Things you're tired of seeing in movies

Ron

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
To complement it..
Many a Cigar smoker would also dunk their cigar also in various spirits..
Trust me it was certainly a thing.. Especially festive occasions..

Peach snaps was a big thing in Austria ;)
Oh yeah. Scotch and a cigar is like peanut butter and jelly.
 

p51

Sr Member
I have a couple today:
  • As for smoking, movies that take place at any point when it was mainstream to smoke and you don't even see ashtrays in the scene, let alone anyone smoking. These are the same movies where you have to see a women or people of certain ethnicities doing things that in real life you just wouldn't be seeing. Retro-PC-isms at it's finest.
  • A woman who won't order something at a restaurant that she feels that is 'bad' for her, knowing her boyfriend/friend/coworker will, so she can take most of them off his plate. It's never a husband (as no married man would put up with it). In real life, this would only work once or twice before the guy either put the brakes on it or he'd order a plate of whatever for her so he could have his own. But either way, I've never seen it happen in the real world.
 
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somerset fox

Well-Known Member
I’m tired of computer geeks and hackers forgetting where the Return key is. Frantic typing on The keyboard as if typing in a Word document, indecipherable lines of code appear on the screen. never once does the character hit return.
 

Mottrex

Sr Member
Boom Mike's!...
Reflections of crew in mirrors
Actors pretending to drive twisting the wheel all over the show.. And obviously on trailers due to the strange ride height..
 

Iskelderon

Sr Member
Boom Mike's!...
Reflections of crew in mirrors
Actors pretending to drive twisting the wheel all over the show.. And obviously on trailers due to the strange ride height..
A behind-the-scenes video from Star Trek: Picard showed an interesting approach to fixing the ride height.
Not sure if that was a reuse of one of the cars from The Rookie, but essentially the police-styled SUV Seven hijacked in one episode was a stunt vehicle controlled via a driver's cage on the roof, making it look for the cameras like the actors in the cabin are actually driving around.
Would only work with something bottom-heavy like that to keep it from tipping over in corners, but still...
 

batguy

Sr Member
A behind-the-scenes video from Star Trek: Picard showed an interesting approach to fixing the ride height.
Not sure if that was a reuse of one of the cars from The Rookie, but essentially the police-styled SUV Seven hijacked in one episode was a stunt vehicle controlled via a driver's cage on the roof, making it look for the cameras like the actors in the cabin are actually driving around.
Would only work with something bottom-heavy like that to keep it from tipping over in corners, but still...

Hollywood started doing that in the early 2000s. They mount a go-kart type seat on the roof of the car for a stunt driver to control it. The actor(s) ride inside and pretend for the cameras down at their level.

Sometimes they will even do a shot like that from a curbside viewpoint. They show the actor really inside the car and they CGI-erase the driving pod off the car's roof.

miOpe.jpg
 

Sluis Van Shipyards

Legendary Member
This would be from a tv show, The Ranch (along with others), but the characters not talking how normal people talk. I'd chalk it up to bad writing, but they will leave out key information that a normal person would impart in order to keep the drama in the scene. In one episode a relative they just met who has PTSD from Iraq causes a scene when he is startled. He's welcomed back by the father, a Vietnam vet who understands, and his son doesn't want the "whacko" around. All the dad needs to do is say "You haven't served, you don't understand. This is why he's doing that" etc. etc. Instead he just leaves his son thinking the cousin is nuts. Yet none of that was relayed in order to create tension on the show.
 

asalaw

Sr Member
Tired of seeing in movies:

• The deconstruction and emasculation of male heroes, because GIRL POWER!

• Female main characters who are Mary Sues—no flaws, no struggles to earn their way to positive change. They’re born perfect. Rey in Star Wars, Captain Marvel, Mary Suhura in Strange New Hair… it’s a long, long list.

• Impotent, comically unthreatening villains, usually there so the Mary Sue female main character can best him in every encounter. A hero is only as strong as the antagonist he or she defeats. If the hero wins every encounter, what’s the villain even doing there? What can the hero learn? Why should the hero undergo change? Contrast the feckless Yon-Rogg from Captain Marvel with the alien in Alien. Ripley earns her survival and triumph through life-threatening struggle, resourcefulness, and sheer courage. Marvel “has nothing to prove.”

• Shows and films that promise a male hero we’ve enjoyed for years, only to bait-and-switch by using him as a door mat for a preferred female character. Obi-Wan Kenobi, the latest Thor, Luke Skywalker.

I could go on, but it boils down to this: good writing, strong writing, has all but disappeared in favor of woke wish-fulfillment. I’m sick of it.
 

