Weathering a prop piece question

princemercury1

New Member
I'm trying to bring out the design on the chest emblem, but I don't know what I can do to make it possible.
Can someone help me? Will rub n' buff work? If so, what color rub n' buff?
 

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Use a wash. The paint and the colour of the wash would be dependent on what look you're going for and what metal it's supposed to be.

TazMan2000
 
Use a wash. The paint and the colour of the wash would be dependent on what look you're going for and what metal it's supposed to be.

TazMan2000

Thank you for replying to my question.
When you say wash, what do you mean by that? Do you mean water down some acrylic paints and dry brush it?
 
Thank you for replying to my question.
When you say wash, what do you mean by that? Do you mean water down some acrylic paints and dry brush it?

Yes and no. Thin down the paint, brush liberally over the model and allow the wash to get into the nooks and crannies, then sop up the excess. There are numerous videos on YT that will give you an idea of how to do it. Ensure you use the correct technique. Applying wash to a tank model to give it weathering might not get the right look. You want something that looks like a shiny plaque that has a cast metal effect or oxidation.

Dry brushing is using a small amount of paint, with the brush dry and lightly going over the edges.

TazMan2000
 
Yes and no. Thin down the paint, brush liberally over the model and allow the wash to get into the nooks and crannies, then sop up the excess. There are numerous videos on YT that will give you an idea of how to do it. Ensure you use the correct technique. Applying wash to a tank model to give it weathering might not get the right look. You want something that looks like a shiny plaque that has a cast metal effect or oxidation.

Dry brushing is using a small amount of paint, with the brush dry and lightly going over the edges.

TazMan2000
Thank you. I'll test it out.
 
What's cool is that you can get similar looks by going opposite directions.

You can start out with a dark base and use drybrushing a lighter colour over it, hitting the high points.

Or you can start out with a lighter base and do a darker wash over it, and while the wash-paint is still wet buff the high points with a rag, revealing the lighter paint underneath.

Either way you have a dark colour down in the crevices and highlights on the raised portions.
 
What's cool is that you can get similar looks by going opposite directions.

You can start out with a dark base and use drybrushing a lighter colour over it, hitting the high points.

Or you can start out with a lighter base and do a darker wash over it, and while the wash-paint is still wet buff the high points with a rag, revealing the lighter paint underneath.

Either way you have a dark colour down in the crevices and highlights on the raised portions.
I know exactly what you are talking about. I just haven't use that method in awhile. I need to experiment with these methods before trying it out on my actual piece.
 

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