Doctor's severed hand container from Doctor Who/Torchwood

mummycop

New Member
So I was thinking about what kind of additions I could make to the Jack Harkness costume I'm assembling for Halloween, and I happened to spot this hexagonal tank at a yard sale down the block. It was a dollar, and I thought it might be perfect for a Doctor's hand container. I already had a rubber hand in my props, it might be a bit on the small side, but whatever. What I'd really like to know is if there might be a clear gel I could substitute for the water, so that I could suspend the hand at a certain height, and not worry about spillage.
 

mummycop

New Member
The original prop has a pretty funky handle on the side. I'll probably half-ass it with a barn door handle for now, but if anyone knows what this is, I'd appreciate learning.
 

LastRaven

New Member
I'm sure there are a lot of different types of gels you could use for this and probably some little air bubbles would make it look pretty convincing. Personally, for work (micro-fluidic stuff / devices) I use Sylguard 184 (Amazon), but it's super expensive though it can harden in the oven at 80C for 2 hrs or at room temp. I remember going to Michael's craft superstore and buying some clear stuff that I used as a water substitute...

Could a clear silicone caulking work?

Ohhhh... That reminds me, there is some stuff out there called called acrylic water. It's not the same stuff I used, but could work. Might need a lot of it though, but probably cheaper (and less toxic) than Sylguard. There's other stuff out there that's similar too I imagine.

Edit: you can also dye it with food coloring, so that could present interesting opportunities for your project.
 
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mummycop

New Member
I thought of silicone, but I wasn't sure it would cure or look right, although a few, like Lexel are pretty clear. This tank is probably about a gallon. It's plastic, so baking wouldn't work, but the acrylic water is in the right ballpark.
 

Jeffy

New Member
I have no idea about this kind of stuff, but thinking most simply... Would just run of the mill Jello work maybe? :)
 

Michael Bergeron

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Failing a clear gel solution you could always use clear fishing line to suspend the hand and just use water. That way it would wiggle a bit too making it more realistic. :thumbsup
 

andy19422

Sr Member
I was hoping this prop would be in the Dr Who exhibition in Cardiff to get some good photo's but it isn't :facepalm
 

mummycop

New Member
I was looking at Envirotex pour-on, which is a clear epoxy that's used for thick varnish applications, but I called the manufacturer and they said it wouldn't work because it isn't made to dry under those conditions. I'd have to go an eighth of an inch at a time and microbubbles would form, making a hazy mess.

One other promising avenue is slime, which I've found several tutorials for. like this one:

Slime - How to Make Slime Video

I'm going to do some experiments, but since this is still liquid, the hand will of course move about, and leakage will be an issue. So if that's the case, it might be worth looking at plain old water again, too. If I used water, maybe I could create a system to make it bubble. There's a black box on the back of the tank in the pictures with a tube running out the bottom. I'll bet that's part of how they made theirs bubble, at least when someone was holding it.
 

Daze

New Member
if you go with the bubbling water, what if you suspended the hand from the top with fishing line and weighted it in the bottom with lead weights to keep it from moving around so much? Also, if you wanted the water to be a bit thicker, adding a healthy dose of clear antibacterial hand lotion might help to make bigger and/or slower moving bubbles - and also help to keep the water from going stagnant.
 

hydin

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
BAD idea on the candle gel.

It's highly flammable, plus it will evaporate (meaning gas fumes, meaning ability to burst into flame).

I'd go with acrylic water if you can swing it. The clear hail gel above works ok, but it will evaporate as well. Pretty much anything will since it's a gel, but there's less chance of a fireball from lighting with it.

Chris
 

Daze

New Member
BAD idea on the candle gel.

It's highly flammable, plus it will evaporate (meaning gas fumes, meaning ability to burst into flame).
Wrong.

From Snopes: "The "gel" in gel candles is composed of substances that burn slowly and non-combustively. Akin to the wax of traditional candles, the mysterious substance's purpose is to slowly feed the wick a continuous supply of fuel, thus keeping the candle burning bright for a long time. Even if it were safe to use, a combustive substance would expend itself far too quickly for any candle manufacturer to put it to this use."
 
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