Putty, what can be used to fill in gaps?

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by amish, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. amish

    amish Sr Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I am a novice when it comes to building models and I have one question. When building plastic models, what different things can I use as putty to fill in gaps?

    Any help is appreciated, I am looking for any solution you may have from the store bought to the home made.

    Thanks..

    Tom
     
  2. combatser

    combatser New Member

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    I would suggest useing Squadron "green" putty. You can get it at almost any hobby store that has model supplies. It goes on smooth, dries fast, and sands really nice. It only costs about $5 and will last you for quite a while.
     
  3. BlindSquirrel

    BlindSquirrel Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I used squadron putty for many years but it does shrink when drying. Especially if you have a large gap to fill plan on 4 to 5 rounds of putty and sanding.

    I mostly use Apoxie 2-part epoxy putty now. You can get it at any mail order taxidermy supply house for about $12. This stuff is great. Mix the two halves and you get a sticky putty that can be troweled into the cracks and can be smothed with water. When dry (4 hours) it is ROCK hard but can still be sanded, carved or drilled. Best of all it doesn't give off nasty fumes.

    It is also a great scuplting medium if you need to add or reshape parts of the kit.
     
  4. amish

    amish Sr Member

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    Thanks guys. I have to go quite far to get to a hobby shop, so I am looking for alternatives.

    If anyone else has anything, please let me know.

    Thanks.
    Tom
     
  5. BB43MAN

    BB43MAN Well-Known Member

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    I'm building an old AMT Star Trek Enterprise now in a modified version from a screen pic I got off of Sci-Fi Meshes and I'm using Bondo brand glazing putty for the nacelles and around the dish modifications.

    However, Bondo won't fill large gaps. For that I use superglue (thick) or some shredded styrene smeared with Testors glue. You can also use superglue with baking soda with some good results. Also for some aircraft kit applications you can use White-Out correction fluid. I also like Squadron Green putty. Some folks don't but I do.

    It all depends on how big the gap you need to fill. :D Hope this helps.
     
  6. star-art

    star-art Sr Member

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    You can get good results with a variety of things, but the pros use 2-part (A+B mixed) filler for large gaps and air-dry spot lacquer-based spot putty for filling in minor scratches and final smoothing. The stuff you get from an auto body shop is best, stuff you get from hobby outlets is, shall we say, "watered down."

    Bondo can shrink if you're not careful. But a polyester 2-part filler like Evercoat Spot Lite or Euro Soft is the best of the best. For spot cleanup, NitroStan touch-up putty is well respected and also DFL1 Spot Putty by PPG which is what I use. long-time pros tell me it is the best and does not shrink.

    Wear a respirator, this stuff is noxious.
     
  7. BlindSquirrel

    BlindSquirrel Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I forgot about this...

    I dropped some styrene scaps into a baby food jar of lacquer thinner and it melts into a a thick paste. It's good for areas where you need to scribe lines over the gap....the line will look the same.

    This mixture can take a few days to dry, though. It is a cheap alternative.
     
  8. amish

    amish Sr Member

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    Wow, fantastic stuff. Thank you all very much.
     
  9. Watson

    Watson Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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  10. NEOGELION

    NEOGELION New Member

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    You can also use wood putty to fill seams. You can smooth it on with your fingers using water to get a smooth coat.
     
  11. Jedi Dade

    Jedi Dade Sr Member

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    It really depends on the "gap" being filled for me. for seam lines I like to use sandable primer. I just lay a bead on the seam, let it dry, then sand it smooth. for very small actual gaps in a seem I would try thick CA glue, allow to dry throughly then sand smooth, for larger gaps I like glazing putty. It was developed for fixing small ding in automotive painting Its basically a tube of body filler. After applying it "glazes" (at which point you should stop messing with it), and after completely drying sands pretty easily and leaves a nice finish. available at most automotive supply places in the auto body/paint aisle, usually fotr around $2-3.

    Jedi Dade
     
  12. Lynn TXP 0369

    Lynn TXP 0369 Sr Member

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    Totally agree..

    I just got this stuff and it is amazing.

    I wish I got it sooner. I used to use Milliput (fine grade), then Wonder putty, now this.
    It is the best I have ever used...
    Can't go wrong.

    Lynn
     
  13. Less than Super Ostrich

    Less than Super Ostrich Well-Known Member

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    I would also agree that Aves Apoxie Sculpt is the best. Remember to get the solvent with the apoxie since it really helps to soften the putty (more than straight water) and helps remove it from your tools.

    Order it from starshipmodeler.com... good people there. Great customer service and a good price.

    For a quick fix, I think Bondo Glazing Putty is better than the Squadron Putty. And you can get it cheap from Walmart, Ace Hardware, or any car part shop.
     
  14. F1_error

    F1_error New Member

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    For smaller areas, that won't need much sanding, you can smooth in some Plasticine clay and top it off with super glue. Works a treat on miniatures.
     

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