Filler - What do you use?

TheMurph

New Member
I'm struggling to find a good filler and/or how to use it effectively.

I'm trying to work out how to fill gaps in styrene on corners, seems and whatnot but the automotive fillers always seem so much harder than the styrene to the point you can barely sand it and milliput seems hard to get to go in the smaller thin cracks.

I'm in the UK so can't really get bondo that I have seen, what do you guys use and any filling tips?
 

JPH

Sr Member
contour putty if small. Tamaya

Free Form Air by Smooth-on is great. Mix equal parts of both products and they harden. Easy to sculpt, sands easily.

Rapid Fill from Prop Monkey Studio.

Wood filler that you get at a hardware store
 

Sluis Van Shipyards

Legendary Member
I was going to say Bondo spot filler... Another thing you could try (test it first) is any kind of modelling putty and then smooth it down with acetone. For very thin cracks or pin holes Mr. Surfacer works really well. I love the Bondo spot filler so much I would actually say to try and find some that's not too expensive and have it shipped. It's the best putty I've used.
 

robn1

Master Member
The Isopon brand of car body products in the UK must have something similar to the Bondo spot putty.

For outer corners I prefer something that won't crack off so easily. I cut up little bits from the kit sprue and glue it in place, let it sit a few seconds then press it down. The melted plastic will squeeze out and fill the gaps, let it dry then file/sand it to shape. You can make near invisible repairs this way that are the same hardness as the styrene.
 

PoopaPapaPalps

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Apoxie Sculpt is my go-to for any spot filling and fixing. With a little 91% isopropyl alcohol, you can cut down your work by half just smoothing and blending it before it cures hard. Otherwise, with styrene, CA glue with some cornstarch (and some accelerant) makes a great sticky slip that cures quick and sands and blends really nice once you get the hang of it.
 
Last edited:

JediMichael

Master Member
As others have said, Apoxie Sculpt and Tamiya putty have both worked good for me.

20220101_230849.jpg
 

Jaitea

Master Member
I’m in U.K., I use different methods for different situations, I use Isopon P38 (same as US Bondo) for resin builds, nice & strong, best to do as much clean up with a blade as soon as it sets…the resin is still soft…so if you have drips or streaks left whilst spreading it onto the model, it’s easier to scalpel off those bits now…when it’s completely set, I sand & polish

For standard styrene kits, I use Perfect Plastic Putty….

1641127431268.jpeg

It’s water soluble so if there’s a seam that you need to fill, just fill it up with this, then go over the filler with a baby wipe….done…no need to sand etc….you can reactivate it with water…or if you want to make it so you can’t reactivate it, put a spot of superglue on it

I also use from time to time just ordinary fine polyfilla, it’s water soluble & can also be sealed with superglue

John
 

TheMurph

New Member
Thanks for all of your tips guys, I have found Bondo spot filler here in the UK so shall be trying that along with the Tamiya paste for now. I'll keep an eye out for Isopon P38 and the perfect plastic putty, can't justify ordering it all at once!
 

JPH

Sr Member
Thanks for all of your tips guys, I have found Bondo spot filler here in the UK so shall be trying that along with the Tamiya paste for now. I'll keep an eye out for Isopon P38 and the perfect plastic putty, can't justify ordering it all at once!
any chance of pics to show what you are working on?

Know what I mean, Squire? Say no more

Photos, no less. Wuhhhhh

 

PHArchivist

Master Member
Elmer's wood filler.

No ****.

Don't complicate life. It's cheap, easy, hold's paint beautifully, and sands like a dream.

Seriously.
 

TheMurph

New Member
any chance of pics to show what you are working on?

Know what I mean, Squire? Say no more

Photos, no less. Wuhhhhh


Currently my main effort is on my new shop I have made out of two outdoor toilets by removing the separating wall, finished off putting lights in and a top on a basic bench I made today:

WhatsApp Image 2022-01-03 at 16.20.57.jpeg




But the main thing that's prompted the filler questions is trying to save a model of the 'Belter breaching pod' from the expanse:

WhatsApp Image 2022-01-03 at 16.19.11.jpeg


WhatsApp Image 2022-01-03 at 16.19.11 (1).jpeg


I've messed up and put some dodgey filler on it, then further messed up by sanding it too soon and am left with the above image on parts of it.

I reckon I can save it yet and then just have some "free weathering" it's meant to be a used smashed up shipping container after all!

any advice from anyone would be appreciated, should probably have led with the images in the first place to be honest.
 

JPH

Sr Member
Thanks!

I am actually a fan of XTC 3D for that kind of stuff, paint multiple thin layers and it will fill in.

When it starts to look good, paint it in a totally different color and your eyes will pick up additional blemishes
 

Attachments

  • 20211126_070321.jpg
    20211126_070321.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 50
  • 20211204_200831.jpg
    20211204_200831.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 50
  • 20220103_125522.jpg
    20220103_125522.jpg
    3.2 MB · Views: 48

PHArchivist

Master Member
Interesting, I have some of that. Do you find in binds to stuff like styrene alright?
Not necessarily; no...

Consider it purely as a filler, not a binder, per se.

It is not robust enough to withstand or support stress, but as a simply filler (imaging nacelle seams on a TOS Enterprise), its beautiful...
 

Duncanator

Sr Member
Evercoat body filler is a good alternative to Bondo. I find it spreads smoother than Bondo - like the particles are ground finer.

They make several formulas, some of which are very runny, and others that are thicker.
 

HackinSpock

Well-Known Member
One thing to note amongst all these recommendations, I'd recommend using one that isn't as toxic. I use bondo all the time, but know that its super toxic, especially when sanded down. Otherwise, the other options listed here are good as well. From one degree to the next
 

PHArchivist

Master Member
On the wood filler...

I've used Elmer's, but realized it is DAP I'm using now.

Not good for structural integrity, but with simple gap filling, its a dream.

Sands about the same as styrene; slightly easier...
 

PHArchivist

Master Member
Forgot to mention that it plays well with primer too.

I use almost exclusively Rust-oleum sandable auto primer, and the DAP product adheres to it beautifully.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
Top