Limited Run Rick Deckard Blade Runner 1982 Trench Coat By ELS

Jameel Ur

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thank you FOR sharing images Mechanismo.
This collar is not straight as shown in other brands images.
The collar is high from back and narrow from front with slightly curvature.
I got your point, I'll develop a new collar with ribbing, this one was only for shaping and sizing.
I saw Egon coats with different angle images but I haven't seen any collar folded on back image as below.
I'm trying to get collar perfect look, like fold over and curvature look.
BladeRunner.1982 2.jpg
BladeRunner.1982.6.jpg
 

Jamesfett

Sr Member
I am no expert. I owned at one time three different versions of the Tomenosuke Blade Runner blaster that all supposedly had changes. I could not see any when looking at all three together.

Having said that, it looks awesome!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Tweaks to make, but looks incredible.

Still so excited about this.
 

dbowker3d

New Member
Hey guys,
Small update.
I just wanted to check out collar height and length.
Please avoid ribbing and decoration stitching.

View attachment 1570675 View attachment 1570676 View attachment 1570677 View attachment 1570678
This is all really looking great! My only comment is that I feel certain that the original had a thin layer of quilting under the surface (or between the outer layer and lining. All the stills posted (to me) indicate this. I see this serving two purposes: bulks up the profile a bit but doesn’t add weight. Probably a 1/4" layer of dacron. And plus, it was the 80s, right? The "look" harkened back to the 30s-40s, but everything back in the 80s was silky and puffy to some degree!

Beyond the 80s angle there are a few practical reasons that might come into play: It would allow the outer layer to be a little softer and thus flow more easily.

One final thought: they HAD to had given the whole thing some kind or moisture sealing given that it's raining the entire film.
 

Jameel Ur

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
This is all really looking great! My only comment is that I feel certain that the original had a thin layer of quilting under the surface (or between the outer layer and lining. All the stills posted (to me) indicate this. I see this serving two purposes: bulks up the profile a bit but doesn’t add weight. Probably a 1/4" layer of dacron. And plus, it was the 80s, right? The "look" harkened back to the 30s-40s, but everything back in the 80s was silky and puffy to some degree!

Beyond the 80s angle there are a few practical reasons that might come into play: It would allow the outer layer to be a little softer and thus flow more easily.

One final thought: they HAD to had given the whole thing some kind or moisture sealing given that it's raining the entire film.
As I said, ribbing and decoration stitching not correct yet, I was working on collar looks, design details.
The collar has quilting with sponge foam underneath ( see the reference image) that gives softer puffy look.
IMG_4823.JPG


As well, I think there wasn't any moisture sealing on that coat, ( see the wet coat image) I think in 80's designers don't know about coating or sealing fabrics feature, but I'm not sure.
1366_2000.jpg
 

dbowker3d

New Member
Moisture resistant fabric was utilized (via chemicals) since the 1800s, most commonly with a process called Mercerizing, though that is applied at the thread stage. Previously boiled fat, oils or waxes were used to impregnate the textile, including leather, to make it resistant to water. The older methods were less breathable and made the fabric significantly heavier, so by the 20th century new methods came into play.

In the 1940s, new modern techniques were used, originally invented for tents, combat clothing and more in WWII. They ended up being marketed later for consumer textlies like carpet, drapes and furniture covering. This development has been more or less continuous ever since.

There are plenty of ways today to add it after the fact, and in Hollywood they have been applied for many decades to soften up and age the look of the fabrics.
 

Jamesfett

Sr Member
I think the coat gets soaked throughout the movie so I tend to agree there was no coating on it.

Either way looking awesome!
 

Jameel Ur

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Moisture resistant fabric was utilized (via chemicals) since the 1800s, most commonly with a process called Mercerizing, though that is applied at the thread stage. Previously boiled fat, oils or waxes were used to impregnate the textile, including leather, to make it resistant to water. The older methods were less breathable and made the fabric significantly heavier, so by the 20th century new methods came into play.

In the 1940s, new modern techniques were used, originally invented for tents, combat clothing and more in WWII. They ended up being marketed later for consumer textlies like carpet, drapes and furniture covering. This development has been more or less continuous ever since.

There are plenty of ways today to add it after the fact, and in Hollywood they have been applied for many decades to soften up and age the look of the fabrics.
Interesting.
 

Patattack

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I do think that the coat gets visibly soaked during the movie, so I'm inclined to agree that there isn't a coating. (Or if there is, that it's merely water resistant and not water proof.)

That said...I would be curious to see how a waxed cotton version of this coat might look...
 

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