Functional Pip-boy 3000 Mk IV from Fallout 4

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by zapwizard, Aug 19, 2015.

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  1. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Lots of work on the Pip-boy CAD design. Mostly optimizing the design, but I also added a few new features.
    The image above shows just how much stuff is inside the pip-boy.

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    There are 11 PCBs, as well as dozens of hardware components, wires and fasteners. Assembling one of these will take a bit of time and skill. The tolerances between some parts is as small as half a millimeter.

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    I was able to combine the rad-gauge and radio gauge assemblies into one. The good news is that the motor that runs the rad-gauge is available in low quantities. It costs a few dozen bucks, but allows for actual precise control over the gauge needle. I still haven't found a supplier of watch hands that fit the look I want. The gauge needle may need to be custom cut. I also removed most of the connectors from the PCBs, instead wires or cables will be installed on the small PCBs, and connectors will only be on the larger master PCB. This saves some bulk, weight, and cost.

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    Shown here is the RFID PCB, with a grey disk where the antenna will be located.

    The yellow item is a place holder for an audio transformer. This large part would be required for a full geiger counter. However, a full geiger counter is turning out to be a difficult addition to the pip-boy and adds a lot of cost and risk. I think I am going to change to a Pin-Diode type radiation detector. These can detect x-rays and gamma rays, as well as a few other forms of radiation. As cool as having a full geiger counter is, it instantly adds $100 to what will already be an expensive prop. It also adds a 500V circuit, which can be very difficult to contain and control. For example I can't find any 3mm diameter, 4 conductor shielded cable which is even rated for that voltage. Also a full geiger counter is pretty useless in real-life. You can't show it's function off at any Con, unless you want to try to take a uranium sample into a public space. If you had a real geiger counter and it was picking up enough radiation to make the gauge needle even move, you probably should be running away.

    A Pin-diode detector would still be a real gamma ray detector, and can be built for just a few dollars. I also will skill keep an IR sensor as a option. At least with an IR temperature sensor you could scan a object and have the gauge show a interactive read-out.
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    One item of concern in the design is heat, as well as comfort. My friend lent me his Pip-Boy 3000, which he modded from the Pip-Boy clock. Wearing it is a pain unless you have a thick sleeve or padding. So for my Pip-boy design I created a ventilated set of bands which fit into each half of the Pip-boy. These are designed with a round entry and exit, but a elliptical center. The ellipse does two things: It give me more precious room inside for electronics, and it also form fits the Pip-boy around my arm. In this way the Pip-boy shouldn't be prone to rotating around my arm. The center is designed to fit my arm when 1/4" of padding is used. If your arm happens to be larger, then you will need to use less padding. A pattern of vent holes will hopefully keep both the wearer and the electronics cooler, and also allow the bands to flex a bit.

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    This image shows how the bands snap into each half. It also shows my new latch design in more detail.

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    Also on the back is a whole new feature. A re-tractable cable reel. This was difficult to design into a compact size, while maintaining electrical contacts.
    The reel uses a constant force spring to tug on the cable at all times, similar to a tape-measure. A 3D printed housing holds the spring to a PCB. The round PCB has four raceways, one for each of the four wires inside the cables. The rectangular PCB has four pogo-pins which bridge the connection between the internal cable, and cable reel. I estimate that a few feet of wire can be kept spooled up inside the pip-boy. The four wires are enough to run the LED lights, as well as a Pin-Diode, or IR sensor.

    It is easy to design a one-way cable clamp, however it is more difficult to design one which has some sort of release. Yes, I can add a button or something. But I am trying my best to keep the external look of the Pip-boy accurate to the game, so I don't want to add any extra buttons or levers. I really want a "Tug-to-retract" mechanism, sort of like what is in a old-school vacuum cleaner. But so far I haven't been able to find any diagrams of how these worked, or figure out my own.
     
