The downfall of physical media ??? ( where do you side ) glad to see it go or not

Psab keel

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I can't wait until 4K80 comes out! I bought the bootlegs blurays that were being sold on ebay a few years ago. I'm hoping those become available for 4K80 when that gets finished too. Gotta have my physical media. Especially for 3 of my all time favorite films!
 

HeartBlade

Sr Member
Not for me. I just burn shows to physical media until they decide to come out with it officially. If they don't, that's their problem, not mine.
True although you get labelled as one of Jack Sparrow's men riding the high seas lol.

It's forced obsolescence. Hollywood has been doing it for years.
True. Im feeling the sting more in terms of video games. For PC gaming, everything is digital now and the majority is connected to steam which means your library of games you bought for are dependent on a platform remaining active. Consoles still provide discs but with the updates, multiplayer features which require servers which will inevitably shut down, and propensity for developers to lose game files, its will be easier to play older (PS2 or earlier) games as they were originally intended to be played than more modern games after a couple years have passed.
 

Paul Andrew

Master Member
It's not forced obsolescence, it's an attempt at perpetual control. If you have to keep crawling back to Hollywood to see the content, they get to keep making money without doing any additional work. It's why everything is moving toward a subscription model these days.

Screw that.
Let's not kid ourselves, they spend a lot of money getting those subscription apps up and running them to get your monthly payment.
 

Psab keel

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Though as was said earlier in this thread, if your only "ownership" of a particular show or movie is through streaming, you're continually purchasing it until you die. Internet service provider, and monthly subscription to a streaming service are continuous expenses. Effectively you're renting the show or movie the rest of your life.

By comparison you could buy a Blu-ray and a player. One and done purchase. Sure you pay monthly for electricity, but that covers your entire home, not just your ability to watch television.

Creating a workforce to code and run the apps that stream is far more expensive than cranking out a few million physical discs, which by comparison are considered an outdated model. When technology advances, the production costs of the previous tech tends to fall off a cliff, making it dirt cheap because they just want to offload it. For a studio there's little money in physical media anymore which is why they're chasing after subscription models and charging a premium to get you to rent forever.

I'm happy to pay a fair price for a good service, but let's not forget that we're talking about disposable income. I don't think it's necessary to have to thank them after I pay them. If anything they should be thanking me for buying. That's how every other business works. When a customer buys from me, I express gratitude for their patronage. Not the other way around. Likewise when I worked for a company, I was expected to thank the customers because they too kept me fed and clothed. It was what kept me from losing my temper when they were nasty to me. I could recognize that even if they were being jerks, I was employed and that I should be grateful.
 
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joberg

Master Member
Very interesting article on the "Stanley Nolan Blog" (y) Must read for any adult film lovers! Let's face it; when was the last time you saw a good, adult film story:unsure: Not the ones that start with "Wham, Bam Thank you Ma'am":rolleyes:

"With that in mind, let's look ahead to what's on the menu for this year: four adaptations of comic books. One prequel to an adaptation of a comic book. One sequel to a sequel to a movie based on a toy. One sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a movie based on an amusement-park ride. One prequel to a remake. Two sequels to cartoons. One sequel to a comedy. An adaptation of a children's book. An adaptation of a Saturday-morning cartoon. One sequel with a 4 in the title. Two sequels with a 5 in the title. One sequel that, if it were inclined to use numbers, would have to have a 7 1/2 in the title."(Quotes from the original article).


"This was 2011. It could have also been 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, or this year. It literally hasn’t changed. But now, many of these sequels and adaptations are made as direct-to-streaming series to boost subscription numbers, which is now more important than box office numbers." (Quotes from the original article).

There's more and I urge everyone to read it;)
 

Psab keel

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
To me where Streaming really shines, is the type of content that's being produced. It's far more creatively diverse than what the studio systems have been cranking out in the last few decades.
 

