2001: a Space Odyssey. The EVA pod maquette

3Dsf

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Dunno where this should go, because it doesn't really fit any of the broad categories on the RPF. It's not a screen-used prop, it's not a replica, it's not a "studio scale" model.

Anyway. An actual production maquette of the 2001: a Space Odyssey EVA pod was discovered by Propstore, who are auctioning it off. I was lucky enough to examine it and write up some notes for the benefit of the community. Big thanks to Tim and Brandon at Propstore.


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image.jpg
 
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Pyramidrep

Sr Member
3Dsf,
I saw the listing on Propstore a while ago and wondered why it hadnt been mention on the forum here before now. Maybe there was a bit of scepticism as to its authenticity.

Great analysis of the prop in your article. You mentioned that the prop might have a hollow core but are the ear muff piece(s) removable?.
 

joberg

Legendary Member
Great news and article Neil. Maybe jelutong wood was used instead of cedar:unsure: After the Aries-1B model, the Space Station V landing bay, we have now the original EVA Pod maquette :cool::cool:(y)(y) One day, Neil, someone will show up with parts of another model from that wonderful movie...one day;)
 

3Dsf

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Perhaps. I'm not sure how common jelutong was in Britain in the 1960s. Plus isn't it usually a paler colour? It's not a dark orange anyway.
 

joberg

Legendary Member
Perhaps. I'm not sure how common jelutong was in Britain in the 1960s. Plus isn't it usually a paler colour? It's not a dark orange anyway.
Yes, color can change with aging; going toward a "darker" tone. As for its use in the U.K. studio at the time; only an old model maker could have an answer on that one. I know that Martin Bower usage of jelutong wood is ubiquitous in his models.
Here's a pic I found on line. Seems to me that it's the 1/6th scale model with a puppet of Poole in the arms of the EVA Pod:unsure:

1667487231027.png
 
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3Dsf

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Yes, color can change with aging; going toward a "darker" tone. As for its use in the U.K. studio at the time; only an old model maker could have an answer on that one. I know that Martin Bower usage of jelutong wood is ubiquitous in his models.
Here's a pic I found on line. Seems to me that it's the 1/6th scale model with a puppet of Poole in the arms of the EVA Pod:unsure:

Interesting! I think the picture's too small to say with certainty, but it does look like it could be the shooting miniature and not the full-sized pod. I'm not sure, though, as the picture's a bit crunchy. If it is a miniature, the folds of the suit fabric are really well done.

Incidentally the maquette auctioned off for 20,000 squids. A little bit more than I could afford!
 
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Pyramidrep

Sr Member
If I had to hazard a guess, judging by the colour of the exposed wood where the front light was, I would have said it was Beech. Good for wood turning and carving . The sphere was made up of several different blocks of wood glued together . There's an image in Adam Johnsons Book showing the more finished engineered model in its raw form, the grain cross patterns on the wood blocks clearly visible. In that case, it's looks more like oak. I imagine that since the craftsmen who built it were of the old school Engineers/ Toolmakers ( supremely skilled) in white coats , English Oak was their wood of choice.

Those Polaroids are fantastic. Looks like there is still a treasure trove of images yet to be published..( thank you, Joberg)






.
 

flimzy

Sr Member
Great news and article Neil. Maybe jelutong wood was used instead of cedar:unsure: After the Aries-1B model, the Space Station V landing bay, we have now the original EVA Pod maquette :cool::cool:(y)(y) One day, Neil, someone will show up with parts of another model from that wonderful movie...one day;)
I would say jelutong is the right call I can’t say for the 60s but the 70s till today it a basic supply in UK architectural and studio shops. I cut my teeth on it/ and my fingers) Martin Bower was the first person to offer me a job in the industry 35 years ago. And taught me to use a table saw.I imagine who ever made this model would have been in the art department and got help from the chippy shop as the art department do have machines. So it’s possible it could be any timber but my money would be jelly
 
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Pro Mod

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I would say jelutong is the right call I can’t say for the 60s but the 70s till today it a basic supply in UK architectural and studio shops. I cut my teeth on it/ and my fingers) Martin Bower was the first person to offer me a job in the industry 35 years ago. And taught me to use a table saw.I imagine who ever made this model would have been in the art department and got help from the chippy shop as the art department do have machines. So it’s possible it could be any timber but my money would be jelly
Back in 1977 I crafted soap and shampoo bottle models from Jelutong as a trainee modelmaker. The ridiculously skilled patternmakers I worked with said it was a standard material in the industry. However to me, the bare timber looks like beech.
 