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  2. Everett24

    Everett24 New Member

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    This is more just a question about this pipboy model, how will it scroll through the lists in each menu? The original 3000 had the scroll wheel next to the screen for the list, this one doesnt seem to. I was wondering how you were going to get that to function, other than that this is awesome.
     
  3. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Everett24: The Mk4 has a scroll wheel on the right side, as well as a select button. However there are also sub-menus in Fallout 4, which even the game designers skipped over. As there is no character animation for them in the demo videos. In either case, the LCD screen will be a capacitive touchscreen, so that will always work.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  4. Pascal Kurosawa

    Pascal Kurosawa Active Member

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    something like this?

    http://www.google.com/patents/DE102013013463A1?cl=en
     
  5. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Pascal Kurosawa, yes something like that. Although the patent images I found were next to useless. However, I did find a solution.

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    I have to say that figuring out simple a "Pull-to-retract" cable mechanism was the hardest part of the project so far. It seems so simple, and it is used in many products.
    I tried many, many search terms to find a diagram of how these things worked, I searched patents as far back as 1945 (old-school vacuum cleaner). There were no clear diagrams. I tried taking apart one of those cheap USB extension cords, but they use a tiny ball bearing, and require the cord to be pulled from both directions to work.
    I then took apart a cheap Ikea roll up window shade. They use a gravity driven ball to stop the spring, so this solution won't work either.

    Finally, I went to Home Depot and bought a ceiling mount retractable electrical cord. The mechanism inside uses a half-gear, and half-curved, spring-loaded pawl.
    I re-designed it to allow for two release points, and six lock points. Since I won't have more then a few feet of cable spooled up inside, the extra release points shorten the amount of cord you need to pull to get the return mechanism working. It was quite a challenge to miniaturize the design as much as possible. Some prototyping and tweaking will probably be required.

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    I also finished the PCB designs. On the reel the cord will pass through a ring, and then be held in place with a retaining ring. The wires will be soldered to pads on the back of the PCB.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
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  6. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Sweet lord. You have, quite literally, thought of everything. Your attention to just the smallest details is amazing, as amazing as your rendering skills. This is just too much awesome. :thumbsup
     
  7. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    I think i literally drool a little every time I see your posts. As an engineering student I find your devotion to this is inspirational.

    Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk
     
  8. Everett24

    Everett24 New Member

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    Well you could split there scroll wheel(on the top right) in two, so that you can have an analog control for everything(unless you want to use the screen), wouldn't be exactly the same as in game, but then again as you pointed out, it was skipped over. Of course it would be a space issue now that I reread your earlier post about the wheel.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2015
  9. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Everett24, Ya, there isn't room for a dual/split scroll wheel.

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    Today I designed in the hidden power connector. This will allow me to power the Pip-boy from a cord hidden in my sleeve. While the Pip-boy will have it's own battery inside. Unless I connect a ton of small batteries and cram them into every empty spot, I really only have room a single 1Ah battery, which is okay, but not huge. With all the extra features and lights on this thing, it will be pretty power hungry. You can easily fit a massive lithium power pack into a pocket which could run the Pip-boy for many hours.
    Since you most likely would wear the Pip-boy with a long sleeve jump suit, hiding a cord in the sleeve is easy. In Fallout 4, the new jump suit isn't really a denim cover-all. It seems to be a long-term stasis suit. It has what looks like cooling tubes running though the chest and sleeves.
     

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  10. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    One thing that is always a pain with custom electronic devices is getting access to maintain them.

    The Beaglebone black has on-board USB, Ethernet, Mini-HDMI, and a SD card. All of these make it easy to program and maintain, however getting access to these connections without removing the Beaglebone is tricky.

    What I did was make the "Heatsink" portion of the Pip-Boy removable. It will have two screws you can access from inside the Pip-boy. This fully exposes the USB and Ethernet connectors, as well as the power and reset buttons. While I plan on adding Wifi, it always helps to have a hardwired connection available.

