My $250 "Bucky Rescue" Captain America

sswift

Active Member
Well it looks like the gloves getting destroyed wasn't all bad. I found a new brand at Walmart and they're more accurate in color than the other ones were. The gloves in the film are a light yellow btw. I don't know why I thought they were brown. The old gloves I had were more of a tan shade. Though the iPhone doesn't really reproduce the color properly, so they look yellow here.

Anyway, roughed the new gloves up a bit with a scouring pad, soaked them, and tossed em in a 170 degree oven since I don't have a dryer at my new place. Not gonna use any coffee this time.
 

sswift

Active Member
Finished weathering the jacket today. I decided not to tear it up for the moment.

Here's what I did to it:
1) Applied rubbing alcohol to reduce the shine. Was somewhat successful.
2) Roughed it up with fine grit sandpaper. This didn't do much.
3) Roughed it up with coarse grit sandpaper. This scratched it up in places. I didn't go too crazy with it.
4) Applied black shoe polish to it. Kinda worked, but it took a long time to apply and stunk up my kitchen. Would not use this method again.
5) Soaked it in water, wrung it out, and then put it in a 215 degree oven for four to five hours to dry out. This shrank it somewhat and toughened the leather a little. Good results, but next time I'd use a dryer if I had one available. Could not really see where I'd scuffed it up or rubbed the black polish on it anymore once I was done baking it, so it would be better to save the sandpaper till after.
6) Roughed it up again with medium grit sandpaper, focusing on the elbows. This gave the best results of the different grades of sandpaper.
7) Applied black leather dye, dabbing some onto a paper towel, swiping it across the jacket then rubbing it in, or working it in in a circular fashion to get more even coverage in an area. This worked much better than the shoe polish, and had no odor at all. Almost all the blackening you see on the final jacket is this dye.
8) Scuffed the jacket up once again with the medium grit paper to add another layer of detail on top of the areas I hit with a lot of black dye.

And that's it. If I did it again, I'd wet it, dry it in a dryer, scuff it with medium grit paper, rub in black dye, and scuff it up again.

There's still one more bit of weathering I've gotta do that I just remembered, and that's hit it with some fuller's earth then wipe away the excess.

Anyway here's some pics of the jacket, as well as the holster I hit with brown shoe polish, and the new pair of gloves:











 

sswift

Active Member
Oh, I did try one other thing with the jacket. Olive oil. I applied a bit to one area and I didn't see any darkening, and I didn't think applying multiple coats was going o darken the jacket significantly and I didn't really want to soak it in oil, so I quickly gave up on that idea.
 

sswift

Active Member


Sanded the helmet and began painting it and the shield today.

First pass on the shield wasn't great. I used my usual technique of keeping the spraycan well away from the surface and misting it lightly at random to avoid drips. However this resulted in a sandy appearance with the Krylon Chrome paint.

So, I let it dry a while, buffed it down with some steel wool, and gave it another go. This time I tried moving the spraycan to within a few inches of the shield, and I noticed when I swept it across the shield I got the mirror finish I wanted, so I carefully went back and forth from the bottom of the shield to the top without stopping. I was painting at night, so I could see by the light of the porch where the leading edge was cloudy, but turned into a mirror finish with the next pass overlapping it.

Next time I'll be able to paint will most likely be Saturday, and then I will finish up the A on the helmet and the front of the shield.
 

sswift

Active Member
Decided since the back of the shield came out so nice that I should order another shade of blue for the front, since the shield has a darker blue than the helmet. So, to go with the shock red and shock white Montana Gold Acrylic, I ordered Shock Dark Blue. The helmet btw, is Blue Magic.
 

sswift

Active Member
Got my goggles in today. That's a load off my mind.

Just took a look at the ribbed thing in the middle, and it's made of rubber and the ribs are like fins, so a razor made short work of them, and a little sandpaper smoothed things over pretty well. Even though it's not totally accurate with the U shape still there, I may just leave it. If I cut it off it would be hard to attach a new piece and make it flexible. I don't have screws tiny enough to replace the rivets they used to hold the bridge in place. I'll probably end up painting it with the same chrome paint I'll use over the existing chrome however. The existing chrome is too shiny and the paint I used on the back of the shield seems to have the right amount of shininess to it to match the screen used goggles. I don't know what the paint will do when the rubber flexes but I can always sand it off if it cracks and looks bad.

