Functional Pip-boy 3000 Mk IV from Fallout 4

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
@jellis359,
The latch is one item which a prototype will tell a lot. The nylon is very strong, and flexible when compared to other plastics. I have beefed up all the material as much as possible in that area. The latch type is called an over-draw latch. What it means is once latched, any pulling pressure horizontally on the latch actually makes the latch hold tighter. Only pulling the lever past a certain point will release the latch. One of the nylon arms acts as spring, which has to be overcome for it to release.

In addition to the latch, there are six mating magnets which hold the Pip-Boy closed temporarily while the latch is engages. You comments however did give me an idea, maybe I can figure out a good place to attach a threaded insert for a screw. This could be used as an anchor for a security cable.

@Voltaire Surge,
The current speaker I have shown is CUI, CDS-13138-SMT. I selected it because it is tiny, and PCB surface mount. (No cable).
It is only 0.7W, which is tiny. But if driven correctly the spec says it can output 87dB. The frequency response is tweaked for voice, so you won't be pumping any bass from it. I am assuming that most of the radio in Fallout will still be tweaked to sound like old A/M radio. This type of sound should work well with this speaker. At this time I have decided to ditch the real FM radio. A real FM radio chip adds quite a bit of cost, not just in the FM chip, but the fact that I would have to add audio mixer. On top of that they require a 3-ft long antenna, which I won't have. So instead the radio tuner knob will tune through sounds pre-stored in the Android. Perhaps the companion app will even have FM radio, who knows.

The small potentiometers I am using are: Bourns 3310 series. They are some of the smallest POTs I could find. The rotary encoders are TT Electronics EN12 series.
The LEDs I am using have a color temperature of 2700K. That means they have a warm yellow glow instead of cold blue. I source my parts from Digikey and Mouser.com It isn't the cheapest way to develop a project, but I am not designing this for the mass market, I am designing it for myself.

To a certain degree, being a sticker to details is that makes someone an engineer. 90% of what I know is self-taught. I went to school to be an electrical engineer, and self-taught myself mechanical engineering. (A decade designing products didn't hurt either) I do have to say that figuring out all the various moving components in this design took many hours of research. None of it is easy. It is all possible with enough time and thought thrown at it. Even then a good CAD design only is half of it, getting it made into a real thing can be just as hard, and require even more changes.
 
given what youhave shown so far is what made me think, maybe, if i use the right sized part i could getthe older model working? pretty much using yours as a sort of guide, and just kinda common sense. still wonder why its taken 7 years to get even this close with what we've had. i actually looked online to see how to solder, what pcb's were and how to make them (cept the proper lines, still confusing), i dont exactly have a CAD program, but i'm looking over the model so that when i do i can try and figure it out. i actually figured out whot to do with the hand piece last night, and where the select, power, and map controls are. either way, look forward to your next bit of progress, for now, i use paper, to get the overall idea of the parts placement

also, what type of screen did you use? the 3000 A had a domed glass screen but the thin one you are using seems to save space a bunch.
 
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jellis359

Jr Member
You can have convex lens/ screens printed on a high res 3d printer on solid fill


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Well i want it to feel just as real as zapwizards, i've seen someone use a domed piece before, but i feel it would take up space, and if so id have to push it up more in the casing so it doesnt take up too much space, the one zapwizard is using is very very thin, and it allows plenty of space to be left behind it. the thinner and smaller the functioning pieces the better. seen too many people make it but it be too bug inside or go right past the rim shielding to where it looks like its gunna fall out of the body. i mean the in game one is a straight up tiny tube tv piece, and thats probably heavy as crap on our arm XD but could they be see through and everything? i dont actually have my own 3d printer, i plan to make everything the right size on a 3d model and print it on shapeways
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Voltaire Surge,
I am using a 3.5" 320x240 LCD. It's a bit lower resolution then I want, but is readily available, has a glass capacative touch-screen, and full data sheets. If your only doing a one-off you can sometimes get away with a cheaper LCD from china, but you will have a heck of a time getting it to work.