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    On the top of the Pip-boy, when the Holotape deck is open, you can access the Micro-SD card and Mini-HDMI connections. The only blocked connection is the USB host jack.

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    Today my friend (the one who has a Pip-Boy 3000) convinced me that having USB access without taking the Pip-Boy apart would be a lifesaver. His Pip-Boy 3000 had a USB jack on the back. I wanted something hidden. Fortunately the USB jack happens to align well with the latch. After a bit of tweaking the position, I was able to add a cutout that allows for USB connection when needed, and is covered up by the latch when not in use.
     
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  11. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    did you see in the game trailer that the scroll wheel on the top actually switches between sub menus and not up and down on the items?
     
  12. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yes I did see that they did an animation for the sub-menus, and not the individual items. I suspect they did that just because in-game you may be quickly scrolling through a long list, and the animations would become distracting. In either case I can program the scroll wheel to do whatever I want inside Android, so that doesn't have to be set right now.
     
  13. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    Ah, gotcha. I like how you are doing it more. Also, this whole thing is beyond amazing. I couldnt think of things like this and find it all so amazing.

    what does that tiny knob below the power button do? i would think it would work as a thing to go between the sub menus and still keep the one knob as a scroll wheel. what do you think?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015
  14. zookone

    zookone Well-Known Member

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    In Fallout 3 the the item and weapons (for example) screens did not change the graphic when you scroll through the list. It only updates the graphic when you click on the list item. The Special screen and some others did change the graphic as you scrolled. Maybe this is what you are seeing carry over into FO4.
     
  15. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    I don't believe it is a knob as it is very small and there is no label. The center hole has a glossy finish on the pip-boy edition. I don't think it will have any function in-game. My theory is that it is supposed to be the sensor that detects if the player is hidden or not. And that is exactly what it will be in my design. I will have a small CdS cell in there. These are light sensitive resistors. The were invented in 1955, and are a basic electronic component. You find them used commonly in night lights. In my design it can be used to automatically control the screen and gauge back-light brightness.
     
  16. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    so if its dark everything will light up? o.o thats cool. so if your outside the screen is dim but inside its alittle more lit?
     
  17. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    Also, a question, would you do a pipboy 3000 B model that has the hand piece? the one from 3 and new vegas? it seems alittle easier and i personaly dont have something to make a model or prototype. but i did have some ideas for how it could work. i think. that way if u do make kits you can have a deluxe mark 4 and the simpler plain 3000 B model. because ive seen working ones but they use all these huge parts or cant fit their arms in the thing but you could make it all fit and work alot easier i think. just a thought. it would be when you are done with this glorious device though
     
  18. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    actualy they change as u pass them. and you see the scroll wheel move each time. and you go between the stats items and data by using the triggers which is actually the character pushing the buttons and they light up, like the power button on the mark 4. and u us the knob on the far left to go between the 5 sub menus of the 3 main categories. the selections i think seem to be more of a purely in game thing since its when u have equipped or a real out of pipboy action. in fallout 4 that same thing happens but it does show u scrolling only when u click on something.
     
  19. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Voltaire Surge
    Sorry, I am not doing any Fallout 3 props. This project has lots of work left to do.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  20. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    Thought so. what you've done on this has actually heped me see what pieces id need if i ever did something like this myself. seriously love what youve done so far. it actually makes me happy to see XD makes me think if i had the money would i choose this or a master sword? probably this
     
  21. Jakeinator123

    Jakeinator123 Member

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    It looks really nice so far, zapwizard. I'm just lurking.... Coveting... Don't mind me! :D
     
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  22. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    [​IMG]

    Hey folks, I have enough of the 3D printed design to do a estimate of the cost on the 3D printed parts. Printed at Shapeways.com, the cost of the parts is currently estimated to be $380. I have found shapeways to be the lowest price for SLS printed parts, and the few parts I have made with them have been good quality. I will probably shop around a bit once the design is more finalized. Changes will be made as I work out the placement of connectors and components on the printed circuit boards. I have at least as much work to do on the PCBs as I have had on the mechanical design.