In addition to that, I need to replace that elastic band with a white one, paint the black buckle chrome, and get some white fabric paint for the foam padding. Once all that's done, I'll apply Fuller's Earth liberally.

Speaking of which, for the shield, I'm gonna mix some Fuller's earth with water to make some mud which I can splatter across it. I think that was the intention in the film, as the shield is made of metal, not wood as some had postulated. Gotta scuff it up some too and add that bullet scratch. Not sure how to add black scuff marks. Might try the sole of my work shoes. Will be a while before I can do that though. Blue paint won't arrive till next Wednesday and it'll need at least a few days to dry and set up so it won't just scratch off.
 

sswift

Active Member
Well, sprayed the chrome portion of the goggles with chrome paint to give it a duller appearance. Probably should have just scuffed it up. Didn't realize the stitching holding the pads on would look so bad once painted.

Next step will probably be to let them dry, then remove the stitching, fill the holes with epoxy putty, and glue the frames into place on the pads instead. Then I'll repaint them.
 

sswift

Active Member
If you bought a pair of these goggles, be careful weathering them! It turns out the frames aren't plastic at all as they appear, but copper! The chrome layer is also extremely thin, so the lightest scratching with medium grit paper will cut right through it.
 

sswift

Active Member
After the paint dried a bit, I decided to remove those ugly silver painted threads and buff the goggles with steel wool, just to see what it would look like. Some of the paint wasn't fully dry and rubbed off in places revealing the chrome underneath. The rest became a bit dull and grey, like what chrome might look like after it's aged or peeled off and revealed primer underneath. It was a pretty neat look. But the shiny chrome bits bothered me, so I scuffed those with the sandpaper as I mentioned above. This revealed some copper which looked bad. It was raining out so I couldn't repaint those areas, but it occurred to me that I had a silver paint marker, so decided to give that a go. It looked pretty good, going well with the rest of the patina I'd created.

I'll probably keep them this way, and I don't think I'll fill the holes where the threads were after all because I'd have to repaint the goggles after and the holes look neat anyway.

Next step is to glue the frames to the pads, then paint the pads with white fabric paint, and make the new elastic straps.
 

sswift

Active Member
Well the fabric paint was a waste of money. Stuff works great... on fabric. On rubberized goggle pads, not so much. Guess I'll have to resort to spray paint. I think I have some white plastic primer. That should do the job.

[/edit]

Hm, no plastic primer. Well, I guess I'll try the shock white Montana Gold Acrylic. I think that stuff might be less harsh on the plastic than the Krylon I have.
 
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macogle

New Member
FWIW the goggles used in the film are B-7 type Aviator Goggles. I'm having no luck finding cheap copies but there are some originals floating around certain auction sites.
 

sswift

Active Member
That's the same problem I had, finding a cheap replica. I didn't want to spend $200-$1000 on a pair of actual aviator goggles, seeing as the rest of my costume is less then accurate. :)
 

sswift

Active Member
In case anyone's wondering, I did some research and it looks like the A on his helmet is Arial Bold, with faux Bold enabled, and it is roughly 2.5" tall, and 2.5" from the base of the helmet.
 

sswift

Active Member
Some more information:

According to my calculations, which are based on the size of Cap's helmet, as that's was the only measurement I had to go off of, it looks like the star on Cap's chest is roughly 5" tall, with each side of the star being 2" long. The star is placed roughly 2.25" below the top of his collar.
 

sswift

Active Member
Ugh, I don't know how I'm gonna sew this star. I cut one out of that satin fabric this evening, but the corners of the star leave almost no material to fold underneath for a clean edge and this fabric frays like crazy. Perhaps I should go back to my original idea of cutting a star out of leather... or maybe I could find some of that craft foam Penguin used on his goggles, and use that. I want to replace the crummy looking foam on my goggles anyway.
 
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