Measuring for helmet

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AtomicGearworks

New Member
I am in the process of designing a custom Mandalorian costume. The next piece I'm planning to work on is the helmet. However, I'm having difficulty with it. Since I'm planning to 3D print it, I would like to not have to do it multiple times, since it's a very time intensive print, not to mention the amount of filament involved.

So what I'm trying to figure out is how to measure for the helmet, so I can make the model the right size before printing. I know my hat size, but I don't think that's enough to make an accurate sized model.

Anyone who has made a Mandalorian or similar helmet in the past have any advice on taking such measurements?
 

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TazMan2000

Master Member
Get someone to measure the length and width of your head. Import this head Full Size Human Head Model for resting headsets on by lehthanis into TinkerCad (cut off the bottom part). Size the head until it is similar to your head size. Import the head into CURA or whatever slicer you use to see how both objects interact with each other. You may be able to import the helmet into TinkerCad if the STL is under 25MB and not too complex.

TazMan2000
 

JPH

Sr Member
Okay, call me a conspiracy theorist, but...

I get aluminum foil and fold several sheets together, then put them on your head and crumple it down to a perfect fit, snug helmet.

Gentle remove it and coat in resin or fiberglass and you now have a perfect reference for your head!

You can also cover the foil in duct tape.

No two real-life heads are the same. Some heads are pointy in front, some flat, a Mando helmet is gonna pinch you somewhere, and you dont want a floppy front or back with an uncomfortably tight contra coup (opposing) end. I know, that's what padding is for, but it is pretty satisfying when you put on a helmet, AND IT FITS PERFECT!

It also keep *them* from sucking out your brain or mind control.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
JPH , What would be the reason to create a physical copy of your head to see if it would fit inside a STL? You already have your physical head as a reference to see if the helmet would fit. I'm thinking AtomicGearworks wants to size the STL to his head measurements before he prints it. I can understand that spending time and money printing out a helmet that doesn't fit is a waste. Yes everybody's head is different, but mostly they are roundish. ...Mostly
But using tinfoil to prevent unscrupulous government agencies from reading your mind is a stroke of genius. :lol:

TazMan2000
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
What one can do is to cut a slice from the helmet horizontally (A cm thickness) and see if it would fit over your nose and ears.

TazMan2000
 

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JPH

Sr Member
JPH , What would be the reason to create a physical copy of your head to see if it would fit inside a STL? You already have your physical head as a reference to see if the helmet would fit. I'm thinking AtomicGearworks wants to size the STL to his head measurements before he prints it. I can understand that spending time and money printing out a helmet that doesn't fit is a waste. Yes everybody's head is different, but mostly they are roundish. ...Mostly
But using tinfoil to prevent unscrupulous government agencies from reading your mind is a stroke of genius. :lol:

TazMan2000
TazMan2000,

Even holding a ruler to your head and measuring can have inaccuracies. Perspective, placing a ruler at a less-than-perfect 90 degree angle can throw off measurements. Who wants to find *that* out after a four day print and hours of cleanup?

If you want generic, go generic. If you want "fits you like a glove," then use personal reference. If the hardened aluminum helmet goes on and off like a dream, my work here is done.

Just like people who make duct-tape dummies of themselves for a perfect fit, why not do the same for your noggin? I make cheap templates all the time.

****unless the voices tell you otherwise****

Aluminum foil is cheap, and a getting it right the first time saves you time, supplies and do-overs. A little more time uo front, alot less time and $$$ later.

I made myself some goggles that fit me perfectly, but those same goggles on a 3 year-barely fit! The kid looks normal, but has a flatter face.

***Ut oh! Did I just say I am deformed?!?***

I was not in any way attacking your suggestion, your suggestion is GREAT! But I have used the foil reference head because I have printed and casted helmets, given them away as gifts, and everyones' measurements has their quirks.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
JPH
I didn't take it as attacking my suggestion at all. We all have different ideas and perspectives. It's sad that we have to apologize for disagreeing with someone on here, but everyone knows there are "sensitive" people on here that take any disagreement or new suggestion as a personal attack. Those people need to grow up, or see a psychologist. We ALL have different ideas and there is always a better way. Closing any discussion with whiny fits, is a waste. I don't know how many times I put in a suggestion, thinking it was a great idea, then a few posts later, I read a suggestion form another member that was a far better suggestion than mine.

One can use a corrugated cardboard cut out for measuring people's heads or those big wood clamps. But you are right about parallax error when reading measurements from a ruler.

You have a great idea for making a "mold" of your head in order to design something. In fact, a whole body mannequin would be a good idea for someone who wants to make a form fitting costume. Perhaps one can make it inflatable at key points, as most of us get a bit rounder as we age, myself included. :D But for sizing an STL you have to be slightly generic in a head shape. Noses, cheeks, ears, and any other protuberances on one's head have to be "digitally" simulated. It may not be perfect, but its a good start. If your wife conks you on the head for buying too many props or collectables, you can use Meshmixer to recreate the bump and have the helmet fit better.:lol:

TazMan2000
 

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