    For those who have shown an interested in a group-buy, I have created a cool survey for you to fill out. I expect a run of these to be limited, so first come first serve will have better odds of getting into the group-buy. I am not out to make money on this project, only to get an good quality replica into the hands of those who want it. This does NOT mean I am starting a group buy soon. It is to get more information on what a kit will need to include.

    Click here for the group-buy survey.
     
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  23. ApophisV

    ApophisV Active Member

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    For the first time in years I hate myself to have skipped my mechanical engineering studies! :eek This is so ultimately cool, absolutely stunning work!

    May I ask some questions regarding the survey (to avoid distorting it needlessly)?

    Is it possible to get an rough estimate of the costs of the needed electronic components and will they be included in the kit? Just to get an very rough idea what the overall cost will be?

    Will it come with instructions, especially if you're doing a not-so-much-preassembled kit?

    Just to ensure: I guess the group buy itself won't start in 2015? (Since I need to get a new, modern pc before November (guess, why? ;)) a later date would serve me quite well ;) (Both in terms of money and time ^^)

    Anyway, keep up this amazing, beautiful work! :love
     
  24. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Go ahead and submit your information, you can edit your information anytime and I will probably update the survey over time.

    Doing a estimate of the electronics and other hardware is actually what I am working on right now, as part of the planning stages for the electronics. For example I have decided not to include a expensive ($120) and dangerous high-voltage geiger counter. Instead I will design in a Pin-Diode gamma ray detector. This costs less then $10. Each sub-circuit, such as GPS will have it's own estimate. Roughly, I expect the electronics to cost around $250. The LCD costs $45, the BeagleBone Black cost $55. Custom PCBs can be had pretty cheap, but SMT assembly costs can add up. The hardware (Screws and such) will probably be around $50. Again these are very rough off-the-top of my head estimates.

    Yes, it will come with detailed assembly instructions with as much helpful info as I can think of. For example the last real-world product I worked on (day job) has a 55 page assembly manual, as well as 16 pages of cable drawings. Also part of the reason for the interest survey is to gauge the skill level of the potential people who want a kit. If 75% of the people end up being fairly skilled mechanically, I know how much detail I have to include in the instructions.

    I don't think this group-buy will happen in 2015. As much as I would like to say, "Get this before Fallout drops!", there is a lot to prototype first. Creating the prototype will cost quite a bit, at least twice the cost of a single kit. Just after I started this project both my wife and I had medical issues, the A/C at my home had to be replaced ($7400), and my car required $1500 in servicing. So now funds are a bit tight. I may start looking for a sponsor, or stating a crowdfunding campaign just to build the prototype. I won't do that until I have a good estimate of the cost of the kit and prototype costs.

    I plan on prototyping the mechanical components by creating smaller sub-assemblies. For example rather then spending $380 to prototype all 40+ 3D printed parts, I would just order a truncated version of the project, such as the radio knob gear assembly. Including a portion of the Pip-Boy shell. This would let me test each mechanical component individually, and tweak those parts before ordering the whole thing. This takes a bit more time and money, but prevents a huge waste in creating the whole thing at once, only to find that some gear binds up, or the holotape deck springs up so hard it falls out.
     
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  25. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    Wil you upload pictures or videos of the individual parts as you prototype them? That would be cool to see all the work you've done so far bit by bit as it is figured out
     
  26. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    Have you done any element analysis on the tape deck and latch mechanism? High use areas?

    Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk
     
  27. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yes, absolutely.

    There isn't really a need to analyze the mechanism wear and tear. I am over-designing the mechanism. All the springs are attached to metal pins, instead of 3D printed plastic posts (which are prone to breaking). All the sliding parts are also metal pins, running inside plastic slots. The SLS Nylon used is self-lubricating and will only get smoother over time. The arms which the tape deck uses will be prototyped using Nylon, if that is too flexible, I can make them using stiff FR4 (PCB material), or even make them from metal.
    The only major risk is that the springs will be too strong or too weak, prototyping it is really the only way to get a feel for how the mechanism will feel.
     
