Scribe/etch wide lines in styrene?

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Supe

New Member
Does anyone have any suggestions as to how to neatly scribe thick lines in styrene? I am working on a prop replica that has a number of thin lines which are not an issue, but then there are several areas with much thicker/wider detail lines that I just can't get right (see photo). I have tried scribing in multiple passes using a carbine scribe, an awl, using a rotary bit with a template to butt up against, but nothing comes out wide or clean enough. Any suggestions before I just cut out a hole and make a separate "insert" piece glued to a backing? Thanks in advance!

Styrene.jpg
 

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Riceball

Master Member
I'd say some kind of router, but you could probably improvise with a drill or Dremel held in some sort of clamp so that it's vertical with the bit pointing straight down. A drill press would probably work to if there's someway to keep at it a fixed height.
 

Supe

New Member
If you had access to a 3d resin printer, you could easily design a plate that you can glue on.

TazMan2000

I could do it in PLA, but I'm almost positive the original prop is styrene, and I figured there had to be a more obvious solution as this is from one of those "get 'er done" kind of props.
 

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tsenecal

Active Member
you can buy chisel style blades for an x-acto, and then file them to whatever shape you need, in addition, you can shape a brass plate that you can use as a brace/template to keep the x-acto from gouging the wrong spot.
 

Pedro

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Various companies make tiny chisels, they're commonly used on mecha model kits, use them like scribers. Back in my Gundam days I often struggled with this kind of thing, and ended up sharpening the ends of those tiny flat head screwdrivers to use as chisels. The action is kind of opposite though, they don't work well "chisel style" and are more of a pull/scrape tool, but work well.
 

Supe

New Member
Various companies make tiny chisels, they're commonly used on mecha model kits, use them like scribers. Back in my Gundam days I often struggled with this kind of thing, and ended up sharpening the ends of those tiny flat head screwdrivers to use as chisels. The action is kind of opposite though, they don't work well "chisel style" and are more of a pull/scrape tool, but work well.
Thanks. I definitely see them working better as a "pull". I've actually contemplated grinding and putting an edge on a paint can lid opener and seeing how it works.
 

Pedro

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I imagine that would work fine. :) That said, I think a set of chisels on AliExpress is only around $20-30...
 

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