The Escape Pod Project

Dimitri-Ajith

Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks! Not using Rhino at the moment, I am still a old fashioned Polygonmodeler (Lightwave). But with doing more and more 3D prints, and with revisions of models it gets a bit anoying. And features likes this, makes me want to learn something new. But I am stuck to this program like almost 22 years now I think.. (realising now it is a crazy long time)
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Progress, more details, styrene and kit parts.

I like the idea that these mechanical details on Pod are some sort of deployable fins for control in the upper atmosphere. So I made sure to leave the tips of the triangular details floating a bit rather than conformed to the curve of the hull. On the original model these may have been wing parts from a Phantom kit, on mine they were scratch built from styrene.

Here a tip, before glueing down styrene plating it should be curved a bit to conform better to the curved hull. I found a good way to do this is to use a 1/2" steel rod and a pad of dense floor matte foam. Use the rod like a rolling pin to press the styrene into the foam. The more pressure and repetitions the more curved the styrene will become. You can even get a conical curve by pressing down harder on the side that goes toward the narrower end of the cone.
 

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DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Gettin' Jiggy With It!

As I mentioned before, it's become obvious that the 5 quart paper paint buckets I used to form the hull aren't the same proportions and size as the paper buckets used on the original model. I'm okay with it, but it does require some modifications of the doner kit parts to get them to fit. My hull is smaller in diameter than the original and the place this is having the most impact is on the tail end with all the engine details, particularly the fit of the Sealab frames. In order to not overhang the edge of the base surface more than desired the frames needed to be cut down, but in a way that they will still fit together cleanly. I decided to trim the frames down using the table saw. To hold them in just the right position to get the necessary 45 degree cut I made a little jig out of scrap acrylic and bits of styrene strip. The styrene forms curbs and blocks that align the frame and a top clamping plate is screwed down holding the area to be cut, preventing it from vibrating and shattering. The jig and frame are then run through the saw using the guide fence.

It's difficult to see in this picture but on the right side of the frame is the table saw guide fence, but it is made out of clear 1/2" Plexiglas.

The result is all four frames trimmed just as needed, and fitting together cleanly!
 

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joberg

Master Member
Thanks for that tuto Dave:)...but when I saw the size of your blade, I said to myself "Dave has nerves of steel"!!:D I think they should make miniature machines for us model-makers (maybe they exist already).
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks for that tuto Dave:)...but when I saw the size of your blade, I said to myself "Dave has nerves of steel"!!:D I think they should make miniature machines for us model-makers (maybe they exist already).
It's not nerves of steel, its ***** of brass!

It's not a problem to do very fine cutting work on a big saw as long as the proper care is taken. The plastics cutting blade on my table saw (that type of blade is a must!) has a narrow kerf and is very sharp. The biggest concern was keeping the little finger of the Sealab casting from chattering and shattering, hence the clamping plate. Worked out great.

Yes, there are mini table saws made for model work, I've owned several over the years. Some are okay (Jarmac made a good one) but I got use to doing small precision work on full size equipment. I did design a custom fence for my saw that allows my to adjust the cut in .001" increments. That helps.
 
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joberg

Master Member
Thanks for the link division 6:) Dave, yes I understand, I'm still trying to develop ***** of brass:D I think I'll stick to the big machine for big project. That pod is looking better and better by the day!
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Sorry guys, Photobucket is refusing to let photos link unless I pay them $400 a year. Not gonna happen! I'll try to start replacing the linked photos with uploads directly to the RPF but it'll take awhile! You can still view each photo by clicking on it but it's a PITA!
 
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Lear60man

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Sorry guys, Photobucket is refusing to let photos link unless I pay them $400 a year. Not gonna happen! I'll try to start replacing the linked photos with uploads directly to the RPF but it'll take awhile! You can still view each photo by clicking on it but it's a PITA!
Ive been seeing this on various forums over the last couple of weeks. I guess they changed their profit model from great free online hosting, to crappy slow loading ad heavy, to 'you will pay' because the ad thingy didnt work.
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I'd be happy to pay for service. Pay to be ad free, $2.50 a month is reasonable. Even maybe pay $100 a year to be able to link from third party sites, but $400 a year is ridiculous. I will start posting the pictures directly to the RPF. The biggest hassle is going to be going back and updating previous posts.
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Does anyone have an extra one of these nozzles they can spare from the Airfix 1/144 Saturn V? I have two and need three. Thanks!
 

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eagle1

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Does anyone have an extra one of these nozzles they can spare from the Airfix 1/144 Saturn V? I have two and need three. Thanks!
Hi Dave, I have 7 of these so no problem in sending you one. PM me your details & I'll get it out to asap.
Stu
 

DaveG

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Stu, thanks for the offer, a member here in California is sending me one. But I greatly appreciated it!

Many thanks to Jeff (satazius) for the part.

This community is top notch!
 
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