The end of Hollywood?

Discussion in 'Entertainment and Movie Talk' started by Commander Max, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    I keep thinking about this, although I don't think Hollywood will disappear entirely. There are such changes going on, the way movies are produced and distributed are very much a thing of the past. I'm looking forward to the day when these changes take hold in a big way. It will make the time after SW came out look like nothing happened.

    Other areas of entertainment have faced the same thing. Namely the hobby most of us enjoy, I remember a time when the only place to see the underground of sci-fi props was the cons. You paid $25-35 bucks a day, and went straight to the dealers room. At least that's what I did.
    Today I have no idea about any cons going on anywhere, expect in Comic Con(in SD Calf.) and Wonderfest. Both of which I will never attend. Mainly because it would be more of a hassle, and I get any product I'm looking for here, e-bay or contact a friend and make a trade.

    Now to bring this back around I look at Hollywood the same way. Why go to a theater and pay to see something that really doesn't appeal to me. When I have access to what I will enjoy watching, and have the freedom to get up and go the bathroom(without missing anything). Of course there is the rest of the issues with movie theaters. Why go I can get a world of entertainment without ever leaving the sofa. Of course I miss out on the theater experience, but I can recreate that as well.

    Now here is the thing that is really going to effect the future of entertainment. I ask a friend of mine(a lot of you know Steve Neil), about this subject not only did he agree. But he told me how you could do it.
    Go get yourself a really good 1080p camera(he even said the make and model) really good lighting rigs, some really good computers and of course software. The unbelievable part was the the price about $1000 for the camera plus another $1000 for the lighting, so the computers and software are going to be the biggest expense. I'm sure that can even be brought down.
    Why would you need millions of dollars and all sorts of other things when all you need is a garage, and a lot of gumption.

    You don't even need a good idea for a film, just go have fun. But this is what gets me thinking, there are a lot of guys out there who had a career in Hollywood, or did all of the schooling but didn't get anywhere. Those with the dream of making it in entertainment now have a very solid chance. Even those working in Hollywood have a chance to do original stuff, without any studio interference. Or offer their services to those who want to make their own stuff.

    There really is a huge opportunity here, I can't wait to see it.

    What do you guys think?
     
  2. dbuck

    dbuck Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You can make the best indie film ever.
    You can write the best novel ever.

    But without distribution........

    I walked through Target's book section this morning. They have the usual suspects, all 'top ten' authors. And pretty much nothing else.
    Go to Amazon. Any idiot can upload a kindle book (I've done it) but it sure is hard to discover new talent because the publishers focus on the names that can sell several hundred thousand copies.
    Million Dolllar Baby, even with names like Clint Eastwood and Morgan Freeman, or Gran Torino made money, but did it so slowly I believe they may be the slowest films to reach one hundred million in box office ever. They now focus on the quick buck, get a few hundred million out of Michael Bay's latest explosion fest before people figure out how bad it really is.

    But on the other hand, I've seen a few of these low budget indie art films with fantastic reviews.....and they suck. Do they get reviewed that way simply because the big studio didn't make it? Hmm.
     
  3. alienscollection.com

    alienscollection.com Master Member

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  4. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    I guess when you put ZERO stock in anyone else's review of a movie like I do, none of this even matters. It's great not to be a TV/Movie advertising zombie.

    ....and every generation claims the end of Hollywood is coming.

    Not gonna happen.

    Someday some of you will realize that it is YOU that has changed. Hollywood keeps shooting for the same age group and I am sorry to say you aren't in that group anymore.

    You need to adapt, or you will rarely like any modern movies.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012
  5. Art Andrews

    Art Andrews Community Owner Community Staff

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    That was a FASCINATING read! Need to think about it a bit to decide how I feel about it, but my initial thought is to look at this like I look at a number of industries that have fallen. If you refuse to budge and refuse to change with the times, sooner or later, someone will come along and replace you. There was a time when unions served a purpose, but they have become very greedy and bloated and refuse to change... and one by one, they have eventually become antiquated and have been replaced, all because people refused to budge and refused to change with the times. That is what seems to be happening here.

    Having been in those shoes, I'd be very interested to hear your thoughts on this, Willie.
     
