the link!

    Hydin - [​IMG]

    David
     
  7. vaderdarth

    vaderdarth Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Welcome.....Hey I'm 35 years old and still waiting to get lathed.
    LOL!!!!
    Dave
    Seriously, I should get Lathed within 2 weeks.
     
  8. obi1kenny

    obi1kenny Well-Known Member

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    Well, I've been a machinist for about 13 years or so now. I'm the Forman of a CNC department and head programmer. So, I can answer a few of your questions for you.

    CNC - Computer Numerically Controlled.
    This type of machine has the axisÂ’s run by a computer, instead of hand cranking a dial to make a turn or make an axis move. The computer controls motors that turn the lead screws of an axis depending on what type of machine you are talking about. So on a lathe you usually have a 2-axis setup and the program would control the movements to produce what ever you tell it to do. Well, I don't know if that explained anything at all. -Ken
     
  9. obi1kenny

    obi1kenny Well-Known Member

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    Oh and CNC lathes are expensive, unless you get a cheap piece of crap. The only reasonable way to get a lathe converted to CNC control is to buy and upgrade conversion kit that retrofits an existing lathe and adds motors to the lead screws of a lathe. This is still expensive. I havenÂ’t seen much for under $20,000. We just purchased a small CNC lathe here about a year ago and it was about $30,000. Which was about the same cost that I looked into for retrofitting and older machine we had. -Ken
     
  10. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Ken,

    Quite to the contrary, that answered a lot!

    I had a feeling that is how CNC lathes operated, just wanted confirmation from one of you experienced machinists.

    As for the price... [​IMG]

    I think I'll go buy a couple of Lotto TX tix tonight. [​IMG]

    David
     
  11. forttusken

    forttusken Well-Known Member

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    I would stay away from the Harbor Freight stuff if you can possibly spend a bit more. I bought a Grizzly and it is pretty good for something made in China. I spent over $1000. When you start including tooling etc, it can get really expensive. Smithy is another home machine. They often have special deals but I am not sure about the quality. My machine is pretty good but getting the tooling is not cheap and it is junk quality compared to an American made machine. Of course it didn't cost $10K either.

    Oh and they are nothing like a wood lathe. Much more skill and measuring ability is required. You can't just pick up a tool and go at it you have to think about your setup and mount the tools and take measurements.
     
  12. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Again, thanks for input, Forttusken. [​IMG]

    Unfortunately, that's still out of my price range, at least for now. [​IMG]

    As for answering about the comparison between wood and metal lathes, that makes sense. Like I said, I was very young, and my dad did very little work on it, but I remember the basic workings. It would seem metal needs a LOT more attention to detail.

    David
     
  13. Biskit

    Biskit New Member

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    An excellent source of information on the mini lathes is here:
    http://www.mini-lathe.com/

    I have the Grizzly 7x12 lathe, and my only comlaint is it's just too small. When I move I'll have to go with the 12x36 version. I have a larger milling machine that has been tremendous!

    HTH,
    Tom
     
  14. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    I have a sherline 4400 lathe- the one with the longer bed. It works great- but is on the S M A L L side. (about 6"x23" I think)

    They call it Mini for a reason [​IMG]

    However, I have really enjoyed making my first few projects- and the current one is turning out pretty cool too!

    A sherline with a decent set of accessories will cost you about $1000.

    -cris
     
  15. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Hey Cris,

    I was wondering if you were gonna chime in on this thread! [​IMG]

    After seeing the results of your Luke ROTJ, now I have something to measure a semi-affordable lathe against. (That, of course, is a BIG compliment to you once again.)

    Take care!

    David
     
  16. RandomSabers

    RandomSabers New Member

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    Someone make Cris post the stuff he has made on his mini lathe, and that will make you reconsider buying anything bigger. [​IMG]

    The truth is, with a little planning ahead, a benchtop lathe is almost as good as a heavy duty engine lathe. Its a matter of spending more time to do the same actions. A large lathe can take off as much as 1/4" of aluminum per pass, but a small benchtop lathe, like a Sherline or Microlux or Grizzly can only do anywhere from 1/64" to 1/16". If you are just starting out, and just want to see if machining is something you would be interested in doing, spending $500 on a small lathe package sure as hell beats spending $2K on something large that you might not want to keep.

    The Sherline packages have tons to offer, including milling setups, so you can do intrcate stuff like Luke's ROTJ pommel or Rebel Blaster muzzles. -they are worth checking out, at least.

    Good luck with your purchases!

    Ryan
     
  17. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Cool info, Ry!

