Mad Max Interceptor scratch build Query...

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CB2001

Master Member
The Jack Reacher car was a Chevelle that is very popular in its own right. They already had a kit for it. That's the difference.

In the 'states an XB Falcon is the MM car and nothing else, and Fury Road gave that car its first 30 seconds of screen time in the last 30 years.
But Mad Max in itself is an iconic film series, much like Back To The Future. Every model released for a DeLorean in the U.S. have all been BTTF related, from such companies as AMT/ERTL, Polar Lights and Sunstar. The closest to a non-BTTF DeLorean you can find is the 1/18 scale DeLorean diecast that doesn't have any BTTF parts on it. Other than BTTF DeLoreans, there has never been a non-BTTF DeLorean model kit released. Yet, that hasn't stopped model makers from making tons of BTTF DeLorean model kits, because the car is only recognized as the BTTF time machine and nothing else. The same is true with Ghostbusters and the Echo-1. There hasn't been any other model kit for the 1959 Cadillac Miller-Meteor. Yet, there's been several model releases of the Ecto-1 and Ecto-1A from the first two films (and Polar Lights has also done their own release of the Ghostbusters Ecto-1), and the vehicle is iconic and well recognized. And those model kits have sold.

Trust me, it's not just the Interceptor that those model companies missed out on. It's all the vehicles from the film series itself, including those in Fury Road. I'm betting that if one of them did a MM line, the Interceptor would be one of the top sellers because the car is popular and iconic (just as much popular and iconic in its own right, much like a Chevelle).

But we're diverging from the topic, which is scratch building an Interceptor model, and methods of possibly kit bashing one as well.
 

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batguy

Sr Member
I agree that a mainstream 1/25 MM Interceptor/XB Falcon styrene kit is probably worth tooling. I'm just pointing out reasons why it hasn't already happened and Jack Reacher does get one.

The bestselling car model of all time is the General Lee and the underlying '69 Charger tooling is in terrible shape. It's ancient tooling dating back to when the car was brand new. It went through several alterations before it even was used for the General Lee in the first place, and it has been altered more times since then. (In fact I'm a Dodge Charger nut and I'm not very happy with any of the model kits out there for it. Not even the R/M "good one" that everyone uses now.)

I'm just saying that the tooling doesn't always go where it belongs in the modeling industry.
 

CB2001

Master Member
I agree that a mainstream 1/25 MM Interceptor/XB Falcon styrene kit is probably worth tooling. I'm just pointing out reasons why it hasn't already happened and Jack Reacher does get one.

The bestselling car model of all time is the General Lee and the underlying '69 Charger tooling is in terrible shape. It's ancient tooling dating back to when the car was brand new. It went through several alterations before it even was used for the General Lee in the first place, and it has been altered more times since then. (In fact I'm a Dodge Charger nut and I'm not very happy with any of the model kits out there for it. Not even the R/M "good one" that everyone uses now.)

I'm just saying that the tooling doesn't always go where it belongs in the modeling industry.
I can agree about the General Lee and its kit (but because it uses a slightly different body style. In fact, I've looked at possibly buying one of those R/M "good one" Dodge Charger kits you've mentioned and kit bash it with the less accurate AMT/ERTL General Lee model kit I have, using this instructional page), but I never knew the '69 Charger tooling was in bad shape, and may have to try to look around for a better kit to use (but then again, I've been out of model building for a while and have been looking to get back into it). But I definitely get the whole retooling thing. AMT/ERTL released a Knight Rider KITT kit recently that had the wrong body, as it was missing some key details from the car in the show (for example, the side vents on the fenders are not in the recent release, despite the fact that they reused the original artwork from the MPC kit, which does feature the vents clearly). I suspect that over the years, the original mold that was apparently used was the KITT mold, purchased by AMT/ERTL from MPC, and used that for later models with some retooling done on certain parts. I actually have a Snap Together kit of a Pontiac Formula dragster from AMT/ERTL that happens to have the notches for the scanner light for KITT still molded on the front, though the body is a hard-top and not a T-Top.

