UK Law - buying a replica/screen used gun

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Cave_Troll

Active Member
It's pretty simple.
If it could be mistaken for a genuine firearm by a reasonable member of the public, then it's illegal to sell it to someone who is not over 18 and a member of a legitimate, insured, Airsoft skirmish site, re-enactment society or theatre/production company.
It's also illegal to import, or manufacture such an item by either assembling parts, or spraying a 2-tone/clear I.F. in realistic colours.
Thanks for that. My confusion can be highlighted by these items below. I can buy this:

Lara Crofts (Angelina Jolie) Stunt P11 Gadget Gun

but not this:

Blade (Wesley Snipes) Stunt Pistol

Does one look any more/less realistic than the other?
 

abaddon1974

Active Member
I would not sell either to anyone without checking their credentials.
I am still not sure where the NARES thing comes from though, that is nothing to do with UK law at all.

NARES tried to corner the UK re-enactment firearms market a few years ago, failed because they are unneccessary and now have a handful of re-enactment groups and one James Bond group as their members.

Without reading the act I seem to recall that a re-enactment group is defined as such by having insurance.

But by having the NARES stipulation even if you are in a proper registered and insured group you could not buy the props.

Strange.
 

NormanF

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I love how laws have stupid names that sometimes have no relation to what they actually do. I mean, how "violent" can the crime be if you use a plastic or rubber firearm reproduction?
 

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Eagle

Sr Member
I love how laws have stupid names that sometimes have no relation to what they actually do. I mean, how "violent" can the crime be if you use a plastic or rubber firearm reproduction?
The VCRA had wider-reaching implications that just replica guns. The prop and airsoft market just got caught up in it.
 

Scapey

Sr Member
The law is absurd.

And no, neither of those guns could be sold to someone without a "specific defense". as it's called. And yes, it's stupidly ironic that if either were a de-activated REAL gun... You COULD buy them simply by being over 18.


It's NOT a licence - It's the same as boxing. TECHNICALLY, you're comitting assault when you box, but you won't be charged with it because there's a specific defense in place to allow that level of assault under those controlled conditions.

TECHNICALLY, you may mot manufacture a RIF, but if you can prove that you're a legitimate skirmisher/re-enactor then you won't be charged either.
 

Eagle

Sr Member
The law is absurd.
Absolutely. :)

TECHNICALLY, you may mot manufacture a RIF, but if you can prove that you're a legitimate skirmisher/re-enactor then you won't be charged either.
You can still be charged and taken to court as it's still illegal to manufacture even if you're a skirmisher/re-enactor etc etc. The 'defence' gives you just that; a defence which you can use in a court of law if charged. In reality, the Police or CPS should realise you'd get off with the charge and so wouldn't waste time sending you to court.

:)
 

NormanF

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
So if I'm a firearm manufacturer, instead of scrapping defects I should deactivate it and sell it regular or higher price for display purposes?
 

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abaddon1974

Active Member
It depends what the firearm is of course, a lot with defects would be scrap value if de-activated, but some historic guns are worth more de-activated than live firing.
Of course guns covered as section 5 prohibited weapons are not usually available live and most people will never own a live one at all so you can only really obtain them de-activated.

Craig
 

Atlanthia

Sr Member
@ Scapey:

So if, after reading ALL of this (I have to say) fascinating thread, if I go out into my shed and make a screen accurate E11 Stormtrooper Blaster and spray it all up black etc. or a bang on copy of Ripley's flame thrower machine gun from Aliens, purely for display in my home in a locked cabinet, I am liable to be prosecuted? Have I fully understood what the ridiculous state of the law is in the U.K. at present, or am I a thicky that has totally missed the point here? :lol
 

terminator68

Active Member
After reading all the comments on this topic, i cant understand how i was able to import from the US, a fully painted solid resin colt 1911. Which i checed with customs house and the fire arms licenseing, both told me the same thing. I was able to import because it was made off solid resin and didn't have any moving parts.
 

Bobtherocker

Well-Known Member
After reading all the comments on this topic, i cant understand how i was able to import from the US, a fully painted solid resin colt 1911. Which i checed with customs house and the fire arms licenseing, both told me the same thing. I was able to import because it was made off solid resin and didn't have any moving parts.
The trouble is, nobody is really sure how to enforce this silly act.
It's a lottery with the customs guys. Evidently, judging from a previous post about a so called police expert saying it's okay to own a replica as long as it stays at home the police aren't too sure either.

At a UKGarrison event a few years ago one of my stormtrooper buddies had a resin MG-34 and along came a pair of armed policemen who took an interest in it.
All they wanted to do was hold it and get a photo. The funny thing is one of them handed over his real firearm to the stormtrooper to hold while the photo was taken.

I'm pretty sure the act is there purely for the numpties that hold up banks with plastic toy guns and the collectors will be left alone.
 

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NormanF

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I'm pretty sure the act is there purely for the numpties that hold up banks with plastic toy guns and the collectors will be left alone.
Sounds like a law here in Florida: You get a minimum sentence of ten years if you have a firearm while you are committing a crime. Twenty if you shoot it.
 

Eagle

Sr Member
Sounds like a law here in Florida: You get a minimum sentence of ten years if you have a firearm while you are committing a crime. Twenty if you shoot it.
It's actually a poorly thought out law as far as guns are concerned - a lot of airsoft replicas these days cost twice / three times the price of an under the counter real shooter or even a deac so why would Mr Crim even bother?
 

Scapey

Sr Member
@ Scapey:

So if, after reading ALL of this (I have to say) fascinating thread, if I go out into my shed and make a screen accurate E11 Stormtrooper Blaster and spray it all up black etc. or a bang on copy of Ripley's flame thrower machine gun from Aliens, purely for display in my home in a locked cabinet, I am liable to be prosecuted? Have I fully understood what the ridiculous state of the law is in the U.K. at present, or am I a thicky that has totally missed the point here? :lol
By the letter of the law - You are correct. You've just commited a criminal act by manufacturing a Realistic Imitation Firearm.

Bobtherocker - Were you there for this incident?
 

ReproMan

Well-Known Member
heres another vote for a uk rpf re enactment society. would help everyone in uk but logistics would be a nightmare me thinks
 

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