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Star Trek TOS captain's chair, was it real?

Discussion in 'Production Made Costumes and Props' started by exetor999, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Being a newbie here, I am amazed at the amount of information that you guys have on this site. That is why I wanted to bring up this discussion here, because someone here may know the truth.
    On another site there was a discussion about the TOS captain's chair that was sold for 300,000.00, which showed pictures of the chair at auction. Some
    people were saying that it was fake, and would never sell, etc. but nobody had any proof of it being real or not.
    The center chair looked exactly like the one on the show, but from what I have seen here, you guys can reproduce just about anything, exactly like the original.
    My point here is that the arms of the chair that was sold, where the captain has push buttons on the right hand, and rocker switchs on the left hand, on the chair that was sold, there are no holes on either right or left sides.
    According to the person selling it on auction, there were no modifications made to the chair, and the inside looked pretty real to me, but I just don't know.
    I know that the push buttons that Kirk pushed, had about 1/2 inch below the surface of the arm, and the rocker switchs did about the same, so there would have to be holes cut there.
    And in at least one episode, I remember Kirk pulling one of those square recording disks out of the slot behind the push buttons, and there is no hole for that either.
    So, I took the position that the chair was fake.

    What do you guys think?
     
  2. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    I will tell you that I believe the chair is the real thing, I live up here in Seattle and have seen the chair up close, I know the curator at the museum and we have talked about it. The chair was modified many times as the seasons went on so the button configuration changes throughout the series. When it was acquired after filming the buttons on the right hand side (your left) were missing and it was filled in by the then owner-not Paul Allen. I am quite sure if Paul had it restored it would have been a lot closer to the condition it was on TOS. He is displaying it as is. The B9 however he had restored because it was literally falling apart.

    ***On a side note I am the proud owner of the screen-used TOS style Captain's chair from DS9 episode "Trials and Tribble-ations" now! We picked it up last year when the person who bought it at the Christie's auction sold it through Prop Store of London...
     
  3. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Well, when the chair was being auctioned, it claimed that there were no modifications done to this chair, at all, ever. Everyone knows that any modification on a classic prop or set piece would be like putting bondo on a classic Corvette, it is just not done.
    This was supposed to be the original chair, but there was no sign of the hole that was made for the flexineck viewscreen that Pike had on his captains chair, I looked inside the right hand arm piece, and there was no hole, or any sign of there ever having been a hole.
    That was what set me off right from the beginning.
    And why would someone putty up only some of the holes, and not all of the holes?
    Just doesnt make sense.
     
  4. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Bob Justman, Gene Roddenberry and I think Matt Jeffries signed off on the Chair being the real deal.

    Bob and Matts word I will take Gene forget it! :lol

    Initially I thought it was fake but without seeing it in person I can't really be for sure
     
  5. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Well, I did see it in person, that was what I was wondering about. I didn't get just a quick look inside, from the back, and I noticed how pristine the wood was inside. Matt didn't sign off on it, and Gene was long passed away by the time of the auction. Bob Justman didn't have anything to do with the sets, per se, so I wouldn't trust anything that he would have to say.
    But the inside of the chair did look old, but almost TOO old, like it had been made to look that way. And the photo that I saw of the inside right side of the arm, showed two clear bulbs, with the housings. But if Kirk was to push the first 'intercom' button, and the light next to it lights up, then the entire row of lights would light up. Those 5 or 6 lights would have to have their own separate lights, in housings to keep them from lighting up the whole inside of the right side arm. There is no reason for these two lights to be there.
    And, if you don't see any holes, or putty remains inside of the chair, then it cannot be the original.
    Wish I knew how to post pictures here, so you can see what I mean
     
  6. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Interesting, I thought Gene had told the Original owner that the the chair was real way before the auction but I am probably mistaken, hell I thought Matt signed off on it too.

    Bob Justman saw the chair enough times on the set so that is why his opinion holds a lot of weight.

