3D Printing

Discussion in 'Marvel Costumes and Props' started by STARLORD13, May 5, 2015.

  1. STARLORD13

    STARLORD13 New Member

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    Does anyone here 3d print their builds like iron man helmets, etc.? If so, what printers do you guys use? Or which is the best to get? Im thinking about getting one to do projects. Please all advice is helpful. :thumbsup :D
     
  2. Kevin Gossett

    Kevin Gossett Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Check out Make Magazine's 3D printer guide for reviews. There isn't really a "best" machine out there for everyone. You have to decide what type of printer works best for you. You need to consider build volume, level of detail, materials used (PLA vs ABS vs resin, etc), cost, usability, etc, etc, etc.
     
  3. Fawbish

    Fawbish Sr Member

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    Also, discard any notions that the printing is simply load up file and walk away. It takes a bit of dedication and understanding to start getting good prints, and it helps to be familiar or start to learn about 3D design in some cases, unless you want to only download previously designed models (which is also fair play). Printing out full helmets etc is a long and laborious process that depending on cost of machine/build area will necessitate splitting the model into multiple printable pieces in certain cases, taking into account support structures within the prints etc. This all affects your post processing time - which of course usually is the key reason people initially think they want a printer for.


    There's no denying you can print out something relatively quickly (<10 hours) that would have taken an age to manufacture by hand, and then paint it and wahey its done. But in reality, the finish wont look good due to build lines, there'll be certain details that you realise arent quite right etc. It still requires a decent amount of post processing. Saying that, its fun to learn and mess around with! I started cheap with a Da Vinci 1.0 (£400/$500 ish), and I'm still enjoying it now.
     
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  4. JJ Griffin

    JJ Griffin Sr Member

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    Pretty vague question... I personally use a Lulzbot Taz 4. "Best" is a very relative term. The "best to get" (for the most part) would be the sort of industrial SLA printers that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, so why don't you let us know what your budget is and we can help suggest models a bit closer to earth? ;)
     
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  5. xeno

    xeno Well-Known Member

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    When buying a 3D printer consider not only accuracy,
    but also speed and ease of changing a nozzle to a different size !

    A lot of printers can do great accuracy but take ages to print larger objects :)
     
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  6. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Well, like stated above, a Lulzbot Taz 4 is nice. The new Taz 5 has a smaller bed, though.

    Makergear M2 is really nice, I'd recommend it for sure. Getting nice pretty prints off of mine.

    I love my Makerbot Replicator 2.............however..................don't buy anything Makerbot makes. All their new stuff is total crap. Read the reviews for yourself, nobody seems to be happy with the new line of printers they came out with.

    And don't forget, it's not just your printer, but the software driving it that makes it awesome. Check out Simplify3d, way better than any of the freeware available.

    Hope it helps.
     
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  7. xeno

    xeno Well-Known Member

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  8. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Also, expect your first few weeks of printing to be hell. Dialing in a printer is no fun at first, but stay the course and don't get discouraged. The second and third time around is a lot easier and faster, dialed in my M2 in about a week.

    My Lulzbot took about 6 months, if not more..................
     
  9. widescreen

    widescreen Well-Known Member

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    I have a Leapfrog Creatr HS and I think it's great - very large print bed, 2 Nozzles (2 colours or materials), large choice of materials (PLA, ABS, PLA, Nylon & exotic materials) & can print very quickly.

    It has been said before - these printers get a lot of getting used to. Each model can behave differently.

    You will get what you pay for though. Don't expect miracles from a £500 kit.

    I know someone with a cheap SLS machine & even though the prints are sharper, the results can differ dramatically.
     
  10. JJ Griffin

    JJ Griffin Sr Member

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    While most of this is true... the bit about the Taz 5's bed is incorrect. Both the Taz 4 and Taz 5 have the exact same build volume, which is 298mm x 275mm x 250mm. The only difference in terms of the bed is that the Taz 5 has a PEI print surface so prints stick better without the aid of adhesion promoters like ABS slurry.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 9, 2018
  11. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    The PEI surface is 100% worth it. We have one on the Mini we have at the hackerspace and I am immediately buying one for my own printers.
     
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  12. Daniel Nelms

    Daniel Nelms Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Also many lower end SLS printers have small build volumes. This will change as time goes on. You do still see build lines on SLS prints so they will require some post finishing work. Also, you will need to seal the prints before attempting to mold them in silicone.

    No matter what machine you get you need to realize that there will be a steep learning curve associated with it, this is a new industry and much like the emergence of the PC market in the late 70s the machines on offer today take a lot of TLC.
     
  13. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Sorry, but you're mistaken. When the Taz 4 first came out, it had the same exact size bed as my Taz 3 has, which is about a foot by a foot and about ten inch build height. Not sure if they've changed that, but I'm certain is was just like mine when the version 4 was introduced. I only lately realized they even had a fifth version, and was disappointed to see the bed size going down. Not sure why they wanted to make it smaller.

    As for the PEI tape, are you talking about PET tape? The green tape? Because that's what they've been coming with standard since the Taz 2 was out.



    EDIT: Is the PEI tape red? Seems this is a new tape surface. Wonder how it compares to PET tape?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 9, 2018
  14. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    PEI is not a typo. I'm not sure if it's really a "tape", you don't replace it often like you do with PET or kapton. You put it on your surface once and you print directly on to it.

    It is without a doubt the best surface I've ever printed on, nothing else compares.
     
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  15. Lord Magneto

    Lord Magneto Well-Known Member

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    Can confirm... makerbot mini owner over here... It actually works really well now but man oh man do I wish I had another printer... will be purchasing an ultimaker or Taz in the next year or so.
     
