Mandalorian Reference Thread

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ron11dot3

New Member
Finally completed the "punching bag". Double capped rivets on everything except for the rank badge which came with Chicago screws.

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Detail of the rivet. This was a bit tough to attach as it was going through 3 layers of canvas, but managed to squeeze it together.

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This is one version of the on screen bag. The other has the rivets at the edge of grommets. Still debating if I should weather the rank badge or just let it happen over time.
 

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E Williams

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
This is one version of the on screen bag. The other has the rivets at the edge of grommets.

Do you have a screen cap or two illustrating the two versions of the bag? I’ve been following this thread and tried to spot this in the episode but am feeling a bit clueless.
 

ron11dot3

New Member
Do you have a screen cap or two illustrating the two versions of the bag? I’ve been following this thread and tried to spot this in the episode but am feeling a bit clueless.

I have attached a comparison of the two types of bag variations. This is around the 4:30 mark of Episode 8 where the two scouts are waiting at the check point. As with most props, they must have had different versions of the bag on set and didn't catch the continuity issue with the bags as minor as it is.

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I went with the version that worked for the rivets I had. I went with the version that had the rivets placed 2nd to the last row. This only needed the rivet to go through the grommet and one layer of the belt. The other version may have had longer rivets to pass through 2 sets of grommets or had the grommets removed. Both versions are screen accurate.
 

Ares X

Well-Known Member
I finished the weathering on the Mandalorian blaster that I built. I'm pretty happy with it. I met up with a bunch of my fellow Mandalorian Mercs last night and they all thought it was a 3D print and were surprised to find out it was all built by hand. For now I am calling it complete because I need to get back to build the rest of the armor. Hoping to have it done before Phoenix Fan Fusion (Phoenix's version of Comic Con) and definitely need it done before SW Celebration 2020.

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AstroZopyros

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Any of the painters on here have any idea what kind of paints you need to use to make that metallic finish!?

The armor looks like steel for crying out loud

What a paint job
I'm not sure if someone has given there opinion, but graphite powder buffed onto gloss black paint looks amazing!
 

AstroZopyros

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I've heard this before. I'm not familiar with the process at all. Do you then seal it with something like a gloss clear coat?
I'm actually using the process now to work on a bergmann mando blaster. Basically the shinier the undercoat, (the black) the more chrome-like it looks. So for the blaster I used more of a satin. You buff in the graphite powder when the paint has set up for around 2-3 hours. Graphite powder is actually a form of dry lubricant and can be purchased from an automotive store! Yes you then seal it with either a glossy coat or satin depending on the look you're going for!
 

Ares X

Well-Known Member
I'm actually using the process now to work on a bergmann mando blaster. Basically the shinier the undercoat, (the black) the more chrome-like it looks. So for the blaster I used more of a satin. You buff in the graphite powder when the paint has set up for around 2-3 hours. Graphite powder is actually a form of dry lubricant and can be purchased from an automotive store! Yes you then seal it with either a glossy coat or satin depending on the look you're going for!

Nice! Thanks for the info. I will be trying this for sure.
 

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Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
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I posted over in the ANOVOS Mandalorian helmet discussion, but it's easier right now to just re-state. Typical human visual acuity is about 40 microns/micrometers. Something with a particle size around there or smaller is better. 325-mesh metal powder is pretty commonly available -- that's about 47µ. Larger particles make for more "sparkle". The other factors are particle shape and carrier. A lot of places don't specify, so you may have to do your homework. In general, though, if two sources of the same size have a significant price difference, guess which is probably preferable. The flatter ("cornflake") particles tend to be better than the rounder ("silver dollar" and "sphere"). Flat makes for a more uniform surface. Round creates multidirectionality that causes glittery light-kicks.

The chemicals used to process those general types also result in different behavior in the carrier, with the cornflake particles aligning in a flat layer at the top, for a uniform metal-looking finish, while the rounder particles tend to be more distributed through the carrier.

I have 325-mesh stainless steel powder I use for surface-coating small things. It looks metal-like enough for a 1:1 small prop of a couple inches. For anything bigger, I base-coat in RustOleum's Professional Grade black (the PG paints have ground up ABS dissolved in suspension as the pigment, so when it's cured, you've basically coated whatever you painted in a smooth, shiny layer of ABS plastic). They I lay down a coat of Testor's Metalizer sealer first, and then hit it with the stainless steel Metalizer and leave it to cure. It buffs to a finish I can't tell from actual stainless steel.

Basically, there are lots of options, but it can take time, effort, and money to find the exact recipe that works best for you and your skills and what you're making with them.
 

AstroZopyros

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I posted over in the ANOVOS Mandalorian helmet discussion, but it's easier right now to just re-state. Typical human visual acuity is about 40 microns/micrometers. Something with a particle size around there or smaller is better. 325-mesh metal powder is pretty commonly available -- that's about 47µ. Larger particles make for more "sparkle". The other factors are particle shape and carrier. A lot of places don't specify, so you may have to do your homework. In general, though, if two sources of the same size have a significant price difference, guess which is probably preferable. The flatter ("cornflake") particles tend to be better than the rounder ("silver dollar" and "sphere"). Flat makes for a more uniform surface. Round creates multidirectionality that causes glittery light-kicks.