    Regardless a fun topic to discuss I'm surprised few have commented

    You know what would be really ineresting is to see what John Dwyer thinks about it.




     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  7. Treadwell

    Treadwell Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    As I recall the switched out button panel was indeed mentioned in the auction.

    As for authentication, I think a well-made replica would've easily fooled both Roddenberry and Justman. How closely would they have examined a prop chair back in the day? They spent 95% of their time in production offices, not pouring over set pieces.

    That said, I was more or less satisfied by the auction description that it was real. Not that I would really know...
     
  8. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Granted but some people vigoursly defended Justman stating his back ground in Law Enforcement.




     
  9. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    Here is the original auction description:


    Command Chair and platform from the "U.S.S. Enterprise". The original Captain’s Chair from the bridge of the legendary starship, U.S.S. Enterprise. Constructed at the Desilu Culver Studios in November of 1964, this world-renowned chair was first used by actor Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike in the first pilot, The Cage and remained the focal point of the bridge throughout the entire series as Captain James T. Kirk’s seat of command.
    The original design for the bridge was the responsibility of Art Director Pato Guzman and Set Designer Walter “Matt” Jefferies (after the first pilot, Jefferies became the Art Director throughout the entire series). Although construction of the Enterprise sets was an orchestrated team effort, Special Effects Supervisor Jim Rugg and Matt Jefferies were the two primary personnel involved in its design and construction.

    The outer block-frame of the chair is crafted from plywood and painted battleship grey in color. The wide-spaced armrests contain the controls and switches used by Capt. Kirk to engage various functions of the starship. Set within the frame is the original Naugahyde-covered seat with stained wooden armrests. Of particular note, the distinctive pattern in a section of the wood grain perfectly matches the same section in a publicity still taken from the second pilot — in essence, a true “fingerprint” which positively identifies this piece as the one and only command chair.

    The chair is mounted to a spring-loaded swivel on the wooden pedestal base, which centers the chair after the Captain rises to either the left or right side. The rectangular base of the chair is covered in the original Ozite® carpet of the bridge!

    The left arm control panel and switches remain as they appeared on the final episode, Turnabout Intruder. [More than once, the crew changed the composition and layout of the control panels as dictated by the plot]. In a space beneath the panel are mounted four ceramic 25-watt light sockets surrounded with tinfoil to protect the surrounding wood from the heat. Mounted into the base of the chair is a power cord wired to the sockets and, when powered, would illuminate the colored epoxy resin buttons and switches (one of the epoxy resin “lights” is missing). On the right arm control panel, the owner reinstalled the original five white-button control unit.

    The base of the chair is 42 in. wide x 35 in. deep, and stands 9 1/4 in. tall. The chair itself is 39 in. wide (from arm to arm), with a 25 3/4 in. tall backrest. The seat of the chair is 14 in. from the floor of the base.

    The current owner picked up the chair and accompanying set pieces (Lots 176-183) in 1969 after he received a call from a friend who worked at Paramount Pictures, alerting him to the fact that the entire Star Trek set was being scrapped and that if he was interested, he was welcome to get whatever items he wanted before they were thrown away. That same day in 1969, the owner picked up the chair and the other bridge set pieces offered here. They have remained in his possession since that time.

    The command chair is accompanied by the following letters of authenticity:

    This chair was thoroughly scrutinized by Star Trek Art Director, Walter “Matt” Jefferies, who examined the components and the methods used in its construction. Mr. Jefferies certifies that it is the original chair that he helped design and build.

    Original Star Trek Producer Bob Justman states after his examination of the chair, “I have no doubt that this chair is the real thing, the one and only original ‘Star Trek’ series Captain’s chair from the bridge of the ‘U.S.S. Enterprise’…”

    Vice-President, Programs & Production, Desilu Studios and Executive In-Charge of Production of Star Trek, Herbert F. Solow states, “My skepticism vanished when I saw and examined the chair. It is the real thing, a combination of 1960’s wood metal, wires, bulbs, plastic, paint and Naugahyde that sat in its special place on the bridge of the ‘USS Enterprise’ and was a major part of the production of our groundbreaking television series.”