  6. Kerr Avon

    Kerr Avon Master Member

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    Hollywood is effectively dead though what you may mean is professional production being dead. A lot of movies and television shows are being made in Canada, New Zealand, Europe etc instead of Hollywood because they priced themselves out of the competition. Sure, some will always be made there, but it's not the powerhouse it used to be. But with the further development of internet distribution, home computers powerful enough to do CGI work, and high quality cameras available, sure, anyone can make a film as long as they have good ideas and at least some amount to invest in it.
     
  7. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    Thanks alienscollection.com for posting that. Like Art I find it just as interesting.

    The only thing I don't think will survive is the traditional channel idea. If Netflix and other streaming services are any indication. A channel having a broadcast schedule will be another thing of the past. I remember reading somewhere that the Nelson rating system was having trouble because of TIVO. People were watching shows at their leisure instead of when the shows were broadcast.

    From some other articles I have read on this subject(which got me thinking about this in the first place). Say that some of the studios are resisting streaming. Telling companies like Netflix they can't even put the title in the Queue selection before the release date. Plus they delay the availability of titles to rental services. To give people a chance to buy the disks, before they can rent them(which doesn't make a lot of sense to me).

    Change is the only constant, but how many of us ever thought we would see the end of newspapers, and magazines. Much less vinyl records, cassette tapes, even cd's. But the music is still there. Which is part of the point, an end to Hollywood means they are loosing their dominance. Part of the proof is the diminishing audience for their product(theater attendance is dropping, it's been dropping for over a decade). But not people's craving to be entertained. Hollywood has to face a great deal of competition, in some cases they can work with it(like video games). But they have to compete for time in places like social media and the net in general.

    Once the streaming system establishes itself(it's still very new), distribution of independent shows will only grow and cost fractions of what anything Hollywood puts out. I'll bet it will get to the point where it will cost next to nothing to put a show on a streaming network, just like Youtube(if not Youtube itself).
     
  8. robstyle

    robstyle Master Member

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    "Hollywood" died in the early 80's when the big corporations thought they could run and market films as they did with Coke and McDonalds. In the 90's everyone got greedy and LA quite literally chased the industry away. Everyone wanted money for everything to the point it was cheaper to take it anywhere but here. Louisiana was the hot spot for sometime now they are too feeling the greed as incentives are dropping like flies.

    "Films" are not regularly made anymore. Instead its all formula driven, marketing based, butter churned stories with plot's that are paper thin with a $40 to $200+ million dollar budget attached. Its crazy when an actor gets millions to do a movie and its flushed out, dull or just eye gougingly bad. This is a main factor in ticket prices being what they are. No longer are a night or weekend at the movies anywhere near affordable for a family or a teenager on a date. Your at the $50 mark just for two tickets, two drinks and a popcorn...

    I can go on and on about how things have changed from "I have everything minus the camera and sound" to "I have camera and sound yet I know nothing of what it takes to make a movie" with the indie scene.

    Those who think the movie industry is invincible and will succeed are somewhere off in make believe land. The music industry imploded, the automotive industry near died, the US and other countries economies are down, audience attendance is way down yet ticket prices keep rising to offset the financial gains. Why would anyone pay to see movies that are just rehashed, repackaged and regurgitated? Sheeple seem to be the only ones out there still being * in the seats for the mindless dribble. Its the type of stuff that makes people believe movies like "Drive" are original, a masterpiece, best film of the year... It may in fact be compared to its competition and thats whats wrong with the industry and why its destined to fail.
     
  9. Kerr Avon

    Kerr Avon Master Member

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    I fully agree with this. Roku and devices like it are the future, everything on demand, no regular broadcast schedule. I've cancelled my cable television at this point and am just going with Netflix and Hulu Plus right now with some Roku devices. **** the cable companies.
     
  10. Flecktarn92

    Flecktarn92 Active Member

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    I completely agree, the chances of getting noticed are a lot better these days if one were to put their nose to the grindstone and become organized. I got myself a Canon T3I DSLR, A 10 ft x 10 ft green screen with lighting kits, an external sound recorder, and final cut pro. The possibilities are endless.
     