The chemicals used to process those general types also result in different behavior in the carrier, with the cornflake particles aligning in a flat layer at the top, for a uniform metal-looking finish, while the rounder particles tend to be more distributed through the carrier.

I have 325-mesh stainless steel powder I use for surface-coating small things. It looks metal-like enough for a 1:1 small prop of a couple inches. For anything bigger, I base-coat in RustOleum's Professional Grade black (the PG paints have ground up ABS dissolved in suspension as the pigment, so when it's cured, you've basically coated whatever you painted in a smooth, shiny layer of ABS plastic). They I lay down a coat of Testor's Metalizer sealer first, and then hit it with the stainless steel Metalizer and leave it to cure. It buffs to a finish I can't tell from actual stainless steel.

Basically, there are lots of options, but it can take time, effort, and money to find the exact recipe that works best for you and your skills and what you're making with them.
Beautiful! Thanks so much for that info!
 

Mr Mold Maker

Master Member
Working on a (mostly) full set of Mando armor. Not ready to share all of the pieces yet, but I did spend a good bit of time working on the thigh and I’m happy enough to share it.

Damage was a combination of this image, the D23 Armor, and the actual physical damage sculpted into this piece. Not 100% accurate by any means, but I think it’s close enough.

Now I’ve just got to do this with all of the other parts!
1C0DF38F-F3BB-40F0-A817-989C68D14C48.jpeg
 
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AstroZopyros

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Working on a (mostly) full set of Mando armor. Not ready to share all of the pieces yet, but I did spend a good bit of time working on the thigh and I’m happy enough to share it.

Damage was a combination of this image, the D23 Armor, and the actual physical damage sculpted into this piece. Not 100% accurate by any means, but I think it’s close enough.

Now I’ve just got to do this with all of the other parts! View attachment 1259339
Awesome work!!
 

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Malibu139

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Working on a (mostly) full set of Mando armor. Not ready to share all of the pieces yet, but I did spend a good bit of time working on the thigh and I’m happy enough to share it.

Damage was a combination of this image, the D23 Armor, and the actual physical damage sculpted into this piece. Not 100% accurate by any means, but I think it’s close enough.

Now I’ve just got to do this with all of the other parts! View attachment 1259339


WOW just WOW.
I cant wait to see the rest!
Mind sharing what its made out of? Did you sculpt yourself ?

This is outstanding
 

Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks so much for that info!
It took me too many years and too many dollars to start digging into why none of the metallic spray paints (including the ones that claimed to look "Just like real metal!") I tried just always looked like, well, metallic paint. First started running into useful information in my early days of mucking about with Alclad II and Testors Metalizer. Thank the gods for the internet. The hobby community rapidly learned (and before I did) that using a sealer over the metalizer (as Testors lays out in their instructions) dulls the finish and makes it look like paint. But unsealed metalizers like Alclad II tend to take fingerprints and rub off if handled too much.

The good stuff is all, basically, micro-leafing the surface. The flakes align flat and overlapping with each other in a thin-thin layer at the top of the carrier, so it's just the same, on a very small scale, as applying gold leaf over an adhesive substrate. The trick -- with leafing, with Rub'n'Buff, with metalizer paints -- is to give it a good base to stick to. Whether it's adhesive or sealer or lacquer clearcoat or whatever. Give the metalizer something to really stick to and, after it's buffed, it should be pretty resistant to rubbing off.
 

AstroZopyros

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
It took me too many years and too many dollars to start digging into why none of the metallic spray paints (including the ones that claimed to look "Just like real metal!") I tried just always looked like, well, metallic paint. First started running into useful information in my early days of mucking about with Alclad II and Testors Metalizer. Thank the gods for the internet. The hobby community rapidly learned (and before I did) that using a sealer over the metalizer (as Testors lays out in their instructions) dulls the finish and makes it look like paint. But unsealed metalizers like Alclad II tend to take fingerprints and rub off if handled too much.

The good stuff is all, basically, micro-leafing the surface. The flakes align flat and overlapping with each other in a thin-thin layer at the top of the carrier, so it's just the same, on a very small scale, as applying gold leaf over an adhesive substrate. The trick -- with leafing, with Rub'n'Buff, with metalizer paints -- is to give it a good base to stick to. Whether it's adhesive or sealer or lacquer clearcoat or whatever. Give the metalizer something to really stick to and, after it's buffed, it should be pretty resistant to rubbing off.
Definitely, that makes sense! It's basically metal plating on a micro scale!
 

Mr Mold Maker

Master Member
WOW just WOW.
I cant wait to see the rest!
Mind sharing what its made out of? Did you sculpt yourself ?

This is outstanding

Thanks as always for your support my friend. This set of armor comes from the Plastic Arms Dealer. It is a mix of fiberglass and 3D printed pieces.

They arrived super rough and I’ve had to do a lot of bodyshopping. I’m under a deadline but if I wasn’t I would have really liked to have taken a full week or two just getting the pieces cleaned up.
 

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