    Marc Hurd, Director, Technical Operations, Technical and Production Operations, CBS Television City, Los Angeles, assisted his personal friend and colleague (the owner) in picking up the Captain’s chair from the Star Trek set at Paramount Pictures before it was thrown away, and states that it has remained in his possession since 1969. He continues by stating, “Without hesitation and with absolute certainty, I certify that this chair, now being offered for auction by Profiles in History, is the one and only Captain’s chair from the Star Trek USS Enterprise Bridge set.”

    The command chair is visible in literally every single episode and is, without question, one of the most important discoveries in the history of television memorabilia. The provenance is indisputable. In addition, this chair is 100% original from top to bottom with only one minor alteration to the arm panel.

    A true icon of entertainment history, this command chair also stands as a symbol of Star Trek’s influence on modern pop culture and real-life space exploration, and is arguably the most recognizable chair in the world.

    This item will be sold in a live auction at the specified time by the auction house.



    Preview is open by appointment only at our Beverly Hills offices, weekdays from Monday, June 17, 2002 through Tuesday, June 25, 2002 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Please call (310) 859-7701 to schedule an appointment.
     
  10. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thanks Sci-Fi.

    I got Matt, Gene, and Bob confused with Matt, Gene, and Herb! :lol
     
  11. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    No problem. I just posted it so we can all examine it.
     
  12. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    I examined the chair at Profiles.

    Despite some of the stories I've heard over the years. I believed it to be real.

    There were details inside that I would find hard to believe would have thought of to be duplicated.

    The only discernable change in the controls during the series came just before the episode Courtmartial.

    They changed the right side domes from all green, and one button to 5 buttons and five domes. Three domes to match the "ejecting the pod" controls needed in that episode.

    They remained that way until the end of the show.

    I also knew a guy who claimed to have seen the "arms" pulled off the chair at UCLA.

    Whether that was the controls or the wooden arms is a mystery.

    The "chair" itself is a real chair, a Madison, and could have been replaced easily.

    IF anything there is original it's the "cradle" that holds the Madison and the left side front light panel with the 3 domes and 6 wedges.

    I'd bet that is what is left.
     
  13. Xenophon1

    Xenophon1 Member

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    I don't really understand the skepticism. The chair has a clear provenance beginning with a senior studio operations official; it has been authenticated by a person who designed and built it and by at least two other senior production members who would have seen it frequently for years; the woodgrain matches period photos; and, the chair didn't stand on its own but instead was put forward with at least 6 other production artifacts retrieved from the set. What more do people want, a forensic buttprint analysis? :lol

    The chair did receive minor modifications over the years of production, which I suppose is a source of skepticism. But in addition to all the documentation and authenticating statements, we have a natural woodgrain which can be compared to high-resolution publicity photographs. This is basically a fingerprint, unique and a practical impossibility to fake if the period photographs capture enough detail and the woodgrain can be examined in person.
     
  14. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    If there are such high-res comparisons, then Hallelujah!!!!

    It doesn't help that the people that have wrangled it in recent years never seem to be able to assemble it right.

    The Madison needs to sit farther back in the cradle so the front of the Madison arms create a gray triangle on the inside of the side consoles.

    Most of the time they just jam the thing in there and let it stick out the front.

    Shameful. I tried to tell them at the Museum, but they know everything apparently.
     
  15. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    You don't huh?!?

    Two words for you.

    Mark English.

    Go look it up and come back an tell me we shouldn't always be skeptical.
     
  16. Xenophon1

    Xenophon1 Member

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    This piece has complete provenance from the studio set to the present. Bringing up Mark English here is about as relevant as bringing him up in a discussion of the authenticity of the items that came directly from Jefferies, or of Gerrold's tribble collection. :lol The whole reason so many Mark English fakes circulate(d) as real was lack of provenance--which this item has, in addition to numerous testimonials directly from senior production members, and unique woodgrain which can be compared to vintage photos.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  17. CessnaDriver

    CessnaDriver Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The base carpet has a famous coffee stain doesn't it?
     