  11. Wes R

    Wes R Legendary Member

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    I think a new age of small independent film makers will be coming about. At some point a distribution system will be in place to help the films get out there. We'll see good and bad just like we did back in the late 60s and 70s when the small film makers popped up. To be honest anymore I'd rather watch a Roger Corman movie than anything from a big studio.
     
  12. robstyle

    robstyle Master Member

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    The issue again comes down to quality when dealing with the home made indie product. Its a needle in a universe of haystacks finding that one product that is presentable. Then you have the "system" holding those people back. Industry people fear change on all levels of the food chain. The moment someone gets in and changes on thing or thinks outside the box, that person is either looked down upon or becomes a massive success. Not often is it anywhere in between.
     
  13. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    I think it's already here. All you would need to do is make a site and have the video available for download or use one of the video services(like Youtube?).

    I do think there will be services to help host films. Once people realize there is a market for it. Right now people will have to do the marketing work themselves, I don't think that it would be all that hard. But the audience will be small.

    I was watching the original Land of the Lost, I kept thinking a show on that level would not be all that difficult today. With today's technology it certainly would look better.

    I think this sort of thing is negated in the current climate, because people have a very different idea of what is presentable.

    I think this stuff is just going to seem to come out of nowhere, but has been going on all along. I can't help but think of the Plinket reviews. Regardless of what you would think of them, they are independent productions in their own right.
    I remember a bunch projects around 2000 where people were making their own crossover sci-fi battles by mixing a bunch of sci-fi ships. Most were horrible but a few were done well. These projects were done on what are now antiquated computers.

    The system is going to resist no matter what. It's like when home schooling and charter schools were becoming popular. The teachers unions resisted as much as they could, because they didn't want to face change/competition. Eventually pros in the industry are going to find greener pastures. Because eating is a lot more important than union membership/loyalty. If there are a bunch of independent filmmakers, there is a market for teaching as well as consulting to these projects(much less books, websites, webinars). That would pay far better than any Hollywood project.
     
  14. CB2001

    CB2001 Master Member

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    Here's my two cents. This is based on my opinion. And if you don't want to hear it, then I recommend you bypass this one:

    There are two reasons why Hollywood is dying, and is on the verge of being dead. The two is as followed:
    1. Failure to adapt: One of my teachers back at Full Sail told us a story once with a moral. This story involved a casting director who had been in the industry for over 30 years. When he met her, he noticed she still used a Polaroid camera, despite the fact that the film was no longer available for it. She was opposed to using digital cameras, especially when they first came out. Until he showed her the newer digital cameras and how easy it was to take the picture, to view them and how easy it was to save them in comparison to Polaroid snaps. After that, she bought herself a digital camera to use, realizing how much money she wasted on buying the stock for the Polaroid camera when she could have gotten it much sooner and saved a lot of money. Moral: If you don't adapt, you lose more in the long run. The drawback is that there are a lot more people in the film industry who are stubborn and refuse to change with current trends in technology.

    2. Crap In, Crap Out: This is a quote from one of my instructors named Jose, who is an independent producer who recently released a movie and he is one of the people responsible for the Naked Filmmaker YouTube channel. When talking about Film Director Influences, he explains that "If you go and watch only the most recent, explosion filled action film and that's all you have, I mean, you don't have a whole lot to play with here. Crap in, crap out. I'm not saying that all action films are crap, but most are. Let's be honest. Go out and explore." The fact is that most film directors nowadays are more concerned with making movies "that look cool." In fact, this is a true story, I was the assistant to the art director for a 35mm short film that sort of mimicked the thriller style of Halloween and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The two guys that written the script were selected as the directors for the project. When our teacher, who was also our producer, asked them, "What is the motivation behind the killers' actions? Why are they doing what they are doing?" They're answer: "Because it's in the script." And to make matters worse, Hollywood is accepting films that are utter crap because it's like a Big Mac: it's fast to cook and easy to sell. And if its a film that remotely works, they'll end up taking it and watering it down to appeal to what they consider is the mindless audience (a good example is the prequel to John Carpenter's The Thing, which we all know that they not only replaced all of the sequences that involved practical effects with complete CG creatures because Universal thought "it didn't look modern enough", but the fact that the writer confirmed that Universal cut out a lot of the scenes which would have made the audience care about the characters in the same manner as Carpenter did). The whole system of Hollywood is nowadays more concerned about making a quick buck that they're making films that allows them to live "paycheck to paycheck, week by week" (so to speak), instead of making a product that not only appeals to the audience, but can continue to make revenue back for them after its left the theater and has reached DVD/Blu-Ray, and even with Internet distribution that could draw interest in your movie (especially if its a good and solid one).

