3D Printing Help

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by Cooper648, May 7, 2012.

  1. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    I have a question that has been on my mind for a while now. If I buy a rep-rap 3D printer, or any printer with a small build grid and I want to print, lets say a full scale ironman helmet, it would be to big to print the full object, so could I slice or cut the helmet into smaller pieces with a program and then print the pieces and glue them together to construct the full helmet? Also could someone recommend me a good 3D modeling program or CAD software that could do this? Thank you!
     
  2. Canobi

    Canobi Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    1,456
    Hi there

    I looked into 3D printing a lot recently and was considering getting one of these from reprap

    http://www.reprapcentral.com/Mendel/RepRap-Laser-Cut-Mondo-Kit/flypage.tpl.html

    With a print area that big it'll do a full helmet in one, and for a 3D printer of that size it's pretty cost effective.


    As for 3D programs, I use Rhino 3D as it has a great range of formats you can save your files as. I haven't had it for long, so I'm still getting my head around some of it, but I've found it to be quite user friendly.


    *edit* * slow refresh!
     
  3. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    This reprap printer your looking at is very nice. Kinda expensive though, im looking for something in the $100 - $500 range but im starting to think there isnt a good one for that price with a large build grid. Ill be checking out rhino 3D also soon.
     
  4. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
  5. DrewSmith007

    DrewSmith007 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    967
    I would wait on that printer until they have ironed out all the bugs.

    Are you up for putting one together and calibrating everything yourself? For around $600 you can get this: V2 Linear Prusa Kit with Gregs & .35mm Nozzle

    you just have to put it together, get a power supply (a PC supply will work) and cut about $30 worth of metal.

    I'm ordering one at the end of the week.
     
  6. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    I've done a little research on the Maki and it seems good for a beginner like me even if it has a bug or 2. The one your talking about is a little advanced for me by thank you for the suggestion.
     
  7. cboath

    cboath Master Member

    Trophy Points:
    3,276
    As to the original post, you can cut up a 3d object and print it in pieces and glue it together. Shouldn't be a problem. You just have to cut your 3D object up in 3D modeling software. Whether it's Rhino, Solidworks, pro-e, 3ds max, Maya, Inventor, et al, you should be able to hack up an object to get it into pieces that will fit your printing plate.
     
  8. Canobi

    Canobi Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    1,456
    Hi again

    I forgot to say this in my ealier post.

    Always check the print definition before buying if possible, while the price might be good, there might be a lot more finishing work later on. Ask the company your buying from for a sample or close up pic of a sample made by the printer your interested in. If they try to talk you out of it the printer probably isn't as good as they say it is.

    I looked long and hard for a kit printer that could match some of the big boys out there for quality. The reason I chose the printer in my other post is the fact it's accurate to 0.01mm with a choice of a .5 or .25mm head (good choices for coverage and detail), plus the enormous print area makes for a lot of bang for your buck.


    *edit* * this is a busy thread!
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  9. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    Sweet! Thank you, so the size of the build plate doesn't matter then, great!
     
  10. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    Good advice, I'll do a little digging to find out how precise it is. Man people on the RPF are so nice! Thank you for being nice to a beginner.
     
  11. Canobi

    Canobi Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    1,456
    Hey no prob, I'm pretty new to prop making myself. I just happen to like engineering and technology and knew a thing or two about the subject.

    The print area for the one I linked by the way is:

    H=18 x W=12 x H=11 inches and can print a Vader helmet in one go....lovely :thumbsup
     
  12. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    Prop making has been a dream of mine for a while now, I have worked on a few helmeted but they pretty much failed because I couldn't get them to look the exact way I wanted them too, I hope 3D printing helps make it easier as I am learning CAD and 3D modeling.
     
  13. Woodlake

    Woodlake Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    566
    I do exactly this with projects for my DIY cnc machine. I model in Rhino and use the "wirecut" command to slice it where needed.
     
  14. exoray

    exoray Master Member

    Trophy Points:
    2,631
    The .01mm accuracy is a 'placement' accuracy nothing to do with the print resolution... And I personally highly doubt the machine as constructed will actually hold that accuracy repeatably... With a .5mm head the best accuracy you can expect is well, .5mm, same with a .25mm head the best possible accuracy is .25mm... Neither head will produce anywhere near 0.01mm accuracy...

    I doesn't matter if the steppers and machine can hold a 0.01mm accuracy of moment if the print head can't print that small... Print a .25mm line, move over or even up .05mm and print again and you are not going to get a .30mm part you are going to get a stacked mess, of two .25mm lines...
     
  15. Pro Mod

    Pro Mod Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    847
    I know it's out of the price range but for a starting price of $1,499.00, this looks like one of the best machines I've seen;

    www.x-object.com
    www.x-object.com

    The video of the toy being repaired is a little surreal, but the process and resolution for the home user does look good.
     
  16. Pro Mod

    Pro Mod Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    847
  17. Canobi

    Canobi Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    1,456
    Oops! Thanks for clearing that up exoray, I must of miss read it. Sorry all.
     
  18. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    Testing out a bunch of 3D modeling programs, this is going to take a while...
     
  19. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    Could you guys suggest a good 3D modeling program for a beginner like me that is easy to learn?
     
  20. DrewSmith007

    DrewSmith007 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    967
  21. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    This looks perfect! Ill test this out later today and let you know what its like. Thanks for the advice.
     
  22. Cooper648

    Cooper648 Member

    Trophy Points:
    191
    I'm probably going yo purchase a Makibox A6 3D printer in a month or so once they start officially shipping.
     
  23. NormanF

    NormanF Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    2,516
  24. Talaaya

    Talaaya Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    686
    I'm not sure what would be easiest for a beginner, but Maya is fairly straightforward and one of the most widely used programs out there and as a result there are countless tutorials available (this is also true for other big programs like 3ds Max, etc. and you can also use Zbrush for 3d printing but that's not so much for beginners). I use Maya on a daily basis for my job and would be happy to answer any questions you have about it and how to make it work with 3d printing.

    Currently I'm using 3d printing to make a set of armor and I can say for sure that it is quite possible to cut a model into pieces and glue them together. I had to cut the helmet into four pieces and, although a bit warped from the curing process, they glued together very well. Imperfections in the print can be fixed with bondo.

    I don't know about other materials and 3d printers, but the Zcorp printer material is very easily superglued together and is super strong. As far as I can tell it's a gypsum based plaster material. This material is only used in Zcorp printers though.

    I could write a ton more about the whole process. I guess I should probably just write up a tutorial/general tips thread or something. If you have any questions I'm more than happy to help anyone.
     
  25. xl97

    xl97 Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,711
    getting a hobby,extrusion type printer will not give you the same ype of prints/results that you get from say, Shapeways for example.. as that is a different process.... just an FYI on expectations..
    Are you looking for a printer for 'fun'? as in you want to play around, print stuff, learn about it.. dont mind supporting it and tinkering with it to fix it, or work through bugs/errors..etc.. then one of the lower end printers might be ok for you... (lots of these at my local maker space)

    ..however if you are looking at the printer as a 'tool' to help you with projects.. instead of the printer actually BEING the project.. you might want to look into a higher end model with support and a nice community behind it.
    (replicator perhaps)

    which we also have at the local makerspace.. (same with a Stratasys, very high end 3D printer) :)


    things to keep in mind.. filament it uses (ABS, PLA..etc) .... what kind? where to source? costs?
    there are other costs too..

    As far software...Id say to get th ebest answers.. it depends on the type of things you want to model?

    Most popular apps are:

    Solidwork, AutoCAD. 3DSM, Rhino..etc..
     

Share This Page