A lot of people swear by the Japanese model kit of the Interceptor mentioned previously (the one that I keep finding in the triple digits), so there must be something going right with that particular company (I've also heard of a lot of KR fans purchasing the KITT model they released and the positive comments about its accuracy). So, for a Charger model, you may have to consider looking at foreign model companies. Maybe one of them has a better Charger model with a tooling that looks correct.

Again, we're going off topic (sorry to the OP and those who are looking at this topic), but I definitely like chatting about model making and get what you're saying. I apologize to you as well if it seems I'm ignoring your information or if I came off at all rude (I assure, it wasn't my intention if I did). :)
 

batguy

Sr Member
It's cool. We all get strong feelings about our hobbies. :lol


The General Lee kit tooling dates back to when the car was brand new (a full decade before the TV show even debuted!) and it has been reworked/altered about 5 or 6 times. Not to mention being run for zillions of kits. The hood scoops, the door scoops, the bodylines on the front fenders, the whole back window area . . . you can tell it's all been screwed with in the past. There is hardly a panel on that body that hasn't seen some kind of sloppy altering over the years. I have a model kit produced off it 45 years ago and it's much, much better than the current kits. That poor car body really needs a fresh tooling copied from the model bodies it produced decades ago.

The Revell/Monogram Charger kit is basically a good item as model kits go. Lots of detail and things do fit together well. But I can see imperfections in the Charger's body dimensions in a bunch of places. As bad as the GL kit is, the raw dimensions of the Charger body (at least started out) perfect. The newer R/M kit dimensions are "off" all over the place in subtle ways.


BTW: The General Lee prop cars in the TV series ran more 14x7" wheels than anything else. The Eckler Vette rims have nice detail but IMO the dimensions are too wide for the standard GL look. The GL-kit-supplied wheels (which look like 15x7") are the right choice IMO. Some GLs occasionally showed up on TV with 15x8.5" wheels like the Eckler Vette ones but they were in the minority.


The Japanese Interceptor kit seems to consistently demand a lot of money and it does produce some good results. Probably worth it IMO.
 
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Tan Djarka

Sr Member
I've currently got a kitbashed interceptor in the works (though "currently" is a bit of a misnomer, as I started it over ten years ago). It's based on the '70 Torino. I shortened the rear of the body a bit, filled the furrows in the front fender tops, and will use the hood from a '73 Mustang. While the Aoshima kit would've been easier, at the time I started the project I couldn't find a source for the kit.

In the past I've made two attempts at replicating the Mad Max mobile. The first was based on a '77 Mustang hatch back with a '79 front clip and a '73 hood, with 1/35 scale oil drums and gas cans to dress the back. The second, which I tore down to scavenge parts (some of which will go to the "current" build) was based on a '70 Chevelle (Monogram's 3-in-1 "Heavy Chevy"), with a modified Monte Carlo SS front clip, air tanks from a Robotech "Aqualo" for the gas tanks, and the usual dressing.
 

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Tan Djarka

Sr Member
Wow a '70 Chevelle attempt? That car had crossed my mind too. Any pics of that one?
Sadly, no. I tore it down before I thought to document it with a good camera. I think I have some out of focus polaroid prints, but no way to scan or upload them. Basically I used the body with a widened Monte Carlo SS front clip, though I did modify the rear deck so there was no longer the inward angle bewteen the rear window and trunk area. It wasn't perfect, but it turned out okay. Maybe if I can figure the whole process out, I can upload pics of the '77 Mustang version.
 

CB2001

Master Member
At any rate, it's hard to argue with the Mustang/Torino hybrid approach.
I totally agree.

BTW, I know I said the 1979-1984 year model Ford Mustang may be as close you can get for the front end for the U.S., but what about the 1988 Ford Mustang? Or is that too smooth/short/rounded? Maybe with a little modification it'd make a decent front end?



BTW, for kit bashing and terminology, has anyone ever referred to kit bashing as "frankensteining"?
 
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batguy

Sr Member
The movie car's nose begs for scratchbuilding.

Even if donor kits of other cars didn't cost money it still looks easier to scratch the nose IMO. Nothing off-the-shelf is very close. The movie nose was made of a few very simple shapes & flat surfaces. And whatever you use on your model would need to fit the front end of your car perfectly just to look right.
 

Tan Djarka

Sr Member
I dug out those pictures and, well, that Chevelle looked alot worse than I remembered.