    The only filmmaker I can think of that has distributed an entire motion picture onto the Internet is Sebastián Gutiérrez and his film Girl Walks Into a Bar, for free. Not exactly the greatest film, but its better than most of the recent slapstick stuff released by Hollywood. In fact, when it was originally available in the YouTube Screening Room, it got over 1 million views (this was before YouTube Screening Room discontinued showing it and the production company itself continued to show it on YouTube on their own channel, getting an additional 632,837 views. Though the film was intended for view on an international release, but its been blocked in the UK, Canada and the rest of the world and is only available to view in the U.S. right now. Granted, you have to sit through commercials, the commercials are brief and you still have a full movie to watch.

    But the big issue is the lack of story. Basically, Hollywood has come to another point in history where its been before. It's doing nothing but "studio films", like it did in the 1960s. What the current studio system needs, as I've said before, is a second Counter-Culture movement, and the studios need to start trusting in the filmmakers to tell the stories they come up with the way they want to, because they know deep down it'll work their way, and not the way that a bunch of suits think it will.

    But the big reason why that Hollywood isn't willing to accept it is as Freddie Wong explains it best to someone who asks about it at a pizza party here in this video (start at 2:20, end at 3:15): http://youtu.be/5LmbP8uEGBM
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2012
  15. Funky

    Funky Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This is OT but it seemed like the place to post this.
    I've always loved going to the movies for that theater experience. For the majority of my life, if two weeks went by and I didn't go to a movie it was unusual.
    That's pretty much gone for me now. I go to maybe 7 movies a year if that. I mean, why bother? I own a 50" flatscreen, blu ray, climate control, surround sound, all the food I want, pause for potty breaks, a very comfortable sofa, I can watch a movie in my boxers and for the cost of my movie going experience I can OWN the movie in six months. And despite what Mic thinks, I DO listen to reviews as I usually agree with them (I'm no sheep, but there is a REASON it gets bad reviews) so it gives me an opportunity to see if I should buy it or not.
    I just haven't found any real reason to spend a small fortune for the wife and I to go to the movies for the "experience" when my home experience is much more enjoyable. :unsure
     
  16. Dave Porter

    Dave Porter Sr Member

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    I'm the same as Funky. Nice large screen, nice place to watch from. I'm over 6', so for many years, I was crammed into seats too small for me.

    Now, I have all I need at home, and with the distribution being what it is, the availability of newer movies has been halved or even quartered.

    The last film I saw in the theatre was Toy Story 3, with my kids.

    Before that? Iron Man 2 I think.

    I have been out to the movies less than 6 times in the last few years.

    And when I do see the next 'big blockbuster' I generally am 'meh' about it.

    Definitely a change from from teen years, where I was out every weekend, so see new movies.

    My $.02 worth on this.
     
  17. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    This is timely.
    AMC Entertainment Ends 2011 With A Thud - Deadline.com

    Ouch!

    Funky Jedi your post is very much on topic.

    Theaters were a piece of Hollywood, they were the windows into that fantasy world. The only place where you could see all of the neat stuff they put out.

    Theaters were once attractions unto themselves.

    Now theaters are the place to see a film first, then it's on to video.
     
  18. MFP 2020

    MFP 2020 Sr Member

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    Ironic, perhaps, that the home theater experience is exactly what ruined the theater theater experience. Or, more precisely, people used to watching movies at home. My wife is one of those "Let's go see the newest, most popular movie on the busiest night at the busiest time" people. I loathe the general moviegoing public because they act like they're at home watching TV.

    I prefer to see movies on special occasions with like-minded people, like seeing "Raiders of the Lost Ark" or "Mad Max" at the Egyptian with a group of people who are there to see those movies, and not because they had nothing else to do or it's the new Michael Bay actionganza or whatever. For me that's a rewarding communal experience. Otherwise, yeah, I'll watch it at home.