Pro Mod

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
If I had to hazard a guess, judging by the colour of the exposed wood where the front light was, I would have said it was Beech. Good for wood turning and carving . The sphere was made up of several different blocks of wood glued together . There's an image in Adam Johnsons Book showing the more finished engineered model in its raw form, the grain cross patterns on the wood blocks clearly visible. In that case, it's looks more like oak. I imagine that since the craftsmen who built it were of the old school Engineers/ Toolmakers ( supremely skilled) in white coats , English Oak was their wood of choice.

Those Polaroids are fantastic. Looks like there is still a treasure trove of images yet to be published..( thank you, Joberg)






.
From its colour I've always thought it was mahogany, and because its tighter grain makes it easier to carve.
 

joberg

Legendary Member
If I had to hazard a guess, judging by the colour of the exposed wood where the front light was, I would have said it was Beech. Good for wood turning and carving . The sphere was made up of several different blocks of wood glued together . There's an image in Adam Johnsons Book showing the more finished engineered model in its raw form, the grain cross patterns on the wood blocks clearly visible. In that case, it's looks more like oak. I imagine that since the craftsmen who built it were of the old school Engineers/ Toolmakers ( supremely skilled) in white coats , English Oak was their wood of choice.

Those Polaroids are fantastic. Looks like there is still a treasure trove of images yet to be published..( thank you, Joberg)






.
Indeed and now that Doug Trumbull passed away, I wonder when we're going to see his throve of pictures/negatives/polaroid from his stint on the movie:unsure:(y)
 

Pyramidrep

Sr Member
From its colour I've always thought it was mahogany, and because its tighter grain makes it easier to carve.
Pro Mod,
Apologies for not responding sooner ( was on holiday abroad escaping the grey, wet weather). I take your point about the tight grain in mahogany being good for carving/ shaping but looking at that image again, it’s looks the right colour side of oak. I would have thought colour of mahogany (raw) veered towards a deeper shades of brown/ sienna. In either case, it’s a very difficult shape to produce in hardwood and credit to the great craftpersons who produced it.

92D5B0D4-C55C-4A05-9595-CAE15D080A95.jpeg


It’s strange that they didn’t use acrylic which was used in a smaller version (3”) of the pod and also on the other craft ( including the huge Discovery).
 

Pyramidrep

Sr Member
Indeed and now that Doug Trumbull passed away, I wonder when we're going to see his throve of pictures/negatives/polaroid from his stint on the movie:unsure:(y)
Joberg,
Yep. He gave a a tantalising glimpse of his archive on that MOMI video/ discussion a number of years ago. We’ll probably never see everything but even partial publication of some of it would be great.

And then of course we’ll be looking for the same with Silent Running, Close Encounters of the Third , Star Trek-The Motion Picture and ……. Oh yeah , that dystopian movie from 1982 … Blade Somethingorother. .
 

joberg

Legendary Member
The big Discovery was made out of wood...even, it seems, the modules all along the spine. It's true that the pic showing the 1/6 EVA Pod looks a lot like oak.;) Acrylic is such a pain to work with; I did my 1/6 Pod using just that and every time I had to cut something out, or drill holes, I was praying to the Gods of model makingo_O:p
 

Pyramidrep

Sr Member
The big Discovery was made out of wood...even, it seems, the modules all along the spine………
Joberg,
You’re right. I should have paid better attention to Adam Johnson’s book this morning.
I see though that on the smaller 15 foot Discovery model ( if you can call it small) that they used an acrylic ball for the Command Sphere.
I have a little experience with Acrylic now and I agree it’s a “ pig” to work with. I‘d take wood over it any day.

1EBD3282-E8CE-484F-BCDF-783F5BECF4AC.jpeg
 

joberg

Legendary Member
Yes, the "small Discovery" was indeed in acrylic. Here's another pic of that 1/6 EVA with the small puppet attached to its arms + the first one posted above, but in another angle.
I don't know if it's the genuine article...:unsure: Were they testing for that stunt, or the plan was to use a model for that one?

1668273173586.png


1668274154616.png
 
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Pyramidrep

Sr Member
I don't know if it's the genuine article...:unsure: Were they testing for that stunt, or the plan was to use a model for that one?
The top image doesn’t look right IMO. Something off about it even if it was an early test. Is it the same model as shown in your bottom image? I would say No. The astronaut figure in the top image looks crude and like something from an existing toy set. The figure below (if it a model ) is very finely done.
There are also some differences in the pod details. For example compare the detail on the small inset thruster.
DC55CB73-931A-4272-9C70-59D7E9F10AFE.jpeg

7C6B3001-17D9-4936-84A8-90FE6E1287E5.jpeg

Does the surface of the pod look uneven in both photographs ( particularly in the lower image) or is that down to the quality of the images?
 

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