There are many project logs on the Pip-Boy 3000, some more functional then others. To get a curved screen for the 3000 you use the glass from a old slide viewer. Again search other people's 3000 project logs, many have done it with the curved glass.
jellis359,
I have seen "clear" 3D printed parts. They only become clear after lots of polishing, and even then they have lots of distortion. The resin material used also deteriorates very quickly.
 
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@Voltaire Surge,
I am using a 3.5" 320x240 LCD. It's a bit lower resolution then I want, but is readily available, has a glass capacative touch-screen, and full data sheets. If your only doing a one-off you can sometimes get away with a cheaper LCD from china, but you will have a heck of a time getting it to work.

There are many project logs on the Pip-Boy 3000, some more functional then others. To get a curved screen for the 3000 you use the glass from a old slide viewer. Again search other people's 3000 project logs, many have done it with the curved glass.
@jellis359,
I have seen "clear" 3D printed parts. They only become clear after lots of polishing, and even then they have lots of distortion. The resin material used also deteriorates very quickly.
thanks again. i cant find just the lens, but it could work, do you think if i put the lens over the lcd it would look good or would it be all distorted? i actually plan to once im all done, make a list of all the parts, put a list of links, make the model public, and the wire paths for the pcb's, the size and shape for the pcb's, and the overall price, right now im just doing an information gather, get all the infor for pieces, sizes and all that, have an accurate model, and then go from there. that way, i can use mine as an example, have the files and a buyable printed model from shapeways online, and then evryone can go forth and make their own. and if people just want phone holders they can use one of the many phone holders already out there.
 

Btechnician

New Member
Are you going to be waiting for Fallout 4 to be released before finishing up some things or does the release date not even hinder you?
 

Btechnician

New Member
Wow just went back and and read everything I can't believe this is only started 3 weeks ago the progress and what you have done is amazing!
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Btechnician,

Part of me wants it in time for release, but in reality there is lots of both mechanical and electrical work left to do. And than there is a lot of time making prototyping and mechanical mock-ups. I also sort of want to know more than the short set of videos we have to see more of the how the Pip-boy works in Fallout 4 and what changed from Fallout 3.

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21209607750_c835e9be58_c.jpg


Jellis359, this no one is for you. But it's not a bad idea. By having a threaded insert inside the arm band, a cable can be attached to prevent the Pip-Boy from dropping to the ground if the latch were ever to open on accident. It only costs $1 and can be installed with a soldering iron.

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Today I redesigned the way the Holotapes work. I have decided to ditch the NFC tag idea.

The new design will use a tiny cheap circuit board which is installed into the Holotape. This PCB has four contacts. Only two contacts will be required, so I will double up on them to help ensure contact. A small resistor to detect which unique holotape is installed. The beaglebone only needs to read this value to and perform an action based on the value.

The holotape caddy has a PCB with a sping-loaded mating connector. This PCB is attached to the movable caddy, and will be wired to the motherboard. The PCB will actually help stiffen up the entire holotape caddy, as FR4 (PCB material) is very stiff.

Why did I ditch the NFC? Because of many reasons:
1) The smallest low-cost NFC tags I could find were still 25mm in diameter. To hide them inside the Holotape the holotape would have to become a complicated snap-together assembly, instead of just a simple 3D printed part.
2) NFC requires a special antenna design and can be prone to failure if the antenna and tag don't end up just right.
3) The NFC chip add a drain to the battery, with a resistor there is no extra drain.
4) The NFC circuit itself requires design work, PCB space, has to be located in exactly the right spot.
5) Simpler is always better.
 

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@Btechnician,

Part of me wants it in time for release, but in reality there is lots of both mechanical and electrical work left to do. And than there is a lot of time making prototyping and mechanical mock-ups. I also sort of want to know more than the short set of videos we have to see more of the how the Pip-boy works in Fallout 4 and what changed from Fallout 3.

