another papercraft question: using card stock for the model

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by keithktam, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. keithktam

    keithktam New Member

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    hi, have to use two separate posts. since i am doing this the first time, there would be some silly questions, sorry about that...
    ok, as i have said, i am building a warhammer tank model with card stock, may i ask how many of you would just glue the template (printed separately) on to the card stock directly, or would you do it differently?? cause i am so trying to find an alternative to this, i fear the paper might pill off even after primer and paint... also, i am also thinking of using plastic board/plating for my next project and would love to make it paper free.

    thanks!!
     
  2. rbeach84

    rbeach84 Sr Member

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    I'd recommend 'running some tests' to validate your media's handling and performance properties before committing to the actual project. There are a lot of variables so best to exercise with your "tools" with no risk first.

    R/ Robert
     
  3. RogueTrooper

    RogueTrooper Well-Known Member

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    You don't need the paper template at all. Just print direct to the card stock. I use 200gsm for helmets and armor and that goes through a laser printer fine. If you using lighter stock then even better.
     
  4. keithktam

    keithktam New Member

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    thanks for your advice!!

    i think i am probably using thicker than that, tried using the printer on it, but it just wouldn't take it.....:rolleyes
     
  5. RogueTrooper

    RogueTrooper Well-Known Member

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    Then use thinner card;)....200gsm is plenty for large objects, so anything small like a tank model would use a lighter card stock.
     
  6. rbeach84

    rbeach84 Sr Member

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    Couple of things; first, laser printers 'set' the toner particles using heat. Too thin a plastic sheet might melt in the process. Perhaps there is a setting for printing on transparency films that would be appropriate? Second, printing to plastic sheet directly isn't going to work at all with an inkjet printer. Also, printing direct from someone else's paper model design will waste a lot of plastic since the parts will be arranged however the designer wanted without perhaps any particular concern on conserving material. I still recommend using a transfer method will be most efficient in most situations if for no other reason than you can be more selective in the plastic thicknesses being used (paper designs tend to focus on one thickness of material while plastic card modeling may dictate being more specific to the part being fabricated.)

    R/ Robert
     
  7. keithktam

    keithktam New Member

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    thanks!!
    keith
     

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