WARNING FOR SINTRA USERS

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by spcglider@aol.com, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. spcglider@aol.com

    spcglider@aol.com Sr Member

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    Hey folks,

    I just picked up the news that SINTRA, the foamed PVC board that alot of folks use for making props, contains LEAD as a stabilizer.

    Yes, that's right. Lead. As in that stuff that makes deformed babies and gets you ill.

    As far as I know right now, Sintra dust is not of concern, but the FUMES from burning or heat-cutting Sintra may be much more dangerous than previously thought.

    I will post more if I find out anything else.

    -Gordon
     
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  2. TK171

    TK171 Well-Known Member

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    Arrggg.. Bobs a gonner. :lol

    Does Bob know about this? I know he like to use Sintra to work on things..
     
  3. wynnstudio

    wynnstudio Active Member

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    also laser cutting and I assume other high heat methods releases the chloride in it. Mixed with the water vapor in the air and you get chlorine gas.

    FUN

    Thomas
     
  4. Great_Bizarro

    Great_Bizarro Sr Member

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    * Sintra crack pipes gonna kill everyone :D Be sure and get the MSD sheets on everything you might burn or sand. There is a lot of stuff that if it doesn't kill you it can cause other problems. Now where are my asbestos gloves I got some sintra burning in the oven :rolleyes
     
  5. foxbatkllr

    foxbatkllr Sr Member

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    Well, I guess I better wear a mask from now on...
     
  6. spcglider@aol.com

    spcglider@aol.com Sr Member

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    <div class='quotetop'>(foxbatkllr @ Jun 13 2006, 07:58 PM) [snapback]1261202[/snapback]</div>
    Yeah, I just have one stitched to my head now. My wife hasn't seen my real face for what... six years?


    Just kidding.


    Maybe.


    -G
     
  7. YenChih Lin

    YenChih Lin Sr Member

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    Lead can cause nervous damage, headaches, joints pain and dementia, motoric dysfunction due to long term accumulation. It can be found within the bones and internal organs like liver and kidneys and can't be easily depleted by the body. An acute toxication can be treated with EDTA or Penicillamin.
     
  8. Darth Kahnt

    Darth Kahnt Sr Member

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    <div class='quotetop'>(spcglider@aol.com @ Jun 13 2006, 05:31 PM) [snapback]1261247[/snapback]</div>
    Yeah, I just have one stitched to my head now. My wife hasn't seen my real face for what... six years?


    Just kidding.


    Maybe.


    -G
    [/b][/quote]

    :lol

    A lot of women would prefer it to be that way in reality... :lol
     
  9. Tambo Fett

    Tambo Fett Well-Known Member

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    Great news.....I guess I can take a few more years off my life.
     
  10. PHArchivist

    PHArchivist Master Member

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  11. TheSt.LouisKid

    TheSt.LouisKid Sr Member

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    I love the stuff.

    And that would explain why I just pooped out my liver and one kidney the other day. :eek

    All kidding aside thanks for letting us know and everyone please take the proper steps to protect yourselves.
     
  12. Fizbin

    Fizbin Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, so tell me what DOESN'T kill you in one way or another these days. :unsure
     
  13. Beagle Bill

    Beagle Bill Well-Known Member

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    :angry This sucks. Government says you can't use lead in paint, yet it's perfectly fine to add to building materials?.? WTF? Thanks for alerting us to this. I've been using Sintra for a couple of years. Gotta stop using Sintra before I get dain bramage. :eek:

    Bill
     
  14. DL 44 Blaster

    DL 44 Blaster Sr Member

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    Interesting stuff....thanks for the info. :thumbsup
     
  15. Scotophor

    Scotophor Active Member

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    Lead was removed from paint decades ago because children will often eat flakes of peeling paint. Many other products (especially plastics) still use lead oxide as a color enhancer; it makes colors brighter and less transparent. Paint makers have generally replaced lead oxide with other metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide (which works better than lead anyway). Lead was used in ancient Rome to sweeten wine... many historians believe the fall of the Roman Empire can be at least partly attributed to lead poisoning.

    Electrical wiring insulation is one example: teachers sometimes use electrical wire for student craft projects due to its easy formability and bright color, but of course this should be discouraged... just handling it (let alone chewing on it) presents a hazard.
     
  16. Soulinertia

    Soulinertia Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    But only gives you cancer in the state of California right?
     
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  17. Teddz

    Teddz Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I remember seeing my grandfather one day in his cabinet shop in a fog of lacquer he had applied... no mask, just a slice of pizza in his hand then a cigarette. Lung cancer got him when he was 85. Smoked from 12 years of age. Personally, I think he wanted to go. He was a carpenter all his life, my grandmother was really harsh with him, then around his late 70's his arthritis was bad and he couldn't even hold a hammer anymore. That destroyed him. It was a downward spiral from then.
     
