The best Filler ( bondo, putty etc.) to use?

Darth Infamous

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hi,
Can anyone give me insight on the best product to use to fill and create your base model before detailing? Do most here use bondo or putty filler? Thanks

Carl
 

masterjedi322

Sr Member
I think it's definitely dependent on the situation. Bondo is a great filler for large holes, seams, etc, but it dries quite hard, which can make it difficult to sand after curing.

I've also used some other automotive spot putties that work well for large areas as well, and are easier to work with once they've dried, but they won't work for as large an area as Bondo will.

For smaller holes I've been using Squadron's green putty. Haven't had any problems with that.

Sean
 

Darth Infamous

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hi Sean,
Thanks a bunch for the advice. I wll try the stuff out. :)
Carl


Originally posted by Darth Infamous@Mar 20 2005, 05:32 PM
Hi,
Can anyone give me insight on the best product to use to fill and create your base model before detailing? Do most here use bondo or putty filler? Thanks

Carl
[snapback]948722[/snapback]​
 

Watson

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I mainly use Bondo Glazing Putty. Works on resin, or plastic or whatever :)

JDH
 

star-art

Sr Member
Perfect timing for this question, I've been getting a lot of practical experience with this subject lately. Bondo is noxious stuff, it's made from polyester resin which is just toxic. Don't use it indoors and even if outdoors wear a respirator.

Bondo spot putty is lacquer-based and also noxious. Spread it only in very thin layers and don't try to build up anything with it. I am told it shrinks over time so I no longer use it.

Master modeler Dave Meriman says never use "hobby" putties but intead use Evercoat 2-part epoxy filler for large gaps and structural work. You can get this at auto body supply shops and it comes in two varieties -- EuroSoft and SpotLite. One is harder to sand than the other. Be sure to wear a respirator and don't breathe the fumes or the dust when sanding (better to wet sand).

You can get more info at http://www.CultTVMan.com and look for Dave's scratchbuilding articles (AWESOME info BTW.).

Once you have the surface roughly in shape, finish it off with NitroStan lacquer-based touch-up putty. I couldn't get this locally but my friend Will Babington recommended PPG DFL1 putty from an auto body supply and, let me tell you, this stuff is awesome.

Like Bondo spot putty, it's an air-dry, lacquer-based material (no mixing). It's the consistency of a tube paint (oil or acrylic) and can be wiped on. I put masking tape down either side of the seam (this stuff makes a mess) then wipe it on with a small piece of paper towel. Wait a few minutes then carefully peel off the tape. Let it dry for several hours and then wet sand (DON'T breath the dust from this stuff or it will damage your lungs permanently.). Repeat to build up more layers as needed, though for me two passes usually gives me a surface ready for primer.

So, bottom line: To fill gaps and fix problems, use Evercoat 2-part epoxy. When that is done, go over this with NitroStan or DFL1 spot putty. Then prime, then paint.

HTH. . . :)
 

Darth Infamous

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
StarArt- WOW great info. I really appreciate it and I will take the precautions in using this stuff. The link is great too. :)

Carl


Originally posted by star-art@Mar 22 2005, 02:06 AM
Perfect timing for this question, I've been getting a lot of practical experience with this subject lately. Bondo is noxious stuff, it's made from polyester resin which is just toxic. Don't use it indoors and even if outdoors wear a respirator.

Bondo spot putty is lacquer-based and also noxious. Spread it only in very thin layers and don't try to build up anything with it. I am told it shrinks over time so I no longer use it.

Master modeler Dave Meriman says never use "hobby" putties but intead use Evercoat 2-part epoxy filler for large gaps and structural work. You can get this at auto body supply shops and it comes in two varieties -- EuroSoft and SpotLite. One is harder to sand than the other. Be sure to wear a respirator and don't breathe the fumes or the dust when sanding (better to wet sand).

You can get more info at http://www.CultTVMan.com and look for Dave's scratchbuilding articles (AWESOME info BTW.).

Once you have the surface roughly in shape, finish it off with NitroStan lacquer-based touch-up putty. I couldn't get this locally but my friend Will Babington recommended PPG DFL1 putty from an auto body supply and, let me tell you, this stuff is awesome.

Like Bondo spot putty, it's an air-dry, lacquer-based material (no mixing). It's the consistency of a tube paint (oil or acrylic) and can be wiped on. I put masking tape down either side of the seam (this stuff makes a mess) then wipe it on with a small piece of paper towel. Wait a few minutes then carefully peel off the tape. Let it dry for several hours and then wet sand (DON'T breath the dust from this stuff or it will damage your lungs permanently.). Repeat to build up more layers as needed, though for me two passes usually gives me a surface ready for primer.

So, bottom line: To fill gaps and fix problems, use Evercoat 2-part epoxy. When that is done, go over this with NitroStan or DFL1 spot putty. Then prime, then paint.




HTH. . .  :)
[snapback]949520[/snapback]​
 

DARKSIDE72

Sr Member
I use epoxy putty almost exclusivly now. It doesn't shrink, dries fast and very hard, it can be sanded/wet sanded, drilled, tapped. It is sticky though, the trick to using it is to get it onto the model, apply some vicks vapor rub to your finger or object you wish to smooth the putty with, smooth the putty out. The vicks doesn't mix with the putty, you just take a cloth and wipe it off when the putty dries.
 

star-art

Sr Member
That's a cool trick, thanks. Fortunately I have never needed to use epoxy yet, one of the benefits of working with lasercut parts is they fit together too precisely to leave major gaps. ;)

BTW, I owe you an e-mail, am trying to get caught up. :)
 
Top