  18. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    Sure, sure. Still, always a little skeptical of someone trying to sell something.

    It's not an indictment of falsehood. Just caution.
     
  19. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    I never thought of that, Treadwell, but you are right, most of the producers would have been in offices, and not on the sets.

    Two more pieces of information.

    After the auction, Matt Jefferies stated that he did NOT examine the chair at all.

    And, also after the auction, I was visiting a friend on the Paramount lot, told him of this situation, he then took me to see a very old man in the 'property' dept, with tables and chairs. This man, who's name was "Wes" something (I forgot), said that he was working there in the late 60's and early 70's, remembers the famous Star Trek chair being dismantled with axes and pry bars. He had a clear memory of it, but said that there was no middle chair, just the outside arms, base and pedistal.

    When my friend, Pete and I got an appointment to see the chair, we were not shown any "provenance"
    at all, but were told that the 'owner' would tell us the history of the chair, if we were the top bidder.

    Here are some pictures of what I am talking about.

    [​IMG]
    as you can see, the push buttons are in the wrong spot, no slot for the memory square thingy, and no hole for the lights, next to the push buttons.

    [​IMG]
    here you can see the rocker switches on top, and giant screwin lights below the lighted panels in front of the rockers. which would mean that the whole area would be lighted.


    Now, I'm not an expert by any means, but some of these facts seem very strange, and I was starting to wonder about this. Also, notice how every piece of information seems to hide who the owner of the chair was, at the time of the auction? stranger and stranger.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  20. Xenophon1

    Xenophon1 Member

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    Can you point me to a reference for that? And if it's accurate, perhaps he means he examined photos and reference material pertaining to the chair rather than examining the chair in person. I find it hard to believe that PiH would explicitly state:

    "This chair was thoroughly scrutinized by Star Trek Art Director, Walter “Matt” Jefferies, who examined the components and the methods used in its construction. Mr. Jefferies certifies that it is the original chair that he helped design and build."

    if there were no truth in it. That's a very specific thing to say, not a general claim.

    This is exactly where healthy skepticism should come into play. In the case of the chair, there's support for its authenticity in the form of all the things enumerated above which to my mind at least satisfy reasonable skepticism. What support is there for the story of an unnamed random person which some other random person says he met at Paramount 30 years after the fact? There's nothing there to satisfy any reasonable skepticism.

    I too find it strange. Strange that random unnamed people who claim they saw something 30+ years ago are given more credence than Matt Jefferies, Bob Justman, Herb Solow, and the CBS Technical Operations Director Marc Hurd who states that he and a friend personally removed the chair from the studio and that this is the same chair. Strange indeed. :lol

    About that nothing at all is strange--it's standard procedure at all auction houses. Unless the value of an item derives from it having come directly from a particular person's estate, auction houses never state the name of consignors (or buyers, for that matter). Why would they? If you had something like this to consign for auction, would you want your name made public so that random people could come out of the woodwork bothering you to ask if you had anything else to sell, or looking you up to ask questions, or chewing you out with claims that you faked the item? I wouldn't want that. No, I'd remain anonymous. That's normal SOP, not strange at all.
     
  21. Xenophon1

    Xenophon1 Member

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    We were told in the very auction description that this panel was reinstalled by the owner (which presumes that the panels on that arm had been removed by production to cannibalize parts, or by someone seeking a souvenir after the show wrapped), so none of this is surprising. If this chair were fake, why not fake it better and more completely? Surely someone who could source/fabricate the other panels present could have done the same for the parts you mention are so obviously missing/different? The panels on the other arm were altered throughout production, so it's not surprising to find those lamps there, either.
     
  22. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    You can see if you look around the edge of the left arm that a larger rectangle shape where something was filled in...where the original controls went.
     