    But I suppose that speaks also to mic's point about age: the big Hollow-wood movies are aimed at that teenage boy demographic and I'm no longer in it.
     
  19. rodneyfaile

    rodneyfaile Sr Member

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    Very true!
     
  20. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    I never heard anybody in my generation say that(I'm in my mid 40's).
    We grew up on the entertainment machine, it appeared as solid as death and taxes.

    I never said Hollywood will go away, only that it will have a much smaller market share.

    Besides who would have ever thought newspapers becoming irrelevant.
     
  21. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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  22. PantheraGem

    PantheraGem Sr Member

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    Going to see "Avengers" tomorrow. It will be only the second time at the theater this year. I used to go a few times a month. Now my friends and I gather at my house to watch movies and we enjoy it a lot more. Sony projector with 110" screen and 7.1 surround, and recently, a popcorn popper! It's way sexier, and a whole lot cheaper to watch movies at home these days once the initial investment is over. I'd rather be disappointed by a recent Hollywood movie and spend $3.99 for an instant streaming movie via Amazon than by the $30 (gas is expensive) it winds up costing by the time I'm done being disappointed at the theater.

    Also, I have to drive an hour to a theater that actually has audiences that aren't talking the whole time or annoying you with a cell phone. The days of going to a theater being a special experience are gone. To audiences, it's as ho-hum as the architecture of the "auditorium" they're sitting in.

    All Hollywood has to do is look to the music industry to see the sort of changes that are coming. It's bad for everyone, good for everyone, and one thing's for sure, it's definitely different for everyone.
     
  23. benhs1898

    benhs1898 Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Really good points. These younger crowds (even some of the older ones) really do not know anything about theater etiquette. We ALL paid the ridiculous price to get in, don't waste our money for your simple-minded enjoyment.

    I really can't stand it. The thing that sucks is that I prefer seeing things first-run. Some film theorists argue that you can only fully comprehend the intentions of film art if viewed in the proper environment. This can't happen if some "comedian" is blabbing the whole time.

    GAH, it really grinds my gears.
     
  24. JOATRASH FX

    JOATRASH FX Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Truly one of the few justified reasons for raining in ultra-violence on unsuspecting individuals. One of the few flaws (or rather, unfortunate truths) of Darwinism is that moronic idiots at the theater don't get what's coming to them often enough.

    I really wish there were a special level of hell...
     
  25. Guri

    Guri Sr Member

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    I thought this was going to be about the nuclear radioactivity coming from Japan...

    Seriously, I think it's because there aren't enough risks being taken on new writers with new ideas.
     
  26. Flagg

    Flagg Sr Member

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    One of the best things I have seen recently was during "The Lady in Black." Some younger guy in the front of the theater kept * with his smart phone. About 40 minutes in this HUGE boooming voice from a few rows behind me yells "Hey *******! Turn off that phone!" You know what? He did and never turned it on for the rest of the movie.

    But I can also say that atleast around here, most of the people try to be polite. The Wife and I stopped by a small theater a while back and there was a large group of teens there joking around and having a good time and being rather loud. This was before the previews started. One of the girls in the group saw us looking at them making so much noise and she came over and very politely said that once the movie started they would settle down, and every one of them did. See, there is hope. :lol
     
  27. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    That might improve things in Hollywood, they already tried to bring Godzilla over. That didn't go over very well( I really liked how the original Godzilla people handled it).

    Hollywood is suffering from extreme commercialism, they do not want to take a risk on anything. Films of today would have a hard time matching B grade movies of the past.

    What's happening in streaming is the same thing that has happened with the net. It will be both good and bad, but the good will be the democratization of entertainment. That's showing it's face by the huge numbers of cable/satellite subscribers dropping their services. Why pay for 500 channels(of chrome plated ka-ka) when you only watch 3-4 channels, even then you do not watch all of the content of those channels.

    Since Amazon is asking for content from anyone. This is going to get real interesting. Since the studios have all of the old stuff locked up. Amazon is going to actively look for a new sci-fi franchise. Which means they have to look for it, so we are going to see new stuff.

