Help with finding DOOM Guy armor pepakura.

Discussion in 'Replica Costumes' started by Marluxia, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Hello,

    My next cosplay idea is of DOOM Guy, from the original DOOM games.

    Image here: http://dudelol.com/oldimgs/high-resolution-doom-cover-art.jpg

    I was wondering if there were any Pepakura files for this out, or if there was anything similar I could work with? I tried the 405th, but to no prevail (I only found DOOM 3 stuff), so I am checking here.

    I was thinking of just taking football shoulder pads and spray painting them, but they are too expensive.

    Thanks!
     
  2. PepMaster

    PepMaster Sr Member

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    I made files a long time ago, but the link has since been removed and I don't have the files on my computer anymore. Getting the 3D Model again should'nt be a problem though.
     
  3. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Thanks! any help is appreciated. Are they going to be in a .pdo extension?
     
  4. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    I looked into doing this armor years ago - I did a couple of prototypes using bmx armor.

    You might look into doing it with EVA foam, the design lends itself well to that medium.
     
  5. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    I was thinking along the line of Football shoulder pads... until I saw the price, I can imagine the same, if not more, with BMX pads.

    I don't want to spend a whole lot of money on this. That is why I opted for Pepakura....
     
  6. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    I have picked up several sets of football pads off an auction site for $15-$30 for Road Warrior project I was working on.

    Part of the difficulty in recreating the original Doom armor is the lack of good source material. The game graphics just are not high res enough to work with.

    Here is an updated one I found, looks pretty close to the original -

    [​IMG]

    I still think EVA foam is your best bet, Even if you could find a pep file, the armor would not fit well as rigid armor, and lots of mods will be needed so that you could move your arms, and get some flexibility in the midsection.

    Check out the EVA Foam mass effect armor that RPF member EvilFX has done :

    [​IMG]

    (The full thread is here : http://www.therpf.com/f24/mass-effect-2-n7-armor-builds-89795/ )

    if you are just making a one-off set of armor, this would be the way to go I would think.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2011
  7. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    Been doing some searching, found this on a cosplay site :
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  8. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Thanks.

    I can actually make that mobile. This isn't my first armor project. I was planning attaching the sleeve parts to the chest plate by use of elastic strips. I was thinking 4, one on top of shoulder, one in the armpit area and one on the front and back.

    I, however, never worked with EVA foam. I did a quick search and skimmed through a few things, I have to things to ask:

    1- Is there a retail place where I can buy in person? Home Depot had this: Foam Flooring from Best Step | The Home Depot - Model BS100-4HDT but not sure if this what you mean.

    2- Would Hot Glue work with this stuff? If not, what adhesive would I need?
     
  9. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    yep, that's the stuff - if you search the web you can find different thicknesses and colors too.

    Contact cement seems to work the best, hot melt glue is good for temporary fitting, but proabably won't hold, and may melt the foam.
     
  10. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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  11. PepMaster

    PepMaster Sr Member

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    The model I have is just a OBJ Model that still needs to be broken down and unfolded. I'm getting ready to be gone for a few days so I'll leave this here for you.
    Doom Guy.obj
    [​IMG]

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
     
  12. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    The exercise mats don't specify what they're made out of, but if they are EVA, they should be fine. (EVA is a denser foam, and forms and sands nicely) at any rate they are probably too thick.

    You will need to seal the foam before painting, most builders are using "plasti-dip" spray to seal it, but a watered down solution of elmer's glue can work also. After you seal it, you can use just about any spray paint.

    As with any project, it's always best to test the glue, sealant & paint on scrap material, just to make sure the materials you have slelected will work together.
     
  13. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    PepMaster: Thanks!

    Iceman: Thanks once more. Is there a way to keep the curves of the armor in form? Or are just going to be in form once worn? I understand the gauntlets and other cylindrical pieces keeping form, but I'm kinda worried about the breastplate becoming flat once taken off...
     
  14. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple of ways to do that, one is to cut small wedges ("darts" in the garment industry) out of the piece to be curved, and glue it together. The other way is to heat the foam and form it by hand, using a heat gun, but be careful not to get it too hot.

    CHeck the other EVA foam costume builds in this forum,, particularly the Ironman suits, most builders have posted pictures of both these methods.
     
  15. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Ah, yes, scoring. At least, that is the term used for curving foamboard in the same fashion. Same idea though. I think I'm set then.

    Thanks!
     
  16. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    Don;t forget to post some pics here, I'd like to see how it turns out - I've been tempted to do a new version of mine, since I have long since cannibalized the armor and helmet for other costumes.


    Speaking of helmets, I did find a file someone did of the UAC marine helmet, though it's pretty rough -


    Doom Marine Helmet Papercraft


    Depending on your budget, helmets used for Kyaking have a similar base shape, and aren't too expensive - (Especially if you can find one used )
     
  17. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    I shall!!!