  16. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Now, I'm wondering if it's made for ABS specifically? I gotta say, I've loved PET tape. I only print in PLA, though, so I couldn't give a comparison to ABS. My favorite thing about it is when the part cools down, it just sort of undoes itself from the print bed, and comes right off.
     
  17. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    I haven't tried printing in PLA, but my understanding is that it sticks to anything. The TAZ 5 and the Mini advertise as printing in PLA so I assume they've tested the PEI surface with it to success. When it cools the material releases.
     
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  18. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Interesting indeed. I'd try it if I wasn't already happy with what I've got. Good to know though. :thumbsup
     
  19. JJ Griffin

    JJ Griffin Sr Member

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    No, I am not mistaken. The Taz 4 and the Taz 5 have the exact same print bed size and build volume. I am not sure where you heard it had changed. It's well documented in lots of different places so I can screenshot the specifications for you if you're really convinced they're different sizes.
     
  20. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    No, no. I believe you are right. I've not found a shred of proof that my claim was correct.

    But man, I swear when it came out the specs were the same as the previous version. Oh well, glad I got my version 3. ;)
     
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  21. drumguy560

    drumguy560 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Just don't make the same mistake I did and start out with a RepRap! Boy it prints great once you really get to know it, but it suuuuuuuuure takes a while!
     
  22. dlowrider

    dlowrider Well-Known Member

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    Fortus 250 mc
     
  23. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    I'm sorry you feel that way. I completely disagree. I'll try to limit this from being a huge rant about 3D printing and experimental technology since I am pretty passionate about the tech behind 3D printing, but...

    If it weren't for the RepRap project then none of us would have 3D printers. I feel like there is merit in having to build your printer from parts, having to tune and upload your own firmware, and having to spend time dialing in every nut and bolt - physical ones as well as metaphorical ones. These machines are not without flaws, every single 3D printer out there will require some level of maintenance and experience some level of failure. Even your regular 2D paper printer has problems, and that technology has been around for decades. The difference between being able to solve your own problems, and calling a printer a "piece of junk" because it doesn't work right away out of the box, is how familiar you are with the technology itself.

    If anyone is interested in 3D printing in general, I absolutely have to recommend buying a kit printer and building it yourself. You will have a much greater understanding of the mechanics and the concepts of the machine than if you bought one to "just plug it in and it works", which is important when it inevitably has a problem. It's the difference between being able to understand why something is going wrong and being able to fix it, and having to ship your printer out to the manufacturer and have them repair it and spend weeks waiting to be back printing again.

    I have 3 printers - one is a MendelMax which was a kit, and 2 which I completely designed and built from scratch that are based on the Prusa i3. When something goes wrong - and it always does - I have the knowledge of the machines to be able to troubleshoot it very quickly and get myself back in the game. At the hackerspace I work out of, we have 3 printers and one time someone came up to me to ask what the issue was with their prints not coming out right. I was able to identify the problem after watching it print for about 30 seconds because I understand the way the machine works.

    Now I will again admit that I am a hobbyist in the 3D printing field, and that I love the tech behind them and I want to be familiar with the workings of the machine. And I realize that not everyone will feel that way, some people just want to print things and that's fine. But I feel like you are discounting a really great lesson of building a RepRap by saying it's a mistake. I guarantee you know more about 3D printers than most people having built and dialed in yours, than someone who buys a Makerbot or an Ultimaker or a Makergear and doesn't know how to fix the simplest of problems or understand why some prints are having failures. You're better off having had the experience.
     
  24. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You may want to slightly consider the fact that not everyone in the world may be mechanically inclined to do so. Plenty of people need to hire someone to fix that paper printer sometimes, right? We buy cars, yet not everybody is an auto mechanic.

    Don't get me wrong, I get what your saying, just adding some food for though. Some people would likely prefer something more of a "push button" printer, and that's okay if they do. ;) Different strokes for different folks.
     
  25. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    You're totally right, and I didn't mean to suggest that there isn't a place for "just press go" type printers. I feel like in general the technology really isn't there yet, and that those type of printers have the same issues that kit or hobby printers have, and usually the difference is you *can't* perform repairs on them. Either because the machine is locked down, or you would void your warranty, or you'll break something even worse.

    Or to put it another way: If you buy a printer that you want to take out of the box and be ready to print in 20 minutes, be aware that might not always work and it's not because the printer you bought sucks. It's because the technology is still very experimental.

    On that note, I've been using the LulzBot Mini at our space and it's probably totally changed my mind about what consumer grade printers can do. We've had it for about a month and maybe 30 people have used it, and so far it's not had a single problem at all. Between the self leveling bed and the PEI surface, it's pretty foolproof. We literally had it out of the box and printing in under 20 minutes.
     
  26. GhostMinion

    GhostMinion Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Good point. My Makerbot is a pain in the * to work on. Yet, it was printing out of the box in like 15 minutes or something. I was blown away. Total pain replacing a simple roller bearing, though. More of a pain than it should be.


    Lulzbot and the Makergear on the other hand, WAAAAAY easier to work on, simple really. More of what I would consider an engineer's printer, though, not so much a push button and go printer for sure. People need to understand how to "talk" to the printer through the slicing software, which is MEGA confusing at first.

    For what it's worth, though, I feel you have more control of your actual printing with the "engineer's robot".
     
  27. drumguy560

    drumguy560 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    msleeper

    Couldn't agree more that there is certainly value in having hands on experience with one of these things. My Mendel has taught me so much about 3d printing, to the point that I'm going to try to design and build my own soon. That being said though, now that I know what I know, I would like to have a more well put together machine, maybe one without wires and kapton everywhere haha.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018

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