RookFett's MPC 22" Eagle Transporter Build

Mikey29211

New Member
Noob here, I have two kit's but have to wait until my house renovation before I can start, I'm pretty fair building straight from the box, I do however suck at painting. I have to ask that you high skill level builders could maybe make a short video showing how you mask and paint certain parts like the CM black anti glare panels or the under side of the shoulder pods etc. Thanks in advance
 

RookOmega

New Member
Noob here, I have two kit's but have to wait until my house renovation before I can start, I'm pretty fair building straight from the box, I do however suck at painting. I have to ask that you high skill level builders could maybe make a short video showing how you mask and paint certain parts like the CM black anti glare panels or the under side of the shoulder pods etc. Thanks in advance
Would love to do some videos - but not setup for that atm - there are tons of videos on youtube - like this one,


but - here are my tips:

Those two areas look scarier than they are - but they actually were quite easy to paint, since they have clearly defined edges, which are mostly straight. Compound curves are tricky - but careful use of tape is what you need.

As with any masking job, it really takes longer to mask than it is to paint it! - for example, for the pods, it took me about 1 hour to do all four, and about 60 seconds to paint it black...

By taking your time initially in the masking, you save yourself a lot of grief, and come out with nice sharp lines.

My method for painting them:

Model Prep -

Wash the parts!

Use a good primer - than paint your base coat.

I like to put a seal over that - acrylic spray or gloss coat - it helps to fix error due to over-spray or runs.

with that - I commence masking operations.


First thing you need to get is Tamiya masking tapes - different sizes are perfect. (6,10, and 18mm) are perfect. The edge is razor sharp and they pull up easily without pulling your paint. I use this type for the actual edge, then use cheaper 3M blue painters tape to cover the rest.

https://www.tamiyausa.com/articles/feature.php?article-id=222

If the area is to large for tape, use plastic wrap, sealing with the blue tape, with the yellow tape as the edge.

Have a super sharp xacto knife - and a good cutting mat (I use one that is just for tape jobs, so I don't get containment's on the tape) - the mat serves two other purposes, takes some of the "stick" off the tape, which helps in not pulling paint off the model, and helps cut up the tape in interesting ways for the masking job.

Sometimes you can cut the tape on the model - but I don't like doing that.

(if you look at my beak photos above showing the painting for the windows, you will notice tiny little squares of tape on the clear window part - that is how I masked the curved section)

nice steel ruler to help measure and guide the cuts to be straight.

Get a dental tool to push down the edge of the tape for a tight seal - I use a Woodson 2 - but you could a shaped toothpick. The added benefit is that you can use it for putty work - I highly recommend you get a bunch of different ones for model work - they come in handy more than you think.

http://www.hu-friedy.com/products/2-woodson-composite-instrument.html

I pull tape to size, place it on the mat, slice it as measured, then place the edge, following the lines on the part. I try to make the initial cut the entire length, so measuring is helpful, especially if the mat is marked with a ruler.

For curves, use multiple pieces, overlapping, make them small and follow the curve.

after that, I use my magnifying googles to look at the edges (eyes not that great :( ) - to make sure the lines are still sharp and on target. Don't be afraid to pull up the tape and re-apply - you can do it a few times without messing it up.

then you use the woodson or toothpick to "burnish" the edge down - but don't press to hard - you can mess up the lines.

My work flow is to mask everything that is going to be painted in the color I am going to shoot, so if I am shooting red, I mask all the red bits, than spray away.

I mix up a nice mixture of paint and thinner, like milk, for use in my double action airbrush.

I try not to spray to directly on the tape, there is always the chance of forcing paint under, try to stay perpendicular to the edges when spraying..

I use air to help dry it, and then after about a 30 second wait or so - I peel back the tape on itself, using tweezers and the tip of the knife to peel it up.

Don't let the paint/tape stay on too long, it might dry together, and if when you pull it, you might pull up the paint along with it and get a mess.

finally - practice, practice, practice!

If I find I have some paint leftover in the airbrush, I pull out an old model to practice on - better to do that than waste the paint by dumping it.

Hope this helps!
 
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mcusanelli

Active Member
Absolutely fantastic build, looks like it could be used for filming! Thanks for showing your build process too:)! Very informative, and professional!
 
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