For the current iteration, I'm scratch building the front end. The angle of the Torino's nose is just about right, and I've added a pair of 80's era Dodge Daytona headlights and a widened bumper that came from the parts box (a truck, maybe?). I'll fill the space between the headlights with styrene, and as this is the RW version, I won't bother with the chin spoiler.
 

CB2001

Master Member
The movie car's nose begs for scratchbuilding.

Even if donor kits of other cars didn't cost money it still looks easier to scratch the nose IMO. Nothing off-the-shelf is very close. The movie nose was made of a few very simple shapes & flat surfaces. And whatever you use on your model would need to fit the front end of your car perfectly just to look right.
I know the very front will have to be scratch built (or would have to be a 1985 Chevy Camaro), but it never hurts to ask because sometimes its easier to modify than to scratch build. But, if I did do the front, I would use that paper model I linked for a template to transfer it's shape onto styrene, despite that the front (fenders and all) would come off as more boxy.

I dug out those pictures and, well, that Chevelle looked alot worse than I remembered.

For the current iteration, I'm scratch building the front end. The angle of the Torino's nose is just about right, and I've added a pair of 80's era Dodge Daytona headlights and a widened bumper that came from the parts box (a truck, maybe?). I'll fill the space between the headlights with styrene, and as this is the RW version, I won't bother with the chin spoiler.
You know, I didn't even think about the 1986 Dodge Daytona's front end. It has a better shape that's close to the same shape as the front of the Falcon, especially if you took the fenders and modified them a bit:

 
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leyrich

Well-Known Member
Hi superbeast if you are interested I have these parts DSC00256.JPGif you need them for the interceptor build


leyrich

good luck
 

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oddjob93

New Member
If I might add, take a look at a Revell Monza Super Spyder kit from 1979-80 time frame. The front end is about right if you cover the headlights. I think with that frount end and the Torino rear end you'd have something close. I've had the Monza kit all these years and have often thought about "Mad Maxing" it, but it's such a good looking model on it's own.
 

CB2001

Master Member
If I might add, take a look at a Revell Monza Super Spyder kit from 1979-80 time frame. The front end is about right if you cover the headlights. I think with that frount end and the Torino rear end you'd have something close. I've had the Monza kit all these years and have often thought about "Mad Maxing" it, but it's such a good looking model on it's own.


Not bad. The fenders are pretty shapely, but the front definitely invokes a similar design.

BTW, I just had a thought. I know some people have done this kit bash of putting the front of one car onto another. But I have to ask: how do they do it? Do they remove the front of the car from the doors forward and then use styrene on the inside of the body to glue and re-enforce the structure, using plastic putty to fill in the seam where the cut was made? Or do they just keep the fenders of the body and just secure the front half the body (similar to the 1997 Ford Mustang models, as pictured in this instruction sheet, from AMT/ERTL)?

Also, I never got an answer to this question: For kit bashing and terminology, has anyone ever referred to kit bashing as "frankensteining"?
 

kruleworld

Well-Known Member
BTW, I just had a thought. I know some people have done this kit bash of putting the front of one car onto another. But I have to ask: how do they do it? Do they remove the front of the car from the doors forward and then use styrene on the inside of the body to glue and re-enforce the structure, using plastic putty to fill in the seam where the cut was made? Or do they just keep the fenders of the body and just secure the front half the body (similar to the 1997 Ford Mustang models, as pictured in this instruction sheet, from AMT/ERTL)?
I'd be inclined to cut the very front off the torino and fit the other front, keeping most or all of the torino fenders. a lot will depend on how it will fit together.
when building the Vermin Holden from Mad Max 2, i cut only the front panel off and built the new one directly on the old fenders

you can see some work progress photos here http://s1307.photobucket.com/user/aussiemuscle308/library/Model Cars/Mad Max 2/Road Warrior WIP

Also, I never got an answer to this question: For kit bashing and terminology, has anyone ever referred to kit bashing as "frankensteining"?
not that i've heard, although i'd use it in context of combining two totally different cars, like my elcamino dodge charger
 

CB2001

Master Member
Beautiful work on both of those models, krule. Checked out your in-progress shots, definitely find those worth the look. :D
 

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