---------------------

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/742/21209607750_c835e9be58_c.jpg

Jellis359, this no one is for you. But it's not a bad idea. By having a threaded insert inside the arm band, a cable can be attached to prevent the Pip-Boy from dropping to the ground if the latch were ever to open on accident. It only costs $1 and can be installed with a soldering iron.

---------------------

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/667/20776617903_41a6d54d6e_c.jpg

Today I redesigned the way the Holotapes work. I have decided to ditch the NFC tag idea.

The new design will use a tiny cheap circuit board which is installed into the Holotape. This PCB has four contacts. Only two contacts will be required, so I will double up on them to help ensure contact. A small resistor to detect which unique holotape is installed. The beaglebone only needs to read this value to and perform an action based on the value.

The holotape caddy has a PCB with a sping-loaded mating connector. This PCB is attached to the movable caddy, and will be wired to the motherboard. The PCB will actually help stiffen up the entire holotape caddy, as FR4 (PCB material) is very stiff.

Why did I ditch the NFC? Because of many reasons:
1) The smallest low-cost NFC tags I could find were still 25mm in diameter. To hide them inside the Holotape the holotape would have to become a complicated snap-together assembly, instead of just a simple 3D printed part.
2) NFC requires a special antenna design and can be prone to failure if the antenna and tag don't end up just right.
3) The NFC chip add a drain to the battery, with a resistor there is no extra drain.
4) The NFC circuit itself requires design work, PCB space, has to be located in exactly the right spot.
5) Simpler is always better.
contacks and a spring loader so it comes out easier? love it!
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Just an FYI, it is bad forum etiquette to quote a long multi-paragraph post, especially when it was just the last post up. It makes reading a the history of a post harder for others.

Yep, the spring contacts also cost less then the NFC chip and require no extra support electronics. By putting a PCB inside the holotape deck that is mostly devoid of electronics I can add some cool visual effects to that PCB. For example I was trying to figure out a good location for a "Serial ID" tag. Something that showed the Pip-Boy manufacturer (Robotech) and a serial number area. Normally this would be done on an aluminum plate, similar to the Pip-Boy edition stand. However those Aluminum plates can be very expensive in low quantities. A plate could be laser etched of course, but even this costs around $5.
 

jellis359

Jr Member
You can get metal infused printer filaments for the plate. I know people who use it to make pcbs. Or you can laser cut and etch on aluminum painters tape or party tins. Ive done that.

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zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
jellis359

What I meant is that I can use the PCB to actually print the manufacturer data. When doing text in copper on a PCB the end result is very sharp and high contrast. It would also be silver print on a black background which looks a lot like the aluminum photo exposed labels that they used on the Pip-boy edition. So there is no need to make a separate component.
Eventually I will do a rendering of what it will look like, but for now check out this PCB business card to get the overall look.
 
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My bad man. Anyway, you use solid edge right? what 3d modelling software would you suggest for a beginner? i want to work on my model as soon as i can.
 

zapwizard

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Voltaire Surge, Solid Edge has a steep learning curve, not to mention that it is very expensive. I have access to it through my work. Prior to that I often used SketchUp, but I wouldn't recommend it for complex designs that require exact dimensions. 123D from Autodesk is a good solid molder for beginners, it is specifically geared towards 3D printing.
I have been doing 3D modeling for over 20 years in one program or another. There is a lot to learn if you want to combine electronics and mechanical into a working package. But doing is the best way to learn.
 
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ahh ok, thanks. i pretty much know the parts i want to use inside it for the most part. all i need atm is to get accurate to game model and those that have them or could rip it from game dont want to share. XD i figured doing rather than seeing would be better too.

and this is one of those moments im mad at my dad for putting linux on my computer
 

jellis359

Jr Member
Don't forget about solidworks. Ive been using that since day one.
Seems we need a sub thread for similar questions.

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Btechnician

New Member
when this is all said and done you should look into making it weatherproof hell maybe even waterproof one day. only because in the fall out game you get rained on as well as swim with it. ;)
 
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