My First Scratch-built & Kit-bashed Spaceship Model - What Now?

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b1tw1ze

New Member
Hi Everyone :)

Inspired by "Adam Savage's One Day Builds: Kit-Bashing and Scratch-Building!" YouTube video, I decided to try some scratch-building & kit-bashing...
  • What do you guys think? (It's my first modelling of any kind, but feel free to be brutally honest! It would be nice to see what more experienced modellers see.)
  • What are my options now? I was expecting (hoping) to feel a little more "satisfied" at this stage of the build... But it's looking a bit uniform and grey... How do I make it look a little more "natural" / give it a little "character" at this point? Would some simple weathering help here? (E.g.: adding a some black and taking it off with a rag?)
  • Can anyone recommend any tutorials, tips, equipment that really upped your scratch-building game?

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(Loosely) inspired by the Atlantic Class Heavy Cruiser from the Traveller RPG by Jennell Jaquays (formerly Paul Jaquays)
IMG from (Atlantic class Heavy Cruiser - Traveller)
Atlantic_Heavy_Cruiser.jpg


Alex.
 

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Madhatter

Well-Known Member
Looks fantastic for a first scratch build.
In response to point 2, you can mask off some panels and spray them a lighter or darker shade of base colour for variation. Then add a wash of highly thinned dark grey or black paint to accent the raised panels.
At the risk of sounding lazy, a Google search of starship weathering techniques will bring you a plethora of ideas that could help inspire or help you there
 

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joberg

Master Member
Well, it`s kind of difficult to say, since the model is from a Bande Dessinée. You`ve respected the look for sure and it`s a great first attempt.
Now, you could take some artistic liberties with it and put a few more details (kit greeblies) on top of some of the surfaces and do a very light wash over those to get the details to pop-up ;)
 

b1tw1ze

New Member
Do you have any more pictures of your build? Are there any more reference pictures to show more sides of this ship?
I took a few pictures as I was building.

There seemed to be really limited reference material with pretty much everything I could find here: Atlantic class Heavy Cruiser - Traveller

I didn't even see the "schematic view" until near the end of the build. (At which point I was too excited to "finish" :lol:)

I wasn't too worried about a 100% accurate reproduction this time. I was really just excited to try out the tools, materials & techniques.

The underside is really bare and I generally feel I could have used a lot more greebles throughout as per joberg's comment. I only had one cheap model kit for greebles (Tamiya's 1/700 HMS Rodney) and it didn't come with many parts. I was also scared about "overdoing it". I also wasn't too worried as I imagined mounting it in the angle from the reference picture, so thought you probably wouldn't really see the underside anyway.

I keep telling myself I'll go back and do this "properly" at some point with much more attention to detail & scale etc...

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b1tw1ze

New Member
Looks good, looks like something that would fit right in in the Stargate universe.
Thank-you. :)

I love the Stargate universe! and will definitely attempt to make some props from the series. I really like the aesthetic of the stargate spaceships and Stargate props in general. I remember looking at builds of the Zat'nik'tel ages ago... I think that's something I would really like to have.
 

Michael Bergeron

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Looks great so far, especially for a first time! I wouldn't worry about added greeblies for this first build, especially if you don't have much to pick from. While super common nowadays and certainly the preference for folks who build stuff for the Star Wars universe this actually reminds me of a style more common in earlier sci-fi. This could 100% be a ship from earlier Doctor Who for instance.

As for making it less uniform, a wash would certainly do that. But what I would do first is spray it a colour different from primer grey, then use slightly shades for different panels/areas of the ship. You could even introduce some colour or markings on the ship. Then give the whole thing a quick seal with clearcoat and a wash.

Experimentation is the key, then when you're done, build another model. :)
 

b1tw1ze

New Member
Looks fantastic for a first scratch build.
In response to point 2, you can mask off some panels and spray them a lighter or darker shade of base colour for variation. Then add a wash of highly thinned dark grey or black paint to accent the raised panels.
At the risk of sounding lazy, a Google search of starship weathering techniques will bring you a plethora of ideas that could help inspire or help you there
That's very kind of you thank-you :)

Thanks for the tip, I'll buy some paints and give it a go. I'll also spend some time googling and see what else I can learn.

