"How to" Static LED Numbers? Help, please

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by Generalurko, Feb 9, 2006.

  1. Generalurko

    Generalurko Well-Known Member

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    Pals,

    Hey. I wanted to start working on my Korben Dallas Pistol (from Fifth Element). The gun has a "999" led counter display on the side as well as a red LED in the front. It also has a switch towards the back. (see photo)

    Now I have NO electronics knowledge. I've seen the little LED Numbers and LED Bulbs at Radio Shack, but I don't know how to make them work. A while ago (I mean, like a year, at least) someone had posted how to get the LED Numbers to say "999" (they would be static, and not count down), but I couldn't find it. I also need to have the front LED bulb attached to the numbers, so that when the switch is turned on, both the numbers and the bulb light up.

    I know that there's issues with the battery needing to match the voltage of everything, but again I'm an electronics idiot (I even solder poorly).

    Does anyone know of any tutorials? Or has anyone with a Korben gun (or pulse rifle) built what I'm describing?

    Any ideas where to get the switch, or even the numbers and bulb (besides Radio Shack)?

    Any advice or help would be appreciated. :)

    Thanks,
    Chris
    (Electronics Idiot Extraordinaire)
     
  2. masterjedi322

    masterjedi322 Sr Member

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    The numeric displays, that I've seen at least, are actually a bunch of small LEDs. If you know the part number of the display you're using, you can download the spec sheet, which will show you what pins go to what LEDs. From there, you can hook up the appropriate power and ground connections to the LEDs you want to light up to display the number of your choice.

    Hope that helps get you moving. :)

    Sean
     
  3. JOATRASH FX

    JOATRASH FX Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Make sure you get a LED counter that can take a 9-volt or other small battery. (you might also want to get a small on/off switch and a connector for the battery.

    To add to what Sean said:

    You hook up the battery connector and switch to the appropriate pins on the counter. I don't know crap about electronics either besides "plus goes here and minus goes here" and maybe some basic car stuff, but when you look at the diagram/chart for the counter it will be self-explanatory. All you have to do then is match up the other pins in the correct "pattern" to get the number you want. Pin #5 connected to pin #8 (or whatever) might produce a "3" in the first slot.

    Did that make any sense? :confused

    When you solder, try not to get too close to the counter- you could burn it out if you'r really unlucky. Not that they cost much mind you, but it's still time down the drain.

    I did a "73" on my Pulse rifle and it was really not that hard.

    Good luck.

    /Joe F
    Sweden
     
  4. masterjedi322

    masterjedi322 Sr Member

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    One important thing to add: DO NOT HOOK THE BATTERY DIRECTLY TO THE COUNTER... With no resistor to limit the current, you will burn out the LEDs.

    I would suggest getting a book on electronic basics or reading up on the web. With some basic theory, building LED drivers is not all that difficult. But, if you don't know what you're doing, you could really damage something, or someone, so BE CAREFUL.

    Sean
     
  5. Generalurko

    Generalurko Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for responding. Unfortunately, I'm really lost as to what you guys are saying. I guess I'll have to just contact hyperdyne or someone to see if they can do it.

    Thanks again. :)

    Chris
     
  6. SWFreak

    SWFreak Well-Known Member

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    Chris, let me know what you find. I have a kit as well that I'm going to build up.

    Those are some nice referance pic's, got any more like that?
     
  7. SWFreak

    SWFreak Well-Known Member

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    I did some poking around at Mouser.com They are four small three digit displays. They are made by Fairchild, here's the spec sheet.
    You can use the Fairchild part numbers to find them at Mouser.
     
  8. WookieeGunner

    WookieeGunner Well-Known Member

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  9. SWFreak

    SWFreak Well-Known Member

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    E-mail sent.

    Thanks.
     
  10. Roughneckone

    Roughneckone Sr Member

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    E-mail sent too, thanks also.

    VBR
    Roughneckone
     
  11. WookieeGunner

    WookieeGunner Well-Known Member

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