My Adventures in 3D Printing

Rusty85

Sr Member
If that’s the case, it sounds like there’s a problem with the model itself. Do you happen to have access to another printer that you could try it on?

Sean
I actually had one printed from I.materialise and it looks perfect. The file came in a solid and hollow version originally. My friend took the solid one and said he uses a feature on the program to hollow it out. Not sure if that would cause an issue. I told him to use the one already premodeled hollow but he said he didn’t see it initially lol.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
My buddy was printing me a couple things on his resin printer and for some reason with this model these lines seem to be appearing. He’s tried changing the orientation but it hasn’t helped at all. Anyone have any ideas what might be going wrong?

Those transitions happen at the times where the peel forces are a bit different because of the amount of surface area that has to be printed at the time. Try hollowing out your model to reduce the amount of surface area of the layer or you can try re-orienting the object to prevent any drastic layer area changes, but that is not always possible.

TazMan2000
 

Rusty85

Sr Member
Those transitions happen at the times where the peel forces are a bit different because of the amount of surface area that has to be printed at the time. Try hollowing out your model to reduce the amount of surface area of the layer or you can try re-orienting the object to prevent any drastic layer area changes, but that is not always possible.

TazMan2000
Thanks for the input! He ended up changing the orientation and that helped quite a bit. There was still a tiny bit of lines, but nothing too bad at all.
 

masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Firing up the Phrozen Sonic Mega 8K…

Sean
4CE37111-1327-4A23-A794-1AB3DC937E45.jpeg
 

Bengrim09

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Filling, rubbing, filling and rubbing for a while, ordered an electronics kit for it, slow process with the rubbing as I’ve got bad hands ( tendinitis) in both.
Been off work a while now just passing the time
DA5A8AAB-20AB-4A84-BC71-24EA8D7D58A8.jpeg
B3EE0CBF-ED8F-45BA-93A8-6D4EE18A4870.jpeg
EEF93A38-418C-47C5-9064-609D7E64F9A5.jpeg
I’ve already started with the filling, rubbing and primer, just keep going over it as I hate to see too many layer lines
 

masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The initial test print for the Sonic Mega 8K failed…found it stuck to the FEP.

I had a similar problem when I initially got my Photon Mono X, so I went through a similar process of verifying the printer was level, cleaning the build plate with some IPA, and applying some lubricant to the FEP. I would normally re-level the build plate, but this printer comes with it already leveled, so I didn’t want to mess with it unless there was a big problem.

And success! Although I think they should include a more appropriate test file for such a massive printer… :lol:

818EB72E-0BF0-4B9F-A296-7FF2B39C5708.jpeg

4F74659F-5A8B-4791-B09E-9ED8BBACFD3C.jpeg
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
The initial test print for the Sonic Mega 8K failed…found it stuck to the FEP.

I had a similar problem when I initially got my Photon Mono X, so I went through a similar process of verifying the printer was level, cleaning the build plate with some IPA, and applying some lubricant to the FEP. I would normally re-level the build plate, but this printer comes with it already leveled, so I didn’t want to mess with it unless there was a big problem.

And success! Although I think they should include a more appropriate test file for such a massive printer… :lol:

View attachment 1535115
View attachment 1535116
It looks a little rough for 8K. Was it put in alcohol & scrubbed?

TazMan2000
 

masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
It looks a little rough for 8K. Was it put in alcohol & scrubbed?

TazMan2000
I cleaned it in an old tub of used IPA, which is what caused the white goobers you’re seeing.

I went ahead and printed the Dune bull sculpture that I had been struggling to get off my Mono X. Not bad…

Sean
9F547F0B-3950-4CDA-A38D-A586CA6AA619.jpeg
 

masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
After taking the bull off the printer to get it cleaned and cured, I noticed a portion of the exterior surface was still very tacky and almost soft to the touch. You can see it on the left front leg and heading under the horns.
CD500CD3-B53E-413F-8D36-84E7B74BE095.jpeg


I printed a second one with the exact same settings and resin, and I got a similar issue although it seems to be a band across the entire piece.
8C173235-9324-4D21-9854-AF8E6AA53225.jpeg

Based on how it started and stopped, I would have said this was due to insufficiently mixed resin, but I posted on the Phrozen FB page, and folks seem to think it has to do with improper drain holes.

Due to the size of the model, I hollowed it and added a few drain holes. The suggestion I’m getting is you need a hole for each cavity, which I’m sure I didn’t do.

