Question about Resin Casting

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by 19yellow72, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. 19yellow72

    19yellow72 New Member

    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hey all!

    I've posted a few things here and there. Mostly admire all your work. One of the things I like doing is making scratch built miniatures. If you've seen the mini proton pack floating around out there. That's me!

    I mold and then cast a lot of my things from resin. One of my upcoming ideas is a smaller scale Captain America Shield. Sure I could paint once the resin is cured. BUT! My question is...

    Has any one ever done layers of resin. For the Shield, I was thinking doing each ring as dyed layer of resin. Letting it cure, then pouring the next layer on top of that.
    Does that work? Will it bond or separate?

    Thoughts are very welcome.

    And keep up the good work all!
     
  2. Joy

    Joy Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    It will work, provided you take some precautions. I do slush casts in multiple layers all the time. The big thing will be protecting the already cured resin from moisture. After resin cures and even while curing, it can absorb ambient humidity and this will cause any resin curing in contact with it to make bubbles. I'd say use the fastest setting resin you can feasibly use, make sure you're working in a super low humidity space and maybe stow the mold inside a container that's been filled with a dry gas blanket between pours.
     
  3. Stivie

    Stivie Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    635
    Is there a suggested wait time for cure between layers when doing a slush cast?
     
  4. Fullresin Props

    Fullresin Props New Member

    Trophy Points:
    2
    when i was casting a helmet, i needed to add a little more smooth cast 65D. but once the newly poored 65D cured, it didnt stick to the existing cured 65D. for it to adhere i would of had to poor more before whats already in the helmet mold cured. And i think it would be a little difficult for you to cast each individual layer of the shield to perfectly fit flat on the other layers.
     
  5. Joy

    Joy Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    I usually do my layers once the existing layer has gotten to what I call rubber stage. it's not gonna come off on a glove if you touch it, but it's still floppy/squishy. If you need to pour onto a fully cured layer, just score the surface where the two layers will join with an x-acto knife.
     
  6. 19yellow72

    19yellow72 New Member

    Trophy Points:
    3
    You all are fantastic! Thank you for the ideas. I'll try a few different things and if it works, Hooray! If not. No big loss right? But it appears based on all your advice that it's doable.
    So we shall see. Once I get to the point I'll make sure to update with progress of a success or failure. Either way.

    Thank you!
     

Share This Page