  18. nomuse

    nomuse Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Maybe I'm just a born pessimist, but making it to 85 -- and being able to build with my hands until 70 -- sounds to me like a nice goal.

    I inhaled a few too many chemicals in my earlier years to be that confident, though (especially working in poorly ventilated warehouse spaces building massive set-pieces for trade shows).
     
  19. msleeper

    msleeper Sr Member

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    Burning Sintra may not be safe, but bumping an 8 year old thread gave me cancer.
     
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  20. joberg

    joberg Master Member

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    Yep, you gotta wake up the zombies from time to time:rolleyes
     
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  21. Robiwon

    Robiwon Master Member Gone but not forgotten.

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    Is 8 years a record? Must be pretty close....

    But, hey, it never hurts to remind people of potential health issues with products that a lot of us all the time.
     
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  22. Scotophor

    Scotophor Active Member

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    Was there a post above mine #15 that was deleted? I honestly can't think of how I could have come across a thread so old unless someone else already bumped it up.

    Anyway, if it is my fault, I apologize... I'm usually careful about not resurrecting the ancient dead.
     
  23. Mclabop

    Mclabop Active Member

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    Does anyone have a source for sintra containing lead oxide? Because I'm not seeing a source/reference, either on here or via the google making machine.
     
  24. Gordon Gekko

    Gordon Gekko Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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  25. Bioshutt

    Bioshutt Active Member

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    And this is why I use a respirator when I work with it and usually work with Steel and Aluminium instead of Sintra
     
  26. OldSkoolEffects

    OldSkoolEffects Well-Known Member

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    You do realize that on an MSDS, "prolonged exposure" is working with it for hours a day for years. I'm all for PPE, but "omg, it has lead, so it's so dangerous!" is a little bit of fear-mongering. The reality is that you probably get more heavy metals from the fish you eat and the water you drink over a lifetime than what the average person would working with Sintra. And again, as long as you don't let it start to decompose from heat, and aren't snorting the dust from it, you don't have anything to worry about.
     
  27. Gordon Gekko

    Gordon Gekko Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    If you think posting an MSDS that shows the lead content after someone asked for the info is "fear mongering" that's your issue.
     
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  28. kristen jones

    kristen jones Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Well there are ways to avoid the dangers when working with it. For example, you can boil it to heat and mold it instead of using a heat gun (this is how I do it) and you can wear a dust mask when sanding. Also, you can cut it with an X-Acto blade instead of heat cutting it.


    It's not as if touching a piece of Sintra is going to expose you to a lethal dose, for Heaven sake. We really ought to keep things in perspective here. Most of us are not cutting, heating and sanding Sintra for hours at a time every single day of our waking lives. We work with it here and there for this project or that. Once the cutting/molding/sanding is complete, we move on. There isn't enough "prolonged exposure" to constitute a real danger, and if one tries a few of the alternate methods I've mentioned you can cut the risk down even more.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2014
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  29. Scotophor

    Scotophor Active Member

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    Thanks for the MSDS link... and wow. It looks like lead is almost the LEAST worrisome of its toxic ingredients. Also, either someone is really bad at math or the .pdf file was made by OCR'ing a printed document without quality checking and editing. The percentages of the various ingredients add up to way over 100% unless you regard the "<" less-than symbol as usually meaning "much, much less than". I believe the OCR explanation is most likely; I think "< 3.0%" is much more likely for the antimony trioxide than the "< 30%" shown.
     
  30. OldSkoolEffects

    OldSkoolEffects Well-Known Member

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    To put MSDS sheets in perspective, there's one for Dihydrogen Monoxide that could be just as hazardous as Sintra if you don't follow their exposure recommendations.
     
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  31. Scotophor

    Scotophor Active Member

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    DHMO should be banned everywhere!

    ;)
     
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  32. cunningham

    cunningham Active Member

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    Is this Sintra stuff even available in Canada? I hear so much about it but have never actually seen it for sale here.
     
  33. Kouri

    Kouri New Member

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  34. Mclabop

    Mclabop Active Member

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  35. jarvis

    jarvis Sr Member

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    Of course a little Sintra cutting isn't going to kill you but, if you build things for a hobby or a living there are multiple things you're going to be exposed to on a daily basis that you shouldn't be breathing, and it adds up. Several times I have heard of people in this as a hobby or that do related activities for a living getting cancer or some other pulmonary problem and saying, "I should have worn that respirator more." That alone has been enough to make me to stop, make sure my work area is well ventilated and put on protective equipment.
    [​IMG]
     

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