Filler - What do you use?

TazMan2000

Master Member
I used a lot of different fillers. The old Squadron stuff was the worst. I went to Tamiya, and noticed with it's solvent and thin texture, it sands with perfect feathered edges that is absolutely unnoticeable with paint applied. The trouble is, is that the stuff shrinks a LOT, so you have to re-apply and re-sand if you have a larger depression. Apoxie Sculpt was good when you have huge depressions to fill, but the stuff (can't remember if it was part A or B) dries up quickly. Plus its a PIA to mix 2 parts together every time you need something filled. While the stuff is good for filling, it doesn't stick worth sh!t.

Squadron has a newer version of it's White Putty out, and it is cheaper than the Tamiya stuff. Soft enough to sand easily and you still can get a perfect flat surface with minimal sanding, which works well if you don't want to get rid of detail.

TazMan2000
 

JediMichael

Master Member
I used a lot of different fillers. The old Squadron stuff was the worst. I went to Tamiya, and noticed with it's solvent and thin texture, it sands with perfect feathered edges that is absolutely unnoticeable with paint applied. The trouble is, is that the stuff shrinks a LOT, so you have to re-apply and re-sand if you have a larger depression. Apoxie Sculpt was good when you have huge depressions to fill, but the stuff (can't remember if it was part A or B) dries up quickly. Plus its a PIA to mix 2 parts together every time you need something filled. While the stuff is good for filling, it doesn't stick worth sh!t.

Squadron has a newer version of it's White Putty out, and it is cheaper than the Tamiya stuff. Soft enough to sand easily and you still can get a perfect flat surface with minimal sanding, which works well if you don't want to get rid of detail.

TazMan2000
I found that after mixing the apoxie sculpt (which was a pain) that tapping my fingers in water a little and then working it into the spot helped to stick a bit better.
 

Bauble

Well-Known Member
I use Milliputt white superfine. A UK product that I have to custom ship into the States! It fills well, doesn’t shrink and has a slow curing time. About 4 hours. While soft, you can smooth it with water. It works a bit like clay. It fills joints and bonds them well. The bond is so strong compared to Tamiya filler, which has little structural bonding strength. If you need the joint to hold really well, you can also drop ca glue on the cured epoxy and then sand it down. Both milliputt and ca glue sand well. They are tougher than other fillers, so you need to sand twice as long. But I like that because I have more control this way. The joints on my 3 foot hammerhead and blockade runner use this combo extensively. A few of these joints are holding up 1 foot structures without additional reinforcements. That is how strong they can be. You can also see that they sand smooth.

I tend to use ca without baking soda or curing agent. Just wait 1 hour for full cure and it sands really well without ‘roughness’ from the baking soda. You just have to be patient. :)
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
I found that after mixing the apoxie sculpt (which was a pain) that tapping my fingers in water a little and then working it into the spot helped to stick a bit better.

Yeah. But what a hassle to mix the 2 parts together, then add water or whatever. I just want simplicity. Squeeze from tube, apply, let dry, sand and paint. You couldn't blend the stuff in to the plastic easily. There was always a visible edge, like drywall mudding done by an amateur.

TazMan2000
 

PHArchivist

Master Member
I used a lot of different fillers. The old Squadron stuff was the worst. I went to Tamiya, and noticed with it's solvent and thin texture, it sands with perfect feathered edges that is absolutely unnoticeable with paint applied. The trouble is, is that the stuff shrinks a LOT, so you have to re-apply and re-sand if you have a larger depression. Apoxie Sculpt was good when you have huge depressions to fill, but the stuff (can't remember if it was part A or B) dries up quickly. Plus its a PIA to mix 2 parts together every time you need something filled. While the stuff is good for filling, it doesn't stick worth sh!t.

Squadron has a newer version of it's White Putty out, and it is cheaper than the Tamiya stuff. Soft enough to sand easily and you still can get a perfect flat surface with minimal sanding, which works well if you don't want to get rid of detail.

TazMan2000

On the wood filler, it feathers amazingly well too (sheesh - sounds like I work for DAP or Elmers!)...

Apoxie Sculpt - if I remember right - can be a bitch to sand, and I ran into the "drying up" issue as well.
 

PHArchivist

Master Member
Here ya go - a look at sanding / feathering... (yes - am aware I obliterated my phaser banks!)

And this is a relatively heavy grit too - 220 I think:
 

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TazMan2000

Master Member
I should mention that the Squadron White Putty dries quickly...which is perfect for impatient guys like me.

I've tried wood putty as a filler on 3d prints, and it was OK when it stuck. Different brands might have different results, so I may try Elmer's in the future,

TazMan2000
 

PHArchivist

Master Member
I should mention that the Squadron White Putty dries quickly...which is perfect for impatient guys like me.

I've tried wood putty as a filler on 3d prints, and it was OK when it stuck. Different brands might have different results, so I may try Elmer's in the future,

TazMan2000
Good point...

It does stick to cleaned, raw styrene, but primered surfaces are better...
 

Hovinski

New Member
For large tasks like filling huge gaps and holes in helmets for example, I use fiberglass putty from the automotive department because it leaves a certain durability and can be bent to a certain degree. I have made the experience of rigid Bondo pieces simply falling out of the helmet because the helmet was made from vinyl that bent and the Bondo did not and the two just didn't stick together very well.

For smaller stuff like models or the finishing touch on helmets I swear on Mr. Surfacer. I've got the jars with just the liquid for pin reparations, put on with a cotton bud or toothpick or, if you prefer, it can be applied with an airbrush. It also comes in rattle cans in several fine degrees. It levels itself out to a nice, smooth surface, closes fine gaps by itself and can very easily been sanded. I think it would be perfect with your container, using sanding sticks. It's supposed to be used on very small model kits so it's perfect for detail work and fine gaps. I have no idea what it's made from but it smells and behaves almost like liquid plastic. It smells bad so mind to have a good ventilation if you try to use it!
 
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