    Awwww... dammit, lol. I went already bought a paintball helmet to use as a base. Oh well. Lets see what I could do with what I have first.
     
  18. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    A paintball helmet should do fine, the marine helmet is very wide around the base, so you'll have to modify whatever you start with.
     
  19. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    So, I decided to make this a low budget costume (moving in a few months) and returning to my Cardboard and Hotglue method. Like how I used to make this: My Colonial Marine Armor from Aliens

    So far here is my WIP of DOOM Guy's helmet:

    [​IMG]
    Link: WIP DOOM Guy helmet by ~CosmicAngelSephiroth on deviantART

    Almost finished assembling the helmet. I'm going to keep a lot of the holes as holes, so I can actually breathe and not get a heat injury (which happens to me). Then going to spray paint it.

    I've heard of a weathering process called "Black Washing". Does anyone know how this done? Depends on its done, I might do that with this armor set as test, before moving onto more armor projects.


    UPDATE: I know it may not look too well in the photo (camera is dead and have to use my phone), in which I'm sorry. The spray enamel is curing now and its looking pretty good.... I'll post a better pic tomorrow, after it finishes curing.
     
  20. moose

    moose Active Member

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    Just for the record, if you're going to use foam, hot glue is the adhesive of choice for builders. It holds the foam incredibly well, probably due to the fact that it does indeed melt the foam it comes in contact with, which allows the two pieces you're gluing to meld together. Just my 2 cents. Good luck!

    Edit: and leave it to me to not read your last comment. However, if you DO ever plan on using foam, now you know :p
     
  21. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Hot Glue is the my choice of adhesives regardless....

    Edit (to the above edit): And knowing is half the battle!
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  22. moose

    moose Active Member

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    Aye. Was just clarifying versus contact cement (not saying cement doesn't work, I've never tried) and since you asked :p
     
  23. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    Yeah, but I decided against foam for this project... Need to the save the money.
     
  24. moose

    moose Active Member

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    Yup, I know how that goes. Ended up spending way more than I intended on my last build. In any case, keep us updated, I haven't seen this one yet so I'm looking forward to it!
     
  25. Marluxia

    Marluxia New Member

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    The helmet is finished!

    [​IMG]

    I used Rust-oleum spray gloss protective enamel for the paint. Moving onto the chest armor.
     
  26. greylocke

    greylocke Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    What is this watered down Elmers trick you speak of sir? I've read about the Plasti-dip, but I've been looking for a less expensive way of sealing the foam for painting.
     
  27. iceman

    iceman Well-Known Member

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    Elmers glue is a form of Polyvinyl acetate, and I have used it in small applications to seal EVA foam. I have not used it on larger projects but it should work fine.
    As to the glue/water ratio you'll probably need to experiment a litlle, but I start with 50/50 mix and adjust from there.
     
  28. Roadkiller

    Roadkiller New Member

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    I use a two part process to seal EVA foam prior to painting.

    First, run your heat gun over the area until it changes colour/texture. You'll know it when you see it, no need to burn it :lol This cuts down on the foam's ability to absorb paint deeply into it.

    Then 'paint' the piece with a mixture of acrylic latex caulk mixed with water. You'll need to experiment with the mixture a bit to get a ratio you are happy with. Acrylic latex caulk is flexible, paintable, and inexpensively available at your local hardware store. I've found 300ml tubes of "Alex" brand here in Canada for $2, which goes a long way in this application.

    This provides a smooth flexible surface. Base coat, paint and weather as normal after that.

    Note: The acrylic caulk, used uncut with water but spread thinly so that it can cure all the way through, is also great to fill seams and cracks in EVA foam work.
     
  29. Darth Pinhead

    Darth Pinhead Active Member

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    Stealth did a great tutorial on sealing and painting foam, which I highly recommend:
    TUTORIAL - Painting Foam Costumes - Part 4 of "Using PEPAKURA for FOAM Costume Building" - YouTube

    I, too, have used the AlexPlus water clean-up caulk found at Home Depot to seal foam and gaps. The problem that I had was that over time it cracked. I used the white version so it it sticks out now. Point being, you may be able to mix in black acrylic paint to tint it so that even if it does crack, it simply looks like battle damage (Especially if you use black foam, which I highly recommend for the same reason).

    As far as adhesives are concerned, WeldWood Contact cement, found at Home Depot, is great, especially for two non-like materials. Personally, I hate hot glue; I always seem to burn myself. A few things I've learned, though:
    1. Do it outside or well-ventilated room and wear a respirator.
    2. Once you have applied it to both parts that are being joined, hit the areas with a hair dryer to speed-cure them to tackiness.
    3. Make SURE you line the pieces up perfectly, because once you've joined them, they are NOT coming apart, lol.
     

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