  28. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    I had assumed the latch mechanism would be under considerable tension. That was my thought. Do the material properties of the nylon parts have a df and fos for the latch being used frequently. Don't want a 500$ investment falling off my arm. Just a thought.


    Well I'm in. I did the survey. You should really give kickstarter a try for funding. Unless Bethesda would give you a big frowny face.
    :(

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2015
  29. Btechnician

    Btechnician New Member

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    This is amazing I'm really glad someone with your know-how and manpower is taking on this project I was really bummed when I found out that the fallout 4 pip boy was just a glorified cell phone holder. and I really wanted to take the test on with me and my friends but we do not have the know-how or experience.can't wait to see what the future holds for this project of yours and I'm glad that you let us be along for the ride.
     
  30. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    what model speaker are you planning to use? i'm trying to look for pieces to list for a pipboy 3000 A model using the pieces u are using as a type of reference. giv how small the pieces u've found are t would actually work well with the other model aswell, i've looked up tutorials to make pcb's and found a site that supplies rotary switches and encoders, as well as one for the illuminating tactile switch. I know you are busy with this but if its ok i'd like to ask you for input on occasion, i'm no engineer like i think it said on your site, i dont even have a degree, but i'm a stickler for certain detail. i've also seen someone with an accurate model to the in-game and i'm trying to get the file from him to work on this. This would be a first big project, and i intend to figure the whole thing out, eventually. Sorry if this is a mess for your thread, just thought i'd ask, i got lots of free time.
     
  31. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    @jellis359,
    The latch is one item which a prototype will tell a lot. The nylon is very strong, and flexible when compared to other plastics. I have beefed up all the material as much as possible in that area. The latch type is called an over-draw latch. What it means is once latched, any pulling pressure horizontally on the latch actually makes the latch hold tighter. Only pulling the lever past a certain point will release the latch. One of the nylon arms acts as spring, which has to be overcome for it to release.

    In addition to the latch, there are six mating magnets which hold the Pip-Boy closed temporarily while the latch is engages. You comments however did give me an idea, maybe I can figure out a good place to attach a threaded insert for a screw. This could be used as an anchor for a security cable.

    @Voltaire Surge,
    The current speaker I have shown is CUI, CDS-13138-SMT. I selected it because it is tiny, and PCB surface mount. (No cable).
    It is only 0.7W, which is tiny. But if driven correctly the spec says it can output 87dB. The frequency response is tweaked for voice, so you won't be pumping any bass from it. I am assuming that most of the radio in Fallout will still be tweaked to sound like old A/M radio. This type of sound should work well with this speaker. At this time I have decided to ditch the real FM radio. A real FM radio chip adds quite a bit of cost, not just in the FM chip, but the fact that I would have to add audio mixer. On top of that they require a 3-ft long antenna, which I won't have. So instead the radio tuner knob will tune through sounds pre-stored in the Android. Perhaps the companion app will even have FM radio, who knows.

    The small potentiometers I am using are: Bourns 3310 series. They are some of the smallest POTs I could find. The rotary encoders are TT Electronics EN12 series.
    The LEDs I am using have a color temperature of 2700K. That means they have a warm yellow glow instead of cold blue. I source my parts from Digikey and Mouser.com It isn't the cheapest way to develop a project, but I am not designing this for the mass market, I am designing it for myself.

    To a certain degree, being a sticker to details is that makes someone an engineer. 90% of what I know is self-taught. I went to school to be an electrical engineer, and self-taught myself mechanical engineering. (A decade designing products didn't hurt either) I do have to say that figuring out all the various moving components in this design took many hours of research. None of it is easy. It is all possible with enough time and thought thrown at it. Even then a good CAD design only is half of it, getting it made into a real thing can be just as hard, and require even more changes.
     
