And the BEST Western of all time is...

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The Brahma Bull

Well-Known Member
Everything with Terence Hill and Bud Spencer. And the Dollar Trilogy. I Like the 3:10 to Yuma with Bale and Crowe. Even enjoyed the Remake of The Magnificient Seven from 2016. Don't Like anything with John Wayne. Maybe you've to be "murican" to get into those
 

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CT1138

Sr Member
Nope. I'm 'Murican, and I don't "get" the whole John Wayne thing either. I don't dislike the man, but I don't see what all the fuss is about. Nothing special.
Agreed. The man almost seemed like a bridge between the personality actors of the Golden Era like Humphrey Bogart (who pretty much played the same boozy cynic in every movie) and the personality actors of the '80s like Stallone, who always played the same oiled up muscle-man. In his case, Wayne pretty much always played the same aloof gunslinger in almost every one of his movies. I like a few of his movies that have a supporting cast interesting enough to pull the camera away from Wayne's shoot 'em up antics (like "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" and "The Longest Day"), but I wouldn't call myself a big fan of his work, when most of his work consists of "you've seen one, you've seen them all."
 
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el toro

Sr Member
Ride in the Whirlwind directed by Monte Hellman and written by and starring Jack Nicholson. It was shot back to back with Hellman’s other western, The Shooting, which also starred Nicholson and had the great Warren Oates. They’re atypical, existential westerns, which share traits with Hellman’s thoughtful and moody film, Two Lane Blacktop.
 

joberg

Master Member
Any western with: John Wayne, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Kirk Douglas, Burt Lancaster, Robert Mitchum, Clint Eastwood, Anthony Perkins and many more ;)
 

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goldcylon

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Tombstone

How Val Kilmer didn't win an Oscar for his performance as Doc Holiday I will never know....
 

dbuck

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Agreed. The man almost seemed like a bridge between the personality actors of the Golden Era like Humphrey Bogart (who pretty much played the same boozy cynic in every movie) and the personality actors of the '80s like Stallone, who always played the same oiled up muscle-man. In his case, Wayne pretty much always played the same aloof gunslinger in almost every one of his movies. I like a few of his movies that have a supporting cast interesting enough to pull the camera away from Wayne's shoot 'em up antics (like "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" and "The Longest Day"), but I wouldn't call myself a big fan of his work, when most of his work consists of "you've seen one, you've seen them all."
Yeah, John Wayne played John Wayne his whole career. I admit to having seen more than my share of his movies, a lot of his stuff is mediocre, and some of it is bad. However, he’s got some great movies. Rio Bravo is fantastic. The Ford cavalry trilogy is really good stuff, even if dated, as is the Searchers, great flick but a tad iffy nowadays. I love The Sands of Iwo Jima. He made fast food feel good movies, many times straight up propaganda, but until the seventies that’s what people wanted.
 

goldcylon

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Yeah, John Wayne played John Wayne his whole career. I admit to having seen more than my share of his movies, a lot of his stuff is mediocre, and some of it is bad. However, he’s got some great movies. Rio Bravo is fantastic. The Ford cavalry trilogy is really good stuff, even if dated, as is the Searchers, great flick but a tad iffy nowadays. I love The Sands of Iwo Jima. He made fast food feel good movies, many times straight up propaganda, but until the seventies that’s what people wanted.
And he will forever the man who shot Liberty Valance
 

Treadwell

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I'm trying to remember who it was who said this on the Gilbert Gottfried podcast, but he was talking about John Wayne the actor still being a studio-created fictional character that he played all the time, and that he actually said to him "you don't really think you're John Wayne, do you?" It didn't go over well. ;)
 

Zombie_61

Master Member
^ John Wayne didn't just think he was John Wayne, he knew he was John Wayne. Robert Mitchum told a story about meeting John Wayne at one of his offices one day. He said when Wayne arrived he started yelling at some of his female employees about their job performance and even knocked over a chair or two on his way to his personal office. Mitchum said as soon as Wayne closed the door behind him his demeanor changed from angry to jovial and he pulled a bottle of booze out of his desk. Seeing the puzzled expression on Mitchum's face, Wayne explained with a grin, "You gotta' keep 'em Wayne-conscious." He was the boss, and he made damn sure everyone knew it.
 

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PrinceZip

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I know John Wayne is famous for Liberty Valence and other major films,
But did anyone watch 'Hondo' (1953)?

It's another great western with an amazing dog actor by JW's side.
 
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