Mottrex

Sr Member
A behind-the-scenes video from Star Trek: Picard showed an interesting approach to fixing the ride height.
Not sure if that was a reuse of one of the cars from The Rookie, but essentially the police-styled SUV Seven hijacked in one episode was a stunt vehicle controlled via a driver's cage on the roof, making it look for the cameras like the actors in the cabin are actually driving around.
Would only work with something bottom-heavy like that to keep it from tipping over in corners, but still...
Yeah seen a few rigs over the years.. Didn't they do something similar in Mad Max Fury Road(that needs a rewatch)
 

Iskelderon

Sr Member
Tired of seeing in movies:

• The deconstruction and emasculation of male heroes, because GIRL POWER!

• Female main characters who are Mary Sues—no flaws, no struggles to earn their way to positive change. They’re born perfect. Rey in Star Wars, Captain Marvel, Mary Suhura in Strange New Hair… it’s a long, long list.

• Impotent, comically unthreatening villains, usually there so the Mary Sue female main character can best him in every encounter. A hero is only as strong as the antagonist he or she defeats. If the hero wins every encounter, what’s the villain even doing there? What can the hero learn? Why should the hero undergo change? Contrast the feckless Yon-Rogg from Captain Marvel with the alien in Alien. Ripley earns her survival and triumph through life-threatening struggle, resourcefulness, and sheer courage. Marvel “has nothing to prove.”

• Shows and films that promise a male hero we’ve enjoyed for years, only to bait-and-switch by using him as a door mat for a preferred female character. Obi-Wan Kenobi, the latest Thor, Luke Skywalker.

I could go on, but it boils down to this: good writing, strong writing, has all but disappeared in favor of woke wish-fulfillment. I’m sick of it.
They just want a ready-made Sarah Connor out of the box without putting in the work, that's what makes it so infuriating!
 

asalaw

Sr Member
They just want a ready-made Sarah Connor out of the box without putting in the work, that's what makes it so infuriating!
And there’s another great heroine—Sarah Connor! How could I forget?! GREAT character arc!

She goes from being a ho-hum nobody, to a frightened girl on the lam from a killer robot, to falling in love with a guerrilla soldier, to killing said robot. She runs, she fails, she learns, she fights, she wins.

So when the second movie opens and she’s a badass trapped in a loony bin, we believe her character, because she earned it in the first movie. If she’d been like that in the beginning of the first film, we’d never believe it, she’d have no arc, she’d be a boring Mary Sue, and Terminator would have flopped.
 

Cephus

Sr Member
They just want a ready-made Sarah Connor out of the box without putting in the work, that's what makes it so infuriating!
But Sarah Connor was never any of that. What they want these days are muscle men with breasts. Sarah Connor or Ellen Ripley were never anything but women. Strong, competent, intelligent, fast-thinking women who used their natural talents to their limit, but didn't try to be anything but what they actually were.
 

asalaw

Sr Member
But Sarah Connor was never any of that. What they want these days are muscle men with breasts. Sarah Connor or Ellen Ripley were never anything but women. Strong, competent, intelligent, fast-thinking women who used their natural talents to their limit, but didn't try to be anything but what they actually were.
Yep. Actually you’re both right—yes, they’re obsessed with creating women who start the story where they should be at the end of their arc; and yes, they’re creating masculinized women at the same time they’re emasculating male heroes. She Hulk: Attorney at Law comes to mind as an extreme example of this.
 

Cephus

Sr Member
Yep. Actually you’re both right—yes, they’re obsessed with creating women who start the story where they should be at the end of their arc; and yes, they’re creating masculinized women at the same time they’re emasculating male heroes. She Hulk: Attorney at Law comes to mind as an extreme example of this.
But even in the comics, she was never that ridiculous. She was still a woman, not the monstrosity they're making today.
 

asalaw

Sr Member
But even in the comics, she was never that ridiculous. She was still a woman, not the monstrosity they're making today.
Absolutely. Both Ripley and Sarah Connor were indisputably feminine. Even Leia was very feminine, though Lucas didn’t give her an arc. As a supporting character to the hero, she didn’t absolutely need one, and making her feisty and smart added humorous irony to the “rescue.” (Luke and Han both had hero arcs, though they start as polar opposites. Luke is the naïve idealist, Han the jaded rogue, but they both end up as heroes.)
 

Iskelderon

Sr Member
Yep. Actually you’re both right—yes, they’re obsessed with creating women who start the story where they should be at the end of their arc; and yes, they’re creating masculinized women at the same time they’re emasculating male heroes. She Hulk: Attorney at Law comes to mind as an extreme example of this.
To be fair, with She-Hulk it's a trope inherent to the comic, so for once they're actually trued to the source material.
 

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