Stapleton hypospray build

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JakeConhale

New Member
Hello. I'm currently working on a new replica prop using the hypospray kit from Stapleton Productions.

I recently made an ODN scanner from Trekprops.de, so I needed something to do.

Currently, I've been able to paint the emitter and made colored liquids for the vials (pictures soon to follow) but ran into a weird issue with painting the body. I'm using a sandable primer spray and automotive spray paints (heard that was what they used in the show), and it worked great for the ODN scanner and the emitter head. The body... well, just take a look.

Hypo1.jpg
Hypo2.jpg


The paint is going on inconsistently. In the first pic, you can see a dull section at the very bottom. I figured that was from inconsistent painting, so I applied a second coat using the recommended light-light-medium wet process on the can. The second photo shows the result - what was just an inconsistency at the bottom is now halfway up the body. It should be uniform shiny, like the neck and top section.

Any idea what's causing this? I didn't wash the items after receiving, possibly a mistake on my part, but even if that was the case, why would the 2nd coat look worse when shouldn't it go on earlier paint? Note: for the 2nd coat I didn't paint the entire item, figured I could just focus on the dull portion at the bottom and it would even out.... now it looks like this.

Bad paint? Bad technique? Bad weather? I haven't got a clue.

The next step is to mask off the blue portions I want to save and paint the grips a nice steel gray. Same goes for the head, but I'm not going to even attempt that until I figure out what's the problem here.

I'm this close to sanding it down and starting from primer again.
 
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Jastor00

New Member
I recently had something similar happen with a Krylon bronze paint for my TNG cricket. No matter what I did, a portion of it always shot matte and a slightly different color. It seemed to basically go away with the clear coat once that was applied. You might try a test of the paint + clear on another piece of scrap. Did you paint outside or inside? Did you make sure to mix the can really well prior to application? Try heating it a bit first in some warm water. Maybe it's a flow issue. Also make sure to adhere to the rules regarding temp and humidity on the can.
 

JakeConhale

New Member
No clear coat yet, was saving that until everything was painted and attached. I'll see if I can find a piece of scrap wood and do a test.

I've been painting outside. I finally got a dropcloth rather than just spraying on the community grass (figured grass gets mowed, it'd go away rather than the sidewalk). Usually in the late afternoon. I usually shake pretty good but can't guarantee every time. Not sure about temp and humidity, it's above 70* that's for sure, but *shrug*.

Maybe I'll try another coat without going back to primer, this is really bugging me.
 

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AnubisGuard

Sr Member
I recently had something similar happen with a Krylon bronze paint for my TNG cricket. No matter what I did, a portion of it always shot matte and a slightly different color. It seemed to basically go away with the clear coat once that was applied. You might try a test of the paint + clear on another piece of scrap. Did you paint outside or inside? Did you make sure to mix the can really well prior to application? Try heating it a bit first in some warm water. Maybe it's a flow issue. Also make sure to adhere to the rules regarding temp and humidity on the can.

I believe uneven gloss/matte is called "flashing" and I've had that happen a lot with automotive paints. It's a temperature and humidity issue. The best solution, like you said, is to heat the can beforehand, but also to paint the item in direct sunlight so the surface stays warm as the solvent evaporates. The more humid it is the more important it is to keep the surface warm so the solvent "flashes off" correctly. If all else fails, a good buffing with a cloth or a clear coat will fix it.
 

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