  23. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Actually, that was a personal conversation that I had with Matt Jefferies, shortly before his death. He knew nothing of the sale, but I guess you could also say that the meds he was taking for the cancer could have clouded his mind. And, as far as any documentation for the chair was concerned, and keeping the 'owner' secret, it wouldn't be the first time that an auction house padded an auction, nor would it be the first time that PiH had a problem with some of their auctions, even trek auctions. I recall several being pulled at the last minute due to replica props being sold as original.
    As for this "Wes" gentleman at the studio, I had happened to believe him, he wasn't foggy on his details, and remembered everything clearly. I could tell that he wasn't just making it up. But then, I guess that someone could have gotten all the dismembered pieces together, and repaired them.
     
  24. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I have been collecting Trek TOS since 1976 and as Mike pointed out mark English who fooled even greg jein when dealing with Trek TOS you HAVE to be skeptical or you can get burned REAL fast!

    As far as the Wood grain so what all that tells me is that the original madison still exists the rest could be fake.

    This still remains very controversial among TOS Collectors that I know and looks like it is still enjoying a healthy debate here.

     
  25. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    There is NO way the colored eight switch panel shown in this photo is original to the chair. It could be an original set of switches used elsewhere. But no way it's from the Chair. Wrong bezel.

    Find me a pic with that thick bezel on the Chair and I'll kiss you.
     
  26. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Not to strange really when you consider What he had and how he got it.

    I myself when I first heard of this was suprised the Mount did'nt try to reclaim it.



     
  27. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :lol Like PIH has never been duped before or pulled Auctions! :lol

    Who is to say Matt was up to snuff when he examined the chair?

    Time does terrible things to the mind believe me I know! :D

    Look at some of the last questions that were asked of Wah , he did not remember a lot of things



     
  28. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    As I had said, Matt stated to me, that he knew nothing of the sale of this chair, which goes directly against what PiH stated in their auction. And, he seemed pretty lucid to me at the time. I have seen several auctions from PiH that I had my doubts about, considering that most of the replica junk that went into 'Planet Hollywood' allegedly came from them. AND Planet Hollywood maintained that all of their displays were original, including the Enterprise-A in Vegas that I know Greg Jein had made for them! He had told me how he got in trouble with 'the Mount' because of making copies, that one specifically.
     
  29. Xenophon1

    Xenophon1 Member

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    What Planet Hollywood does is irrelevant when discussing PiH--or would you want your own actions to be judged based on what others do? As for you stating that Matt Jefferies didn't know anything about the chair PiH stated he authenticated, basically what you're doing is implying that PiH outright lied about a piece and stated it had specific authentication from a specific individual which it did not. So please, let's not be covert about it: is that what you are alleging here?

    As for your story, where is your proof that you talked with Matt Jefferies about the chair? I'm guessing you have none. Where is your proof that he denied authenticating it? I'm guessing you have none. Since the poor man was probably close to his death at the time, even if we take the above for granted and assume you're telling the truth (an assumption which you're unwilling to extend to PiH, so why should we extend it to you?), how can we assume he was more lucid and aware and mentally competent at that moment than he was when asked by PiH to authenticate the chair?

    All you're offering here is a standard conspiracy theory, sans proof of any sort. Why would we believe that PiH was outright lying, but that you are telling the truth? Occam's razor, my friend.

    As for PiH, we all know that they've sold some forged and misattributed items in the past--every auction company has. These represent a tiny fraction of the literally many tens of thousands of items which they've probably sold since the captain's chair. I don't have any figures, but based on the sheer volume of artifacts they've handled in the last decade or so forgeries are doubtless less than 1% of what they've handled. As someone who's consigned items to PiH and other major houses in the past, I can tell you that PiH's authentication process is as thorough as anyone's in the business. They don't want to sell fakes--no one does, because it harms buyer confidence--but every auction house gets fooled occasionally. That's life: nobody is perfect, and the bad guys sometimes win.

