My HAL 9000 builds (plural)

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


Mozzie

New Member
Hm. I’m not sure what you mean. Nikon 35mm film lenses aren’t described in T-stops since they aren’t motion picture lenses. They use f-stops. And the Nikkor 8mm f/2.8 lens couldn’t have been used for anything in 2001 since that model was introduced in 1970, after the film came out.

The century rehouse is listed in Tstops, though I think it's actually a T3.1 when measured
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

nkg

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Yeah, I was gonna say - if they stuck a new mount on a still film lens and used it for motion picture purposes they likely wouldn’t have a T-stop number equivalent to its f-stop, even at short focal lengths!
 

joberg

Master Member
Yeah, I was gonna say - if they stuck a new mount on a still film lens and used it for motion picture purposes they likely wouldn’t have a T-stop number equivalent to its f-stop, even at short focal lengths!
Yes, that was confusing:unsure:...still trying to make sense of the T-stop vs F-stop:p
 

nkg

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Lenses for still cameras have their maximum f-stop marked on them, which is equivalent to the largest aperture setting of the lens. This is a ratio of the focal length of the lens divided by the aperture diameter.

Lenses for film and video cameras have their maximum T-stop. This is a different value, as it is transmissive - it tells you how much actual light gets through the lens. This is because filmmakers need to know how much light will hit their film or sensor in an absolute sense.

T-stops involve absolute measures of light, whereas f-stops involve relative measures of length.

For more information, have a look at my book on camera lenses. The Lens by NK Guy. ;)

Anyway. And now back to Jay's HAL thread!
 

j_holtslander

Active Member
It took a while to arrive due to a crappy local courier being used but the frame arrived yesterday. It’s a tad thicker than the Moebius frame but this doesn’t bother me. It has 1/8th facing edge but will need some risers used along the border to keep the faceplate at the right level from the edge. I was thinking of styrene strips. I’ll also need to add the aluminum section that divides the top section from the speaker with some 1/8 bar.

i realize there’ll be people who think this isn’t accurate enough but it’s accurate enough for me and for my friend’s gift. I don’t have the means to do better.

I ordered it from here.

 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Fett_Ish

Sr Member
It took a while to arrive due to a crappy local courier being used but the frame arrived yesterday. It’s a tad thicker than the Moebius frame but this doesn’t bother me. It has 1/8th facing edge but will need some risers used along the border to keep the faceplate at the right level from the edge. I was thinking of styrene strips. I’ll also need to add the aluminum section that divides the top section from the speaker with some 1/8 bar.

i realize there’ll be people who think this isn’t accurate enough but it’s accurate enough for me and for my friend’s gift. I don’t have the means to do better.

I ordered it from here.

I find this totally acceptable and am going to get one myself. I want to hang mine so this is perfect.
 

j_holtslander

Active Member
One note... If anyone else is thinking of ordering the same frame I did... I specified that my provided dimensions were for the OUTSIDE edge of the frame and NOT for artwork that was to be housed within the frame. (How they usually do things) Otherwise they’d have made the frame to accommodate my dimensions and ensure a gap on each side of the “painting’s canvas”
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Fett_Ish

Sr Member
One note... If anyone else is thinking of ordering the same frame I did... I specified that my provided dimensions were for the OUTSIDE edge of the frame and NOT for artwork that was to be housed within the frame. (How they usually do things) Otherwise they’d have made the frame to accommodate my dimensions and ensure a gap on each side of the “painting’s canvas”
I’m not sure I understand how you came to your dimension. Did you measure the outside of a kit and use those? Also if depth is an issue, I had planned on mounting mine on some black plexiglass so you could inset it into something making it appear shallower.
 

j_holtslander

Active Member
Need some advice. I need to take off like 1/32-1/16” from the top and bottom edges of the frame with my limited tool set. Anyone have any ideas? Need to keep those 45s clean.
 

nkg

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
It's really tough cutting metal, even softer alloys like aluminium. I find it difficult not to make a total mess of it. You can cut things like that with razor saws in mitre blocks, and then carefully file down any unevenness, but it's not easy for amateurs like me!
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

asavage

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Need some advice. I need to take off like 1/32-1/16” from the top and bottom edges of the frame with my limited tool set. Anyone have any ideas? Need to keep those 45s clean.
To be clear: you mean to take about .060" off the two long pieces of your frame. Is that correct? This is tough, but doable. I wouldn't use a powertool at all on this. A hand file is truly the best solution. It's what I'd use, even though I have a mill. Check out Chris' file technique on Clickspring:
If you use a marker to darken where the cut is going to happen, and a scribe (or a sewing needle tbh) to carefully, precisely mark out what material you're taking away, AND you mount your piece securely ( make sure your vise jaws or your piece are taped up well with masking tape to keep from marring the surface finish) AND you go slow, with an average file you should be able to remove that material to your satisfaction. Go slow, check constantly, move your piece so you can always see what the results of each file stroke will be. I find Chris' channel super inspirational for exactly this type of mindset, and I now do some things faster with files that I used to do them on the mill.

Good luck!
 

j_holtslander

Active Member
This is tough, but doable.
That feeling when your idol unexpectedly appears and offers you advice:
marshall-how-i-met-your-mother-cute-aw-gif.gif

Hey Adam, you saw Peter Jacksons' HAL prototype. Was the face plate brushed metal? Do you recall? (Some people think it doesn't appear to be.)

Progress​

Added styrene to the frame as a support for the face plate and speaker grill. Took a razor saw to the back of the Moebius speaker grill so it can sit flat. (I plan to glue black fabric to the backside of the grill.)
Ordering second aluminum frame (Now that I'm happy with the first) along with some extra lengths (sans 45 cuts) for the divider between the speaker and the main faceplate.
Ordering some small silver metal plates (from the same place as I got my faceplates from) to act as a backing for my HAL 9000 logo decal.

 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top