    And, funny you mentioned that, because I almost asked Cris to do that.

    Cris, if ya don't mind, could you post more of your fine work in this thread? [​IMG]

    David
     
  18. gavidoc

    gavidoc Well-Known Member

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    Brevin,

    The lathe question was answered but no one told you any hard info about CNC.

    There are 2 different ways to program a CNC.

    You can hand write the coding like the old timers [​IMG] (dubbed g-code) or you can program in the tool paths using a 3d Cad/Cam program.

    As stated, CNC lathes and CNC mills are not cheap. Before I became the CNC man, work purchased an older Fadal 3 axis CNC for $80,000. And that was used.

    The program I currently use to translate the 3d files to "g-code" is Surfcam. That program alone costs around $15,000. And it's not one of the better ones. I'm looking into purchasing a different one called MasterCam (the best IMO) which will be around the same amount if not more.

    But, then you also have to know how to create the 3d file. Are you using a solid modeling cad program or a surfacing modeling cad program?

    Solid modeling programs like Solidworks are easier to use, but harder for more advanced forms. Then you need to resave the files into a format that the Cam program can read.

    take for example: We use 2 different Cad programs at work. Solidworks 2001 is what my department uses which is a solid modeling program. I have to save the solidworks file into a surfcam file before I can open it in Surfcam.

    The other ID department uses Catia which is a surfacing Cad program. I can't open Catia files with Surfcam so the files have to be saved as an Iges file. Sometimes, there are translation problems when I try to open an Iges file in Surfcam so I have to then open the Iges file in Solidworks and convert the file to a surfcam file.

    All this before I can even create my tool paths and generate the code to run the program.

    Add into the mix that the Cam programs are set up to run with a certain machine (each machine's inital g-code setup codes are different) and it makes it hard for, say me to program a part for you to then have you take it to someone else with a different CNC machine.

    Make sense?
     
  19. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that sounds a lot more complicated than I thought, Gav.

    To answer you, yes, it makes sense, but in a highly technical way. [​IMG]
    Very interesting, nevertheless. I was wondering particularly about how you would get 3D objects programmed and therefore produce a meticulous product.

    To be honest, CNC sounds like an art form or a very specialized skill, at least. Am I correct?

    David
     
  20. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    Cris is having a really rough day (night?) at work so I'll post some pics for him:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    AND he is currently working on a Zam gun for me! [​IMG]

    I was thinking you could make some pretty cool drawer pulls and cabinet handles with a mini lathe. I'm SURE there are other things. Oooh...you could make candlesticks! THAT is how you sell a wife on a mini-lathe, gents! [​IMG]

    [​IMG] Kim
     
  21. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Hey Kim,

    Thanks for putting those up! Sorry to hear about Cris's rough time. [​IMG]

    Your added ideas for what can be made just wrapped up every question I asked...thanks again. Now I know at least one good excuse to buy one for my wife's benefit! [​IMG]

    Wow, that is beautiful work. (Just loaded on my slow dialup!) Please be sure and remind him about this thread when he gets a chance. [​IMG]

    David
     
  22. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    Well, I see that the infamous pics have already been posted...

    Kim and Ryan seem to be Pres and Vice Pres of the "Cris for Mini Lathe Poster Boy" committee.

    What someone should REALLY do- is convince RY to post some of HIS pictures. Then you will really be clicking that Buy it Now button. (espescially the one with the pointy brass end piece and the small coulumn shaped bits surrounding the emmiter- OH OH- and the much more accurate queens blaster, and that freaking awesome Naboo Ascension Gun etc...)


    And heck- since we are on the subject of queen's blasters- what kind of polish are you using for that mirror finish, Ryan? I have yet to come close.

    -cris
     
  23. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    oh- here's my favorite pic [​IMG] With the blade attatched!

    [​IMG]

    -cris
     
  24. RandomSabers

    RandomSabers New Member

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    Okay...but you asked for it - these are smaller photos, so as not to clog up 56K modems
    A few custom sabers:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And a couple of blasters:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Yes, it there is an artform to machining; hand machine or CNC, there is alot of work that goes into the "pre-machining" aspects of things as well as the actual hand work.

    Brev- if you were thinking about picking a lathe up do do any of your own work, a benchtop lathe certainly wont do you wrong. I dont doubt for a second that anyone of the big guys who do large runs on sabers, take them to companies with big ol' CNC's - there is no way to produce and REPRODUCE accurately the same saber over and over on a hand lathe, in the speed and precsion that CNC will do.