    If the new stuff hits, then Hollywood will respond in kind(they will have no choice). Hollywood really hasn't faced a competitor before, sure they have been projects outside of Hollywood(most still have Hollywood connections). But nothing on the scale of what's coming. Theaters will relegated to a novelty, but not the primary means for an audience to see a movie.
     
  28. CB2001

    CB2001 Master Member

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    I also agree with this. As sad as it sounds, if Spielberg and Lucas (who are both big names nowadays because of they made movies during the Counter-Culture movement) were young and starting out today with the industry the way it is, Spielberg wouldn't even have been allowed to direct episodes of any TV show (let alone be allowed to direct Duel), and the executives at 20th Century Fox would laugh Lucas out of the office if he were pitching Star Wars to them for the first time. And the fact that they're only allowing crap in and outputting crap out (I refer back to my original post on the topic), then it's going to keep going down the drain.

    That is why the Counter-Culture movement was important to Hollywood in the late 1960s, because the studios were in the same spot as they are now. Basically, big wigs thinking that they know what the audience wants, producing utter crap and losing money because of it. I swear, what it's going to take is for one of the major names like Paramount or Universal filing for bankruptcy for the entire system to realize they need a second Counter-Culture movement and new blood that they'd have to rely on as solid storytellers to help put butts to seats once again.
     
  29. PantheraGem

    PantheraGem Sr Member

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    My late brother bought this shirt in 1991. I like to wear it to the theater. If you're a nuisance, and the long-haired bearded guy in the glow-in-the-dark Charles Manson t-shirt tells you to knock it off, you tend to listen.
    [​IMG]
     
  30. Wes R

    Wes R Legendary Member

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    To me Hollywood really died back when the studio system stopped and they stopped doing everything in house at the studio lots.
     
  31. Rotwang

    Rotwang Sr Member

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    Rising costs, Hollywood used to crank out films at a high pace at a reasonable price and while there were as many stinkers as today, most of the bad ones still made a little money and there were enough hits on average to make sure there was a steady stream. These days most major films need to make at least 200-300 million to just break even and the competition with games and other entertainment is murder. The people in Hollywood are keenly aware of this, and they are trying to get people into the cinema, trough 3D, big blockbusters, big names etc ... It's the safest way to make a film today, and even then you're not safe from going John Carter ... Hollywood is like the casino business in reverse, at least the casinos have a working formula to make money, but each new film is a high cost gamble and no amount of screening, SFX, big names and money thrown at it will guarantee a hit. The internet is a haven for indie filmmakers and a curse. The internet is so big you can literally miss out on the best things if you don't bump into them.
     
  32. CB2001

    CB2001 Master Member

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    QFT. I told my Dad this before because he's got it in his head that the film industry is like a bank and filmmakers are taking a loan from the bank, and since they are taking the loan from the studios, the studios have a right to change a production any way they want. And even though I've explained it to him like this, he still doesn't believe me. As you guys know, I went to film school and has a better understanding about filmmaking and film production than he does. It doesn't make me the end-all-be-all expert, I do admit that, but I would think that knowledge I acquired would at least be able to allow me to get the benefit of the doubt a bit.
     
  33. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    One thing I find a bit disgusting, our(US) tax dollars are flowing into Hollywood. It gives a new meaning to government cheese.

    I've heard Hollywood accounting is more creative than the movie-makers ever could be.

    I often wondered just how many flops can Hollywood produce, before a studio goes into bankruptcy. Regardless of the hits, eventually the losers will take you down. It's only a matter of time.
    I'm sure this will be much more evident, when net streaming really takes hold.
     
  34. CB2001

    CB2001 Master Member

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    Well, I don't know about how many flops, but I think that it depends on how much money you lose on a film. If you lose enough over a certain period of time, I'm sure you'd end up folding. I mean, that's what happened to Hemdale Film Corporation. After a series of flops, they ended up closing down their production facilities in order to do film distribution in hopes of saving the company. Unfortunately, they went bankrupt and their film library passed to Orion and then to MGM.
     
  35. terryr

    terryr Sr Member

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    With digital tech you may be able to make films anywhere. But the agents and producers and money men are still in hollywood. That's their castle and they won't leave. Together they have power. And power is money in their pockets.
    And crew and casts are there to find work. Even extras have a union now, because it takes experience to look natural.

