Tips for painting a gun?

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by dr_slurpee, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to paint a plastic or resin or some material other than steel, gun and get that blued look? Black paint with some silver rub 'n buff just doesn't quite capture the look of a slightly worn blued gun.

    I've seen some toys painted up and weathered so they look cool and everything, but I really want to capture that oiled and blued steel look.

    Here's a photo example of what I am looking for. I want to replicate the top gun.

    [​IMG]

    Someone here must know some tricks this place is chock-o-block full of tallent.

    Edit: added photo and such.
     
  2. Gytheran

    Gytheran Sr Member

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    Assuming the gun is not real, what material is it made of?
     
  3. franz bolo

    franz bolo Sr Member

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  4. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Heh heh, oops. Yes not a real gun. The material most likely would be resin or plastic, though some parts may be aluminum. I'll revise my first post to better reflect what I am talking about.
     
  5. Mr_Creepy

    Mr_Creepy Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I've heard of people using powdered graphite (from a pencil) and rubbing it into the final paint coat & then sealing it.

    Never tried it myself though.
     
  6. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Bump, still looking for tips.
     
  7. rigormortis

    rigormortis Well-Known Member

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    The way I've done it in the past is to base paint it with Duplicolor Millenium Silver, Matte black, then steel wool the black off where I want the silver to show though.

    To simulate gunsmith bluing, I'd mix some blue pigment (like food coloring) into clearcoat (just enough to shade it ever so slightly).

    If you do it right, it'll look exactly like metal (but use good paints).
     
  8. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thanks for the tips so far, going to try some of them. Anyone else have any further tips?
     
  9. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    bump for more tips...hopefully
     
  10. WinstonWolf359

    WinstonWolf359 Sr Member

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    The Rustoleum "High Heat" or the Krylon "BBQ" black spray paint looks pretty convincing after a good buffing. Nice durable finish, too.
     
  11. Mr. Nagata

    Mr. Nagata Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The graphite trick works great. Our own Moffeaton does great stuff with it. Maybe he'll post some examples. Start with a matte black primer and dust it with graphite powder. Seal with clearcoat. You can also build up the silvery finish to your liking by dusting with more graphite and sealing again.
     
  12. rudolpht

    rudolpht Well-Known Member

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    I usually do that (learned it here) then add silver in wear areas. Kevin's silver under is a good reverse process, but I have found many metalic paints have a hard time sticking to plastic & resin, even with a good wet sandable primer coat. (Wheras the BBQ paint, meant for metal, seems to stick to anything... and everybody :))

    Tim
     
  13. temponaut

    temponaut Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    There's a company called Carom Shot that makes a variety of sprays -- including blues, chromes, and blacks -- specifically for airsoft and model guns made of ABS. I've never tried any of them myself, but the photos on the Carom Shot site look pretty good.

    Here's a link. At the top of the page, you'll see the can of "Blue Steel" alongside a model treated with the product:

    Carom Shot

    If you scroll down the page, you'll see a variety of other sprays, including one called "Metal Blue Coat." The finish created by this product looks a lot like what I think you're after, based on the photo you posted. :eek (The "Zirconer and Crystal" spray, just above the "Metal Blue Coat," might also do the trick.)

    I checked the "How to Order" page in order to see whether Carom Shot will ship outside of Japan, but saw nothing that specifically addresses the issue. However, as the whole page is in Japanese, I'm guessing that they do most or all of their business domestically. Here's the page:

    Carom Shot Contact Information

    I don't see an e-mail address, but they do invite orders by FAX. You could give it a try.

    It's also possible that your local airsoft shop carries Carom Shot products, or that Hobby Link Japan could get the item for you.

    Just thought you'd like to know that there is a product out there specifically designed for what you want to do. :)
     
  14. dr_slurpee

    dr_slurpee Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Now that is interesting...too bad I have no idea what the page says or how hard it would be to order it. No airsoft shops here in Canada to ask at. :(
     
  15. franz bolo

    franz bolo Sr Member

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    I didn't see it mentioned, but Rub-n-Buff might work really well.

    FB
     
  16. Gigatron

    Gigatron Sr Member

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    I usually use flat black, a fine mist of gun metal and ground graphite. You can go to any art supply store and get graphite refills for mechanical pencils. Just ask them for the one with the highest graphite content as most are combinations of graphite and clay. Usually works pretty well.

    -Fred
     
  17. philippes

    philippes Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Paint the piece with black sandable primer; wet sand with the finest sandpaper possible; rub the finish with powdered graphite.

    It's a tedious process, especially at the high points where one tends to sand through, but the results are superb.

    Phil
     
  18. Noeland

    Noeland Sr Member

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    Have you considered trying the cheapo bluing they use for real guns? The brush on type? I used it on a shotgun once, it was AWEFUL and I had to have it professionally re-done, but I don't see why this stuff wouldn't work on plastic or resin. I don'tthink it will melt the material, but you may want to pick up a dollar store squirt gun to test it out.

    Njc-----------------------
     
  19. Sean_Galt

    Sean_Galt New Member

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    Be careful. Bluing is an acid rust process. Could be very negative on aluminum or zinc based fake guns.
     

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