I looked at your Revell Venator build and nearly cried xD... My mind was blown by your dedication and exquisite attention to detail... I don't think I'll ever be at that level, but I had fun gluing some styrene together for a few hours! :lol:
 

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b1tw1ze

New Member
Looks great so far, especially for a first time! I wouldn't worry about added greeblies for this first build, especially if you don't have much to pick from. While super common nowadays and certainly the preference for folks who build stuff for the Star Wars universe this actually reminds me of a style more common in earlier sci-fi. This could 100% be a ship from earlier Doctor Who for instance.

As for making it less uniform, a wash would certainly do that. But what I would do first is spray it a colour different from primer grey, then use slightly shades for different panels/areas of the ship. You could even introduce some colour or markings on the ship. Then give the whole thing a quick seal with clearcoat and a wash.

Experimentation is the key, then when you're done, build another model. :)
Thank-you :)

Madhatter suggested a similar thing. I'll give it a go! It sounds "simple enough" but I can't wait to see how badly it can go wrong! :lol:

I'm definitely excited by the thought of making another prop/model build.
 

stevielewis

Well-Known Member
The suggestions from others here are something to go by. It's your build so you can do it up any way you like. And when you finish (which is up to you) then try another scratch build, or try building a kit. In the end you are the only person you are building for. Good luck with finishing this first build. Post pictures as well. (y):)
 

joberg

Master Member
When you scratch-build you'll have to look for different greeblies not necessarily found in kits. Example: innards from computers, laptops are great and specially the keyboard; under each key (that you can also use) there's flat greeblies you can use! Make-up tubes, plastic door stoppers, printers, fax machine, radios, plastic straws, etc...the list is too long to post here, but you get the picture ;)
This is your first one...good, now look at another project and make it better. As Picasso said to the question: "What's your best work?" Answer: " The next one"(y)
 

rbeach84

Sr Member
Although it takes more patience, having a 'test pig' to experiment with surface finishes can certainly help avoid gaffs when working. Also, the experiments (plural) can help you settle on a recipe of paint and techiques that work well together. Even taking your selection of paints and making a 'dab card' on plastic sheet can help you understand your paint 'tools'.
Why? Nothing more aggravating than having a hard won model goobered up by a paint job that went sideways... voice of experience there, mate!
Keep up the good work, scratchbuilding is a challenge that satisfies at many levels.
Cheers!
Robert
 

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b1tw1ze

New Member
Although it takes more patience, having a 'test pig' to experiment with surface finishes can certainly help avoid gaffs when working. Also, the experiments (plural) can help you settle on a recipe of paint and techiques that work well together. Even taking your selection of paints and making a 'dab card' on plastic sheet can help you understand your paint 'tools'.
Why? Nothing more aggravating than having a hard won model goobered up by a paint job that went sideways... voice of experience there, mate!
Keep up the good work, scratchbuilding is a challenge that satisfies at many levels.
Cheers!
Robert
Thank-you! and Thanks for the tips (y)

I have a cheap airbrush and some basic colours arriving tomorrow. Hopefully get a chance to try out some painting this weekend!
 

Jedi Dade

Master Member
OK - first - that is awesome!

Where to go from here? Its kind of up to you... If it were me I'd pencil in some panel lines, and shade some of the panels "slightly" kind of like a Star Destroyer. Or you could go for total color and make it a "heavily repaired" ship painting various parts different colors. Again "if it were me" I'd add small greeblies to the gun turrets and scattered about the ship to give some of the shapes the look of machinery... maybe a bit of piping. But honestly - its totally up to you - its YOUR CREATION.

Jedi Dade
 

Couchdivot

New Member
Nice looking model. It's easy to be a critic but much more difficult to open up to criticism. You've already had the advice about various painting techniques, scribing/building panel lines, and adding greeblies. As for me, when I design/build a ship or project, I fall back on the old principle "form follows function." You don't see an actual piece of equipment anywhere that has extraneous pieces for no purpose-even the gigantic fins on late fifties Cadillacs had an aesthetic objective. Different universes and different cultures have different sensibilities - use those inspirations as a guide to determine your path.
 

swgeek

Sr Member
Can't really add anything that hasn't already been said, but just want to say for a first scratch build this looks great!
 

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