    Cris - I try to save all my polishing work for one day, because I get so filthy, I look like a coalminer when I am done. I picked up a simple $25 two wheel grinder at Home Depot, and replaced the grinding wheels with buffing wheels. One is for Tripoli (first stage) and the other wheel is for Red Rought (for the ultimate mirror). I wear a hat, and goggles and cloth/latex gloves -because the pieces get hot enough to cause blisters....but in the end, I still look like I just got crammed through a chimney. BUT, as cruddy as the polishing work is...it makes such a huge difference in my opinion. The Nabooo blaster wouldnt look as elegant unless it reflected images the way it does so brightly. Gav also gave me some pointers for 'sealing' the shiney materials with a sealer...I am sure he will post on what he uses...but I just use gloss urethane spray...like a woodworkers finish.

    Anyway...good luck to anyone who is thinking about machining. Keep this in mind. If you bought a simple $600 lathe/mill combo and made 3 of the sabers that are/were offered on the forums in the past...you would have recouped your money - and still have the lathe, to make some of the stuff MR isnt going to make [​IMG]

    Later
    RYan
     
  25. obi1kenny

    obi1kenny Well-Known Member

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    Gavidoc, we should talk some time. We run 3 Fadal cnc mills on the floor right now, and I still program almost all of our new jobs by hand. I have Surfcam and use it when it's a big job or a complex part. But still find it more comfortable to sit down to type straight G code off the top of my head. I usually go back and hand edit my Surfcam program anyway.

    Brevin, go get a bench top lathe and start cutting some metal, that's the best way to learn. But be careful and read the manual first and wear eye protection! -Ken
     
  26. Darth Kukiman

    Darth Kukiman New Member

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    obikenny,

    thank you so much for the chat, really really helpful.. i hope someday soon i'll be telling you in anakin's voice "its working!!!" hahahah

    gavidoc,

    just pm-ed you, if u hv time, hope to hear your reply, if not, its alright! thanx anyway!

    rest,

    i hope we all can join the prop making universe with lathes and mills!!!!

    Kk
     
  27. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    Ya See! now that's what I'm talking about!

    Thanks, Ryan [​IMG]

    Did you get the polishing compounds at Home Depot too?

    I have seen the pack of 4 colors of polish- but have never tried it out. I have been finishing my stuff right on the lathe with successively lower grades of sandpaper and then the MAAS metal polish that I had laying about.

    thanks for the tips!

    -cris
     
  28. vaderdarth

    vaderdarth Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Guys,
    most of the saber reps out there were done in sections on a mini lathe. My lathe can handle 10" metal stock. So If my saber were to be say 12", I can do half at a time no problem.
    Dave
     
  29. obi1kenny

    obi1kenny Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, IÂ’m a bit of a disadvantage because we donÂ’t have any large capacity CNC lathes and none with a tail stock to support the shaft of a saber. So all of the saber shafts IÂ’ve done have been done on a manual lathe. I try and break down the prop into smaller sections so that I can produce them on my smaller lathes anyhow and it looks a lot cooler if you can unscrew it and break it apart. -Ken
     
  30. gavidoc

    gavidoc Well-Known Member

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    I made all the parts except the clamp on either a CNC, manual mill, or a manual lathe.

    Not a benchtop mind you, but still a lathe. And they were done in sections.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Emitter was made on a manual lathe
    Grenade Stem was made on a manual lathe
    Grenade body was made on a manual lathe and a manual mill
    Gear was done with a CNC and a manual lathe
    Pommel was done with a CNC and a manual lathe
     
  31. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    I am just stunned at what I see here. I am really glad I posted this thread now, not just for the great info, but to see these fantastic pieces you all have done!

    Ryan, I am a nut when it comes to custom jobs (as long as they aren't TOO far out there!). Those are really fine designs you have. Especially the blasters -- since I am really a "saber person" if you will, I haven't really explored what people have made as far as custom blasters. Very unique, love the dual scopes and wood grip. [​IMG]

    </SPAN><TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>RY27 wrote:<HR></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>Brev- if you were thinking about picking a lathe up do do any of your own work, a benchtop lathe certainly wont do you wrong. I dont doubt for a second that anyone of the big guys who do large runs on sabers, take them to companies with big ol' CNC's - there is no way to produce and REPRODUCE accurately the same saber over and over on a hand lathe, in the speed and precsion that CNC will do.</TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

    More good advice, I'll keep it on file. [​IMG]


    <TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>obi1kenny wrote:<HR></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>Brevin, go get a bench top lathe and start cutting some metal, that's the best way to learn. But be careful and read the manual first and wear eye protection! </TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE><SPAN CLASS=$row_color>

    Ken, I truly believe that just diving in and going for it is the best way to learn. If you could only see how much I've screwed up on my Vader ROTJ...well, you will in a short while, I'm gonna post pics. It took me quite a while to just go ahead and get off my butt.
    Part of the reason is in your last sentence there. Sorry for repeating this to the folks who have heard it a hundred times ([​IMG]), but I've gotten metal in my eye twice from my Dremel. And yes, I was wearing goggles, so now I wear coveralls, a hat, use a face shield, and a respirator. No more chances. [​IMG]

    Gav, that Obi is stunning. Thanks for the breakdown on the different elements -- that always makes it more interesting to me.