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  32. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    given what youhave shown so far is what made me think, maybe, if i use the right sized part i could getthe older model working? pretty much using yours as a sort of guide, and just kinda common sense. still wonder why its taken 7 years to get even this close with what we've had. i actually looked online to see how to solder, what pcb's were and how to make them (cept the proper lines, still confusing), i dont exactly have a CAD program, but i'm looking over the model so that when i do i can try and figure it out. i actually figured out whot to do with the hand piece last night, and where the select, power, and map controls are. either way, look forward to your next bit of progress, for now, i use paper, to get the overall idea of the parts placement

    also, what type of screen did you use? the 3000 A had a domed glass screen but the thin one you are using seems to save space a bunch.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
  33. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    You can have convex lens/ screens printed on a high res 3d printer on solid fill


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  34. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    Well i want it to feel just as real as zapwizards, i've seen someone use a domed piece before, but i feel it would take up space, and if so id have to push it up more in the casing so it doesnt take up too much space, the one zapwizard is using is very very thin, and it allows plenty of space to be left behind it. the thinner and smaller the functioning pieces the better. seen too many people make it but it be too bug inside or go right past the rim shielding to where it looks like its gunna fall out of the body. i mean the in game one is a straight up tiny tube tv piece, and thats probably heavy as crap on our arm XD but could they be see through and everything? i dont actually have my own 3d printer, i plan to make everything the right size on a 3d model and print it on shapeways
     
  35. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Voltaire Surge,
    I am using a 3.5" 320x240 LCD. It's a bit lower resolution then I want, but is readily available, has a glass capacative touch-screen, and full data sheets. If your only doing a one-off you can sometimes get away with a cheaper LCD from china, but you will have a heck of a time getting it to work.

    There are many project logs on the Pip-Boy 3000, some more functional then others. To get a curved screen for the 3000 you use the glass from a old slide viewer. Again search other people's 3000 project logs, many have done it with the curved glass.
    jellis359,
    I have seen "clear" 3D printed parts. They only become clear after lots of polishing, and even then they have lots of distortion. The resin material used also deteriorates very quickly.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  36. justy

    justy Active Member

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    Oh wow that's great


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  37. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    thanks again. i cant find just the lens, but it could work, do you think if i put the lens over the lcd it would look good or would it be all distorted? i actually plan to once im all done, make a list of all the parts, put a list of links, make the model public, and the wire paths for the pcb's, the size and shape for the pcb's, and the overall price, right now im just doing an information gather, get all the infor for pieces, sizes and all that, have an accurate model, and then go from there. that way, i can use mine as an example, have the files and a buyable printed model from shapeways online, and then evryone can go forth and make their own. and if people just want phone holders they can use one of the many phone holders already out there.
     
  38. Btechnician

    Btechnician New Member

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    Are you going to be waiting for Fallout 4 to be released before finishing up some things or does the release date not even hinder you?
     
  39. Btechnician

    Btechnician New Member

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    Wow just went back and and read everything I can't believe this is only started 3 weeks ago the progress and what you have done is amazing!
     
  40. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Btechnician,

    Part of me wants it in time for release, but in reality there is lots of both mechanical and electrical work left to do. And than there is a lot of time making prototyping and mechanical mock-ups. I also sort of want to know more than the short set of videos we have to see more of the how the Pip-boy works in Fallout 4 and what changed from Fallout 3.

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    21209607750_c835e9be58_c.jpg

    Jellis359, this no one is for you. But it's not a bad idea. By having a threaded insert inside the arm band, a cable can be attached to prevent the Pip-Boy from dropping to the ground if the latch were ever to open on accident. It only costs $1 and can be installed with a soldering iron.

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    20776617903_41a6d54d6e_c.jpg

    Today I redesigned the way the Holotapes work. I have decided to ditch the NFC tag idea.

