My Adventures in 3D Printing

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kalkamel

Sr Member
With the Mandalorian helmet, you'd need supports for the top of the visor section but none for the top of the dome. You can use the block supports feature in Cura for that.

 

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masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The back does indeed look great!

The seam will more or less always be present-- unfortunate side effect of the printing process. If you look for "zseam alignment" or something along those lines in cura, you can set where it happens. I usually set mine to "Sharpest corner"-- that way it aligns with an edge and is hidden better.

Chep or teaching tech always has great tutorials on supports. I usually just turn them on in cura and leave them at default. Only thing Ill do is add support blockers from the left hand menu if I dont want supports in certain areas-- like at the top of the dome like I mentioned before.

Sometimes you can get away with no supports on horizontal pieces and rely on your machine's bridging capabilities, but if the line has any curve it will get messy like the visor did; straight lines only, up to around 10mm depending on your machine and it's abilities. There are bridging tests on thingiverse you can print to test out how far you can push your machine.

Layer separation is probably from printing the ABS without an enclosure. Drafts of air hit it and cool the plastic before it can bond properly. If this was happening all over I would guess that your temp needs to be upped, but since the back is perfect I would guess drafts. If this was in another material like PLA I would guess you wouldnt see those splits at all.

One thing that looks really good-- your layer alignment on the back is pretty much perfect. I have had some of the toughest time getting my z motor and leadscrew to play nicely and have had some prints with some wobble in them as the printer moves layer to layer

With the Mandalorian helmet, you'd need supports for the top of the visor section but none for the top of the dome. You can use the block supports feature in Cura for that.

Much appreciated, both of you! So much to learn, but folks are so sharing and helpful!

Sean
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
I usually subdivide my objects in meshmixer to reduce the amount of supports and thusly the amount of material and time needed to print. Most times this makes the model stronger, because the separated sections have walls around them and not fill.

TazMan2000
 

masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks for the tips!

Printed this t-Rex skull for the kids out of bone-colored PLA. Not bad! Almost want to go print a bigger one!

Sean

75C44D6B-BE3C-40FF-8DBE-2C99233E4163.jpeg
 

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masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks, all! It’s not a perfect print, but works great for the kids!

Next up was trying some rainbow silk filament. Printed a few of these ghosts for Halloween.

Sean

67F6EE79-1BCE-457D-B6E6-2B127FC708E5.jpeg
 

masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
My next project was helping a friend print some Loki horns for an Alligator Loki costume. I tried a few times on my FDM printer but just could not get the horns to print correctly…
74E483CE-9C83-4069-9D7D-D440BBDFDD3E.jpeg
D566C59B-1C14-49D8-A2D9-02813698CFEC.jpeg


I ended up throwing it on the resin printer. After a failed print, due to improper supports, finally got it done!

86519C99-61AC-482F-8AE8-54346075F5EB.jpeg


Sean
 

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TazMan2000

Master Member
I’m on with a mando bucket from great ape
Had the file for ages just never got round to printing it
Cut the top off to save on wasted filament for supports View attachment 1510767 View attachment 1510768

Yes, that's the way to do it. Far less costly.
What I usually do is, drill tiny hole and stick pins in, then drill corresponding holes in the other part/s. I test fit several times, bend the pins, until I get a perfect fit. Then I glue. Very little, if any filler needed.

TazMan2000
 

Bengrim09

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Yes, that's the way to do it. Far less costly.
What I usually do is, drill tiny hole and stick pins in, then drill corresponding holes in the other part/s. I test fit several times, bend the pins, until I get a perfect fit. Then I glue. Very little, if any filler needed.

TazMan2000
Never tried that way, I might give it a try
 

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