    I actually have my hopes up a bit now, seeing what can be done with something in the $500-$600 range. Maybe by next fall I will be turning out some goods like you guys are.

    Thanks again to all for sharing! Maybe after this thread has run its course it can be archived...I just see too much great info in here to let it fall off, and future interested parties could benefit muchly.

    David
     
  32. Mercury

    Mercury Sr Member

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    I really recommend "Tabletop Machining" by Joe Martin and "The Home Machinist's Handbook" by Doug Briney. Both books are great resources for beginners in this hobby. While they are geared torward Sherline equipment, it applies to all small home machining equipment and uses. [​IMG]
     
  33. Rocketbobs

    Rocketbobs Well-Known Member

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    I really appreciate all this info-It great-I to have been checking into getting a lathe.

    Heres my dumb question-
    Can you use wood or high-density foam on a metal lathe or do you need a wood lathe allso?
     
  34. obi1kenny

    obi1kenny Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you can turn wood on a metal lathe. I've done it, never done anything like foam. -Ken
     
  35. gavidoc

    gavidoc Well-Known Member

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    you can do foam but I wouldn't recommend it. Wood isn't a great idea either but if you have to, you can. Just make sure to clean it afterwards.

    Problem with foam is that it is more corrosive then wood dust and it can get caught in the ways of the machine and screw with the lubrication.

    It's possible, but you have to make sure to clean the lathe well afte ryou are done.
     
  36. Mercury

    Mercury Sr Member

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    Here are some pics of my mini machineshop along with a saber I'm working on. It's the "Weapons And Field Equipment Techinical Reference Manual" version of Luke's ROTJ Saber.

    Ironically, before I ordered this equipment, I was working 2/3 12hr shifts meaning every few days I was off. A week after I got it, the Chemical Plant I work for filed Chapter11 and laid off 65 people. Luckily I was one of the 50 considered critical and was saved. However, now 50 people are doing the work of 115. Make a long story short, between double shifts and my 5 month old boy, hardly any time to play with this stuff.

    Still, I've cut the grip/control section of the saber and even made a custom emitter for a future saber out of some scrap.

    I've gotten the impression from those books I mentioned earlier that perhaps the Sherlines might be more "tight", and if you have had no experience with a full size machineshop lathe, you might have an easier time with the Sherline than with the one I have (it's very similiar in design and use as the 40" at my work). I can turn a saber out on a 40" lathe at my work in a few hours. The smaller ones take quite a bit longer to cut the same saber mainly because you can't push them as hard as a full size one.

    my .02, I think you would have fun with a mini-lathe for hobby use.

    Anyway, here are the pics:

    The Lathe
    [​IMG]
    My Shop
    [​IMG]
    The print that I'm using for the saber
    [​IMG]
    The grip against the print
    [​IMG]
    Grip close-up(it's not finished yet, still got to do the emmitter end
    [​IMG]
    Custom emitter for something(not finished yet either)
    [​IMG]

    Just keep saying "It's only a hobby..It's only a hobby" [​IMG]
     
  37. hypospray

    hypospray New Member

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    As long as we're on CNC prices, one of my relatives has several machines that cost in the neighborhood (and upwards of) $250,000 each. And he is a private business working out of a shop on his property [​IMG]

    But I'm not pretending to know much about machining, I'm still a beginner compared to some of these guys [​IMG]
     
  38. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    David,

    thought you might like to see the progress pics of my current endeavor...

    [​IMG]

    -cris
     
  39. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    blast!..... the dreaded red x.

    hopefully it is fixed now.

    -ck
     
  40. Mercury

    Mercury Sr Member

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    </SPAN><TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>kimncris wrote:<HR></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS=$row_color>thought you might like to see the progress pics of my current endeavor...

    -cris</TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE><SPAN CLASS=$row_color>

    Sweet!