Any thoughts?

Sean
 

xeno

Sr Member
After taking the bull off the printer to get it cleaned and cured, I noticed a portion of the exterior surface was still very tacky and almost soft to the touch. You can see it on the left front leg and heading under the horns.
View attachment 1536856

I printed a second one with the exact same settings and resin, and I got a similar issue although it seems to be a band across the entire piece.
View attachment 1536857
Based on how it started and stopped, I would have said this was due to insufficiently mixed resin, but I posted on the Phrozen FB page, and folks seem to think it has to do with improper drain holes.

Due to the size of the model, I hollowed it and added a few drain holes. The suggestion I’m getting is you need a hole for each cavity, which I’m sure I didn’t do.

Any thoughts?

Sean

Just to be sure, you know the holes for the hollow parts, need to be closest to the build blate !
So for this model probaly the ends of the feet and bottom/lowest of the belly.
 

masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Just to be sure, you know the holes for the hollow parts, need to be closest to the build blate !
So for this model probaly the ends of the feet and bottom/lowest of the belly.
Can you explain this to me?

I figured the drain holes needed to be on the vat side of the print so it could actually drain when upside down, but everyone seems to be putting them on the build plate side…
Refer to my suggestion in post #302.

TazMan2000
Thanks. I did hollow this one. Reorienting to minimize the printing area would have been next.

Sean
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Can you explain this to me?

I figured the drain holes needed to be on the vat side of the print so it could actually drain when upside down, but everyone seems to be putting them on the build plate side…

Thanks. I did hollow this one. Reorienting to minimize the printing area would have been next.

Sean

The drain holes should be at the lowest portion of the print and be a little larger as well.

TazMan2000
 

xeno

Sr Member
Can you explain this to me?

I figured the drain holes needed to be on the vat side of the print so it could actually drain when upside down, but everyone seems to be putting them on the build plate side…

Thanks. I did hollow this one. Reorienting to minimize the printing area would have been next.

Sean
When you start printing hollow parts, the hole is supposed to prevent suction inside the hollow parts, and you also have to think upside down with resin printing.
maybe this vid will help:


 
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masterjedi322

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks! Those are helpful!

My take-away is holes can serve two purposes and need to be placed in different parts of the print:

  1. Venting holes - prevent hollowed prints from creating suction against the FEP. To be placed as close to the build plate as possible.
  2. Drain holes - allow for uncured resin to drain out from a hollowed print. Can be placed on the FEP-side of the print to allow draining while the print hangs from the build plate. Alternatively, you can use your vent holes as drain holes, but the print needs to be flipped right-side up and removed from the build plate to do so.
Does that summarize it well?

Sean
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Thanks! Those are helpful!

My take-away is holes can serve two purposes and need to be placed in different parts of the print:

  1. Venting holes - prevent hollowed prints from creating suction against the FEP. To be placed as close to the build plate as possible.
  2. Drain holes - allow for uncured resin to drain out from a hollowed print. Can be placed on the FEP-side of the print to allow draining while the print hangs from the build plate. Alternatively, you can use your vent holes as drain holes, but the print needs to be flipped right-side up and removed from the build plate to do so.
Does that summarize it well?

Sean

Exactly.

Also, thicker fluids require a larger vent and drain hole as their viscosity can prevent them from draining and venting.

TazMan2000
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
And warmer temps can help with low viscosity resins.

Exactly. There is a certain temperature range recommended by the manufacturer of the resin where it works best. Too thick or too thin and you may have problems. Keep in mind that a resin that is too cold, will put a bit more pressure on the LCD since the resin doesn't want to move away fast enough when the bed comes down. It is also likely that the print may have bubbles in it for the same reason.

TazMan2000
 

Iskelderon

Sr Member
Exactly. There is a certain temperature range recommended by the manufacturer of the resin where it works best. Too thick or too thin and you may have problems. Keep in mind that a resin that is too cold, will put a bit more pressure on the LCD since the resin doesn't want to move away fast enough when the bed comes down. It is also likely that the print may have bubbles in it for the same reason.

TazMan2000
Luckily, that target temperature range usually equals normal room temperature.
Basically, if you are comfortable in that room, so is your resin printer.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Luckily, that target temperature range usually equals normal room temperature.
Basically, if you are comfortable in that room, so is your resin printer.

True. Most resins do well in the 20-25 degree Celcius range. But, for those who have issues when printing that aren't related to bed level, try printing in a warmer room.

TazMan2000
 

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