BSG/NG Flight Jacket

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by Wakal, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Wakal

    Wakal Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    931
    My friend Bill was bored last week, and decided to paint a bit on one of his A2 jackets. He hasn't decided on the verbiage for the back yet...either "Semper Viper" or "Viper II: Not Your Father's Viper" :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Alex
     
  2. Sporak

    Sporak Sr Member Gone but not forgotten.

    Trophy Points:
    1,671
    Hey, Very cool.

    Frack Attack.
     
  3. SG Merc

    SG Merc Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    521
    Very neat work.

    What type of paint/process did your friend use? It works well.
     
  4. DL 44 Blaster

    DL 44 Blaster Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,730
    That's frackin' cool.. :thumbsup
     
  5. UFO

    UFO Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,231
    i love it. :)
    personally, i'd go with "Fight em' till ya can't." for the back, since it was a slogan from the series....
     
  6. Jedi Bailinkski

    Jedi Bailinkski Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    511
    I second that.
     
  7. RedTwoX

    RedTwoX Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,036
    Ha. That's brilliant :D That's a great idea, and well executed.
     
  8. Wakal

    Wakal Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    931
    I'll ask him what sort of paint he uses, and will pass on the slogan. I like that one, too :)




    A
     
  9. Wakal

    Wakal Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    931
    Jacket painting tips:

    Materials: lacquer thinner for prepping the leather and Cova Dye acrylic leather paints (available at any leather store). Regular artistsÂ’ acrylics (and even Model Master Acrylics) can be used if this is just a piece youÂ’re going to hang on a wall, but the Cova Dye paints are absolutely indispensable for a wearable jacket. This is due to their toughness and flexibility after drying.

    PRECISELY define the area to be painted (i.e., make a full-sized cut-out of the EXACT shape and trace it on the leather with a Sharpie pen).

    Using a lint-free cloth (like an old tube sock), clean that precisely-defined area with lacquer thinner. Get your cloth good and sopping wet with the thinner; the idea is to de-glaze the surface and also remove any residual dye and oils from the leather.

    Paint the entire area white. Start with a thin/watery coat and let dry, then add a second for opacity. This will give you a blank canvas to work on.

    Paint your design.

    You can leave your finished painting as-is; clear-coating isnÂ’t necessary.





    A
     

Share This Page