CB2001

Master Member
It's not forced obsolescence, it's an attempt at perpetual control. If you have to keep crawling back to Hollywood to see the content, they get to keep making money without doing any additional work. It's why everything is moving toward a subscription model these days.

Screw that.
It’s forced obsolescence. By making DVD and Blu-Ray obsolete, it does what you just said, forces people to keep coming back to Hollywood to see the content.
 

asalaw

Sr Member
I’ve had two movies and an entire TV series disappear from my Apple library over the years, because you don’t really own copies of media you download—you’re paying basically for a revocable license. On the other hand, the studios can’t come into your home and take a disk off your shelf. Plus with physical media, there’s the first sale doctrine—you can sell the disk down the road, because that copy is your physical property. Just like you can sell an old book, or your CD collection.

Having said that, I really like the convenience of downloads, I like being able to watch them on any device, and I like not having an ever-expanding collection of disks cluttering my life. It’s a tradeoff. For certain titles that are particularly important to me, I’ll always have physical media as backups. But my days of collecting hordes of disks are over, I’m afraid.
 

Psab keel

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
One unexpected advantage of digital media is that it helped me become more selective about which films I felt were important enough to own a physical copy. Over the years I would always hone my media collection down to the essentials as my tastes or priorities changed. Moving or having to cut back on expendatures would typically help me to downsize the collection as needed, but knowing certain shows or movies were available to watch without having to take a disc off the shelf was a help too. It's also become less of a priority to have such a shelf as a display the way it once was. While I'd always loved the idea of having what amounted to a video store proudly available on my shelf, that notion is less appealing now, despite the fond memories I have of browsing the aisles at my local rentals.

I'm sure a lot of that is due to age too and as we've moved, displays aren't an option given the size of our living space. As much as I relish the days of renting a movie, I also recognize how times have changed and with it, my tastes for how I'm consuming pop culture.
 

Cephus

Sr Member
I’ve had two movies and an entire TV series disappear from my Apple library over the years, because you don’t really own copies of media you download—you’re paying basically for a revocable license. On the other hand, the studios can’t come into your home and take a disk off your shelf. Plus with physical media, there’s the first sale doctrine—you can sell the disk down the road, because that copy is your physical property. Just like you can sell an old book, or your CD collection.

Having said that, I really like the convenience of downloads, I like being able to watch them on any device, and I like not having an ever-expanding collection of disks cluttering my life. It’s a tradeoff. For certain titles that are particularly important to me, I’ll always have physical media as backups. But my days of collecting hordes of disks are over, I’m afraid.
I've been looking over some of my burned series in the last couple of days, deciding what I wanted to get on physical media. This morning, for some reason, I really wanted to get John Doe, a one-season wonder from the early 2000s. I went to Amazon and found that it's never been released. Hey, I tried, right? But at least if I wanted to, I could watch it, not have to find someone streaming it. I never lose out and Hollywood did by not providing it in a format I could purchase.

Their fault, not mine.
 

Too Much Garlic

Master Member
I can't wait until 4K80 comes out! I bought the bootlegs blurays that were being sold on ebay a few years ago. I'm hoping those become available for 4K80 when that gets finished too. Gotta have my physical media. Especially for 3 of my all time favorite films!
I just wish I could find someone to burn out the ones I've downloaded to bluray. I don't have the knowhow to do it.
 

el toro

Sr Member
Are your downloaded files iso ones? Then it’s pretty easy to burn to a Blu-ray Disc. But if not, then there are several steps needed to format the media file into an iso one.
 

CB2001

Master Member
Personally, I'm kinda miffed at the fact that I'll never have all four seasons of Halt and Catch Fire on physical release (as the first two seasons were released, and the last two weren't). Same is true with Stranger Things (have the first two seasons on DVD/Blu-Ray retro VHS box release, with Season 3 not released and Season 4 not looking to be either).
 

publiusr

Well-Known Member
There is a general trend away from ownership that I don’t like. John Deere fight sright to repair efforts. Even once a month toupees are sold as a “system”

Bah
 

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