    As for the captain's chair specifically: beyond standard conspiracy theory stuff lacking all proof, we have no reason to believe it's anything other than authentic. Unless you can provide proof that PiH is lying about what specific individuals say, we know that the item (or pictures and information about it) was examined by Matt Jefferies, Bob Justman, and Herb Solow, and deemed by them authentic (documentation of this would have been given to the auction winner by PiH, so why would they lie knowing the winner would expect documentation for these claims?). We know that the Technical Operations Director of CBS Television City states that he and a friend removed this item from the set after production wrapped. We know without a doubt that at least the Madison chair at the heart of the item is unquestionably authentic, because the woodgrain matches high-res publicity photos. We know that the materials and construction of the rest of the chair are consistent with the period and with studio construction standards. And IMHO even the panel alterations speak to the authenticity of the item because if you're capable of faking the rest so well, why not just fake the complete chair instead of stating that panels were missing and what was still present was reinstalled by the owner? Are you telling me that in 30+ years the owner couldn't source or fabricate the right parts to complete such an expert forgery, if that's what everything but the Madison is? With the balance of all of that evidence, we have every reason to believe the item is authentic.

    Now, let's look at the counterbalancing scale: what evidence is there of the chair's inauthenticity? We have...vague stories from third parties that someone somewhere whose identity we don't know claims he saw the chair dismantled 30+ years ago. Very good evidence, that. We have a claim with no corroboration at all that Matt Jefferies didn't know anything about the sale of the chair he was said to have authenticated--and even if we accept that that claim is true, which without evidence we should not, then we know Jefferies was 80+ years old and near death so why can he be counted on to remember anything about it? And even if we discount Jefferies' authentication, we still have all the other evidence outlined in the previous paragraph.

    Basically we're left with evidence of authenticity vs. a proofless conspiracy theory of inauthenticity. I sure know which side of the scale I think weighs more...
     
  30. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. I believe the same thing. Unless there is some proof that it isn't authentic...like someone comes out of the woodwork and says "No it isn't, I have the actual chair (or parts from it)"...which for that much money-they would-or just to say Paul Allen was ripped off-then we have to assume it is the real deal. Like I said I have taken a good look at it and believe it is the chair.

    I own the second best TOS Captain's chair IMO and have taken an interest in that prop, I know the guys at the EMP and have gone out to dinner and discussed all kinds of sci-fi with them including the chair. I still believe it is what they say it is. Everyone is entitled to their opinion and for some it will always be an prop x-file no matter what anyone says.
     
  31. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Didn't mean to start a war, xeno, not at all. However, by your own position, we would HAVE to accept that the chair is 10000000% real, since there is no proof to the contrary.
    And, by that same reasoning, there is no PROOF that Jesus ever walked the Earth. None whatsoever, nor Noah, nor Moses, any of them. No proof that anything in the bible ever took place, just some vague historical points here and there.
    We can be a bunch of ostriches, and jam our heads in the sand when we see something that we cannot handle, or we can question and probe.
    I am willing to go into a court of law and testify to the FACT of the conversation between Matt and myself, and his widow Mary will back me up. I'm sure that we could track down this "wes" person to tell his story, in court as well. What would it prove?
    NOTHING.
    Even if Rod Roddenberry himself got up and said that the chair was a fake, I doubt that you would believe him, since he had nothing to do with the original production, and wasn't even born at that time, so his opinion would be moot as well.
    So, end of topic. Let this thread die a horrible death.
    Silent and cold.
     
  32. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Nothing wrong with a little healthy debate exetor.

    You have your opinion and Xeno has his.

    Some new stuff has been discussed here and that's a good thing.

    I would have loved to have met Matt! :thumbsup
     
  33. bsj1701

    bsj1701 Active Member

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    Congratulations on owning this!
     
  34. SciFiMuseum

    SciFiMuseum Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! We love it, it came with a section of the bridge railing used in the episode as well.
     