    Cris, is that a saber or a gun? It reminds me of a pistol I once saw. You make it look so easy! [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  41. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Merc [​IMG]

    its the metal portion of the Zam Wessel pistol. I still have to make the handgrip.

    maybe I can find a pic on the net...

    -cris

    edit- just thought of the fact that it is spoiler material...probably should not post movie pics here [​IMG]

    Just look for the Episode II girl in purple and you will find the gun I am making for Kim's celebration costume [​IMG]
     
  42. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Wow, I just logged back on before hitting the sack early (haha, thought I'd do that 2 hours ago!), and I see yet another great work! Thanks for putting that up, Cris. [​IMG]

    It's funny that Merc asked that question, because I actually thought it was a saber! I guess you just can't assume too much...heck, look at the fact that a flashgun was stuck in the end of one of Fett's blaster rifles and that should say enough. [​IMG]

    What are you making the grip from? I don't know much about that gun at all. If that's spoiler info, just PM me. [​IMG]

    David
     
  43. kimncris

    kimncris Well-Known Member

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    I think we are making it from injection molded bondo board or something like that.

    I'll let you know after tomorrow. Hopefully I will have most of it finished,

    ck
     
  44. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    I thought I'd revive an old topic. [​IMG]

    Those of you with metal lathe and milling experience, please share your thoughts and works in this thread!

    I'm curious about a couple of things:

    1. What brands do you recommend (or DO NOT recommend!) for around the 500-1000 dollar price range? What are your reasons?

    2. What have you or someone you know created? Please share pics! [​IMG]

    Thanks!
     
  45. Poseidon11

    Poseidon11 New Member

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    I have a Jet 9 x 20 lathe. It has a 3/4 hp motor. I find it plenty enough power to cut aluminum for sabers and such. What I don't like about the smaller lathes is the inablility to use a taper attachment.

    When buying a lathe you also have to consider the price of tooling and accessories. I got a good deal on my lathe at $500 and have invested another $300 in additional parts.

    Here is a link to a Harbor Freight 9 x 20 (identical to the Jet). http://bedair.org/9x20.html

    This has a great deal of info about these lathes.

    Once I had the lathe it was only a matter of time before I HAD to buy a mill. [​IMG]
     
  46. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Poseidon!

    I've heard a similar story about the Jet brand from a friend, but his actually involved breaking down. [​IMG]

    Anyone else? I'm hoping there will be some new info in this thread so that the Admins will merge it to my original archived one:
    http://rpf.prop-planet.com/viewtopic.php?topic=10044&forum=5

    Lots of broken pics, but much good info. [​IMG]
     
  47. badger

    badger Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    555
    I have a taig mini lathe. I can't recommend it over any other lathe because I've never used anything else. I got it for free as a gift, but they seem to be around $400 or so. The nice thing is that they are expandable and adaptable.

    http://taigtools.com

    It has been a lot of fun to learn with and from.

    Here are some of the things I've made with it.

    Zam Wessal Blaster barrel
    [​IMG]
    Gallery: http://box23.net/coppermine/thumbnails.php?album=1

    Imperial Disc "Greeblies"
    [​IMG]
    Gallery: http://box23.net/coppermine/thumbnails.php?album=3

    Rebel Pilot Code Cylinders
    [​IMG]

    Boba Fett Knee Darts
    [​IMG]
    Gallery: http://box23.net/coppermine/thumbnails.php?album=18

    badger
     
  48. Rodann

    Rodann Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,242
    I bought an Enco Lathe/Mill/Drill combo for $900 new a few years ago- around 2000 I think. It was well worth the money, and hasn't broken down yet (crosses fingers).

    It's 11" between centers (average saber length), and I've made dozens of sabers, knee darts, blaster parts, and even my entire aluminum custom blaster on it. The mill is a bit shaky- it uses the drill chuck/arbor, and can fall out if it vibrates too much. Small machines are less steady anyway.

    The lathe is great, though. And because of the mill/drill, I have a lot of versatility. You can actually drill into the part you just turned, without repositioning.
     
  49. Pulseriflefan

    Pulseriflefan Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    716
    some aluwork made with my Proxxon (table, stand & motor ca. $600-700 I think):

    [​IMG]
    PR front block


    [​IMG]
    Thompson upper and lower (sorry, allready weathered)


    [​IMG]
    Steady Cam bracket


    [​IMG]
    Smart Gun block
     
  50. Brevin Din-Shay

    Brevin Din-Shay Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    941
    Wonderful stuff, you guys! Thanks for posting the pics, also. [​IMG]

    It's good to see more people finally joining in here. [​IMG]


    Any and all knowledge is very welcome.
     

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