    True, sometimes a great or interesting film is made low buck and hollywood buys it. Or remakes it. But low buck can also suck.
     
  36. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 Master Member

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    This, more than anything else, will be the determining factor on the day I decide I will no longer go to a theater to see a movie. I wish I could say it was all teenagers, but I've seen (or heard, to be more accurate) people of all ages sitting in the theater talking throughout the entire movie, many of them passing this rude behavior down to the children accompanying them and thinking nothing of it.

    Here's the bad news. Just yesterday a good friend told me about an article he'd read recently that stated there are groups around the country (here in the U.S., that is) that are petitioning the major theater chains to allow texting during movie screenings. Apparently these inconsiderate imbeciles can't be without their precious cell phones for the duration of a single movie, and they're attempting to coerce theater owners into allowing this behavior. Particularly teens, who like to text their friends at home and in adjoining theaters so they can review whatever movie they're seeing "on the fly". So far none of the theater chains have given in, but if they see enough of a decline in ticket sales, particularly in the target audience groups...well, we've all heard the phrase "money talks". Truly pathetic.
     
  37. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    This is what I'm saying. The whole castle Hollywood has built over the years is in serious danger. With such power comes the old saying, "Pride goith before a fall". People can loose money and power, especially if you assume that your the only person that can do something. Creativity is a curious beast, no matter how creative you are. There is always somebody better, that can do more with less. Put a union in the way, and your troubles are only just beginning.

    Here is the difference the product can totally suck. But there isn't anyone in the way to police what they think is good or not. The product goes directly to the audience they will choose what they want to see. Which was my original point, which is Hollywood loosing it's dominance(but in many ways lost it years ago).
     
  38. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    Well when is this revolution of quality in the hands of everyone going to start. I have yet to see an indepentantly produced movie or TV show beat out a Hollywood production.

    Because digital media has come far enough that all the smarmy folks who glibly say "it had no story.", now is your chance to show us your stuff.

    Well here is your digital revolution. Wow us.

    Fact is it still takes Hollywood to make a really good movie with enough mass appeal to rise to the top.

    Digital media production is a tool, that's all.

    So far all we have gotten is a lot of quantity and little quality.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  39. tcsmit29

    tcsmit29 Well-Known Member

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    There are good points in every post of this thread. In regards to the crap in crap out idea, I say that they are primarily motivated by money. When people quit watching the crap they will make something else. Bottom line is all that matters.

    Same holds true for reality TV. It is a trend that everyone has jumped on. Why? Because we all watch it. I hear lots of complaints about what crap reality TV is. I've made the comments myself. However, I will admit that I do have a thing for "Cake Boss". Love that show. When the shows are no longer successful, they will be cancelled.

    We all * about hollywood movies and then go and watch them. I am going to see Avengers tonight. Yeah it is a mindless Hollywood explosion fest movie. But they play up to my weakness. I just have to see my favorite comic characters brought to life on the big screen. Tomorrow I will complain about spending 50 bucks. They don't care. My 50 bucks is on the way to their bank account. :facepalm:darnkids:cry
     
  40. Commander Max

    Commander Max Sr Member

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    Here is an example of what we have been talking about.
    http://www.therpf.com/f11/space-command-clipper-build-147242/

    Space Command | Facebook

    I'm sure there are other projects in the works. If these guys are public, I'm sure there is a dozen more we are not going to hear about for a while.

    One thing about the streaming market, it's going to take a while to sort itself out. Projects are going to be at all levels, but it's going to take some time to ramp up.

    Like I said before, the stuff that's coming is going to make the time after Star Wars look like nothing happened.
     
  41. dkaniel

    dkaniel Sr Member

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    I still prefer to see the majority of my movies during Matinee Showings on a weekday. If I had all the Home Theater Equipment at home, the experience wouldn't be the same for me. There are movies that my family likes to see together, but there are movies that I like to see by myself because the family has no interest in seeing them. Trying to watch a movie at home is a bigger distraction than when I'm watching it in a theater. Of course my viewpoint and experience may be in the minority and on the decline. Getting out of the house to go see a movie helps me to unwind.
     

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