  35. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Well, I am pleased to know that I am not the only one who thinks that this chair auction was bogus!
    Yes, Matt was a great person, I loved talking with him, and also Fred Phillips. They were both really friendly and down to Earth people, not big headed or egotisical at all. I also liked visiting with Lynwood Dunn, who took
    over the effects about halfway thru the second season. He had a ton of mattes from the show, at his house, along with a ton of models and set pieces that really belonged in a museum somewhere (God, I sound like Indy)
    It was really great getting to know all three of them, I will treasure that experince all of my life.
     
  36. Apollo

    Apollo Legendary Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Being an old Cameraman, I would have loved to talked to Dunn.

    One of the true old school Masters of his Art.

    I was fortunate to talk with Fred Phillips and he was another Great in his field.

    They don't make them like those two anymore


     
  37. exetor999

    exetor999 Member

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    Yes, I was surprised to find out that Lynwood Dunn had created, and had a copyright on a new process for bluescreen matts, or something like that. I'm not really up on the tech side of film making, but he did get a academy award for new technical processing back in the fifties, I think it was. I saw his name on the internet about 10-12 years ago, and was surprised that he never told me about his award. I was one of about 20 people, mostly film studuents that he wanted to straighten out his collections. I wanted to just get pictures of some of the matt paintings, and wanted to scan some of the artwork and memos, but he would not allow any of that. He got sick and died before any work could be done. Now, all that stuff was possibly sold to a private collector, who will never let it see the light of day, either that, or the studio picked up all the matt paintings, and destroyed them, as they have done with so much art.

    sad, very sad.
     
  38. Mike Paugh

    Mike Paugh New Member

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    To quote Han, "it's true, all of it".

    I recently had some face time with this in Seattle without glass in the way. The filled holes are there, for both the gooseneck viewer, M5 and other holes for who knows what. There is also internal damage consistent with the use of pry bars to remove souvenirs taken home by the crew. The original push button set up from the chair has been found and the story of the person who has been holding it matches up well with what's been mentioned here.

    Of course I have no names to support provenance or chain of ownership but you should check out the story at TOSGraphics.com
     
  39. Irishman

    Irishman New Member

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  40. alensatemybuick

    alensatemybuick Jr Member

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    I recall seeing that somewhere once before, perhaps a few years back, and thinking it sure could have been the inspiration for "the conn".

    As for the chair Paul Allen currently owns, I never had any doubt as to its authenticity. I think it was busted up after the show was canceled and the long-time owner (up to 2003) did his best to repair it. I can appreciate Paul Allen's desire not to mess with it further. If someone wants an exact replica, they can always build (or buy) one!

    That said, it would be something if the right side control panel that has recently popped up were reunited with the chair, though if I owned it, Mr,. Allen would have to buy me a vacation home on Hawaii for me to part with it.:)
     
  41. Mike Paugh

    Mike Paugh New Member

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    Hello Alensatemybuick, it was nice to chat with you at the EMP a few months ago.

    I get Mr Allen's take on it but I have to disagree with his position. They just restored the filming model of the Enterprise and it was an effort done with love and care. And in someway he contradicted himself by allowing the missing parts, panels and lights to be "placed" on the helm/nav console. They aren't permanent but they made it a beautiful thing to look at rather than a discarded shell. And old paintings get restored all the time (as do classic cars).

    Setting in place a missing comm speaker grill and a set of "domes" mounted on a piece of black plexiglass next to the correct but improperly spaced buttons on the right hand side, as well as setting one missing "dome" in the spot on the left hand side would do no damage but would improve the look.

    I'm really pleased that the museum made the effort to display the two pieces (plus the Burke chair!) together once again. They did a fantastic job on the entire display but these items alone are worth the trip to see.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2016
  42. alensatemybuick

    alensatemybuick Jr Member

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    92
    Thanks, Mike, was good seeing you as well. The "restored" navigation console was indeed a real treat to see; I used quotation marks because it was done in such a way that it looked original, patina and all. I guess Mr. Allen's logic in restoring that piece and not the chair was the fact that it was much farther gone (with many missing details). I do like your suggestion regarding the right side arm though.
     

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