First sculpt and am in desperate need of advice.

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MMCD

New Member
Hi there I'm looking for some advice on adding wrinkles to my gorilla head sculpt.
My big problem is I carve in my wrinkle lines and then use a brush and water to smooth them out after blending them as best I can with my wooden tools.
This is where the problem starts I seem to be washing most of the detail away even though I'm using a small soft brush with not a lot of water.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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SMOKE

Well-Known Member
I would try less water than what your using now. Not sure how much "not a lot" is, but less water seems like the right step forward. Try dampening your brush to the point where you like "is this thing even wet?" and then try to smooth them out. If that does nothing then make it a tiny bit damper.

Rinse and repeat until it all smooths out..(pun intended)

What kind of clay are you using btw?
 

AMPETITE

New Member
Try rolling clay "worms" to create hills and valleys for 3D effect . So in between two wrinkle lines add a worm of clay then smooth. Many people have great success with this technique. Jordu Schell states that he picked this up from Rick Baker. It can be quite a look. Try layering them and all sorts of combinations. Good luck
 

Leigh

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Your using an oil based clay right?? I'm no expert but I'm using a technique on Bob that works for me.
I use cling film! I apply it to the surface pressing very lightly & I use a brush to push it into shapes on the surface. I then carve my line, dot my dot etc & peel the film off.
I found it frustrating that if you carve a line etc without film, the displaced clay forms a raised area on either side of your cut. With the film in place as you push into the clay you push the film in aswell & the displaced clay doesnt form those raised areas.
I have found as time has gone by that I dont use the cling film as much as I used to & I've started to just blend stuff in with the tools or use the tools in a way that has the desired effect :)
I've only been at this for a year & have alot to learn myself yet.
I also found some usefull vids on youtube :)
HTH :)
 

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Durrett

Active Member
The quality of my sculpting went up a lot after I started using one of these to sculpt. It's like a brush made of rubber. great for wrinkles and folds.
 

MMCD

New Member
I Hope this works, first time responding with Multi quotes...
If it messes up my apologies...

pics or it didn't happen.
Some pic's will be coming soon for you Jessica

I would try less water than what your using now. Not sure how much "not a lot" is, but less water seems like the right step forward.

What kind of clay are you using btw?
Thanks for the advice SMOKE i'll try less water... Not a lot seemed to explain small amounts well at the time :)
WED clay

Try rolling clay "worms" to create hills and valleys for 3D effect .
Jordu Schell states that he picked this up from Rick Baker.
Thanks AMPETITE if this works for Rick Baker and Jordu i'm trying it!

I use cling film! I apply it to the surface pressing very lightly & I use a brush to push it into shapes on the surface. I then carve my line, dot my dot etc & peel the film off.
I found it frustrating that if you carve a line etc without film, the displaced clay forms a raised area on either side of your cut.
HTH :)
Awesome, thanks Leigh. I'm trying this to see what effects i can get!...

The quality of my sculpting went up a lot after I started using one of these to sculpt. It's like a brush made of rubber. great for wrinkles and folds.
Fantastic! going to order one of them and check out the results thanks Durrett.

Thanks all of you for all your advice.
Loads of great techniques and tools to try.

If anyone else wants to throw ideas into the mix of what works for them when sculpting wrinkles or other fleshy details, please fire away I'm sure loads of noob's like myself will find this useful.
 

Leigh

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I dont know if the cling film method will work with WED clay :confused it might just make a mess of your surface????
If your on a really tight budget (like me :$) you can make your own rubber tipped tools with some old paint brushes & a pencil eraser :)
 

NexusFX

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
wed is suuuper soft, and is the majority of why the water is messing you up. wed is really for speed sculpts and throwaway. If you want to really get down and dirty pick up some monster makers clay. Im sure 90% of the guys on here can vouch for its awesomeness.
 

SMOKE

Well-Known Member
From what I hear monster makers is awesome stuff. I use nsp chavant medium and couldn't be happier. It's a close cheaper alternative to monster makers.
 

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Jessica

Well-Known Member
I've never worked with the medium you are using. For one of my ape masks I used what they had at the art store at the time, which was Klean Klay but it was super soft. Really hard to work with I found out but it was what I had so I had to make it work. I also didn't realize that it came in different hardnesses. Now I just use this clay to make walls for my 1:6 molding.
 

MMCD

New Member
Thanks once again for all the info' I do have some Monster makers clay it came included when I bought one of their mask making kits, but I found it a little tough to use as this is my first time sculpting anything.

I am going to try out all the various suggestions: the rubber tool, The carved pencil eraser, the Cling Film with the WED and will let you know my results.

In the meantime here are some cell phone pics of what i have done so far looking forward to starting in on weekend 2.... Come on Friday!

First time posting images so bear with me if this doesn't work!
 

Jessica

Well-Known Member
Oh now I see what you mean! I think one of the tricks I learned to get rid of those little bits of excess clay is to dust baby powder on a soft paint brush and work it off of your sculpt. I'm not sure if this would work with what clay you are using, but when I used Klean Klay it worked for me.
 

MMCD

New Member
Thats impressive!! to say the least (y)thumbsup:thumbsup
WOW, thanks Leigh that's high praise indeed I've been following your Bob project and after seeing that I know I still have a ways to to.

Oh now I see what you mean! I think one of the tricks I learned to get rid of those little bits of excess clay is to dust baby powder on a soft paint brush and work it off of your sculpt. I'm not sure if this would work with what clay you are using, but when I used Klean Klay it worked for me.
Hi Jessica thanks for the tip... How did you find out that the powder helps to remove the little clay lumps.

I do have a couple of questions for you...

Does the powder dry out the sculpt?
Should I do this as a last step before casting?
 

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Jessica

Well-Known Member
I am not sure if it dries out the clay you are using. I found out from reading through another forum...fxlab forum..or is it effectslab?...I didn't overpowder either...but it did help to brush off that lose clay. I think it would work out ok for you and I would do it throughout just to keep my work neat. It was very helpful with the super soft Klean Klay I was using though. But again, I am not an expert and it was a useful tip that helped me.

Here's a link to the other forum: http://www.theeffectslab.com/forums/index.php
 
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88OrBust

Member
I would recommend keeping a bag pulled over your sculpture when your not working on it. Some people put a damp cloth over there sculptures, but this just forms mold. Also when working with wed don't use the water so much that your sculpture becomes a mud pie. Let the clay dry out just a little bit before detailing because this is when the best detail can be obtained. Also for dulling detail try using a stipple sponge or scotch brite pad with a plastic bag under it. Also when doing wrinkles this technique works well. It is better illustrated in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr70NCQlh20
 
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Jessica

Well-Known Member
Oh...forgot to mention that I ended up using a very soft brush to brush off the clay dregs because at the time, I did not have canned air. A deft touch worked wonders.
 

NexusFX

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
take some canned air flip it upside down and freeze the little excess clay. then just brush it off. stan winston trick ;)
 

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