    The new design will use a tiny cheap circuit board which is installed into the Holotape. This PCB has four contacts. Only two contacts will be required, so I will double up on them to help ensure contact. A small resistor to detect which unique holotape is installed. The beaglebone only needs to read this value to and perform an action based on the value.

    The holotape caddy has a PCB with a sping-loaded mating connector. This PCB is attached to the movable caddy, and will be wired to the motherboard. The PCB will actually help stiffen up the entire holotape caddy, as FR4 (PCB material) is very stiff.

    Why did I ditch the NFC? Because of many reasons:
    1) The smallest low-cost NFC tags I could find were still 25mm in diameter. To hide them inside the Holotape the holotape would have to become a complicated snap-together assembly, instead of just a simple 3D printed part.
    2) NFC requires a special antenna design and can be prone to failure if the antenna and tag don't end up just right.
    3) The NFC chip add a drain to the battery, with a resistor there is no extra drain.
    4) The NFC circuit itself requires design work, PCB space, has to be located in exactly the right spot.
    5) Simpler is always better.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  41. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    contacks and a spring loader so it comes out easier? love it!
     
  42. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Just an FYI, it is bad forum etiquette to quote a long multi-paragraph post, especially when it was just the last post up. It makes reading a the history of a post harder for others.

    Yep, the spring contacts also cost less then the NFC chip and require no extra support electronics. By putting a PCB inside the holotape deck that is mostly devoid of electronics I can add some cool visual effects to that PCB. For example I was trying to figure out a good location for a "Serial ID" tag. Something that showed the Pip-Boy manufacturer (Robotech) and a serial number area. Normally this would be done on an aluminum plate, similar to the Pip-Boy edition stand. However those Aluminum plates can be very expensive in low quantities. A plate could be laser etched of course, but even this costs around $5.
     
  43. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    You can get metal infused printer filaments for the plate. I know people who use it to make pcbs. Or you can laser cut and etch on aluminum painters tape or party tins. Ive done that.

    Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk
     
  44. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    jellis359

    What I meant is that I can use the PCB to actually print the manufacturer data. When doing text in copper on a PCB the end result is very sharp and high contrast. It would also be silver print on a black background which looks a lot like the aluminum photo exposed labels that they used on the Pip-boy edition. So there is no need to make a separate component.
    Eventually I will do a rendering of what it will look like, but for now check out this PCB business card to get the overall look.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  45. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    My bad man. Anyway, you use solid edge right? what 3d modelling software would you suggest for a beginner? i want to work on my model as soon as i can.
     
  46. zapwizard

    zapwizard Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Voltaire Surge, Solid Edge has a steep learning curve, not to mention that it is very expensive. I have access to it through my work. Prior to that I often used SketchUp, but I wouldn't recommend it for complex designs that require exact dimensions. 123D from Autodesk is a good solid molder for beginners, it is specifically geared towards 3D printing.
    I have been doing 3D modeling for over 20 years in one program or another. There is a lot to learn if you want to combine electronics and mechanical into a working package. But doing is the best way to learn.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  47. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    ahh ok, thanks. i pretty much know the parts i want to use inside it for the most part. all i need atm is to get accurate to game model and those that have them or could rip it from game dont want to share. XD i figured doing rather than seeing would be better too.

    and this is one of those moments im mad at my dad for putting linux on my computer
     
  48. jellis359

    jellis359 Jr Member

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    Don't forget about solidworks. Ive been using that since day one.
    Seems we need a sub thread for similar questions.

    Sent from my C811 4G using Tapatalk
     
  49. Btechnician

    Btechnician New Member

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    when this is all said and done you should look into making it weatherproof hell maybe even waterproof one day. only because in the fall out game you get rained on as well as swim with it. ;)
     
  50. Voltaire Surge

    Voltaire Surge Member

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    indeed would be cool. gotta make it work first. can u 3d print waterproof stuff?
     

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