Dulling glossy resin parts?

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ShowCraft

Well-Known Member
When casting in RTV, instead of sanding, is there something I can apply to glassy smooth resin parts that will dull them before priming?
 

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REL

Sr Member
Try wiping them with rubbing alcohol or lacquer thinner. That worked for me, by accident.
 

ShowCraft

Well-Known Member
Try wiping them with rubbing alcohol or lacquer thinner. That worked for me, by accident.
My problem is only with Smoothon 300 resin with their RTV rubber and spray can mold release. The parts come out with an indestructible glossy sheen. I'v tried thinners, strippers, alcohol, gasoline, every strong chemical I could find around the house. Even swimming pool acid. Nothing works.

Thought there might be a product I didnt know about.
 

robn1

Master Member
Try dusting the mold with baby powder. This will make the resin flow better, and give the part a nice matte texture.
 

ShowCraft

Well-Known Member
Try dusting the mold with baby powder. This will make the resin flow better, and give the part a nice matte texture.
I usually use a powder. I was wondering if the parts could be dulled afterward by application of a chemical without powdering the molds.
 

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robn1

Master Member
Most resins are designed to resist chemicals. I don't know what else you could do besides sanding it. Maybe self etching primer?
 

blip

Sr Member
Did you know that car paint shops sell a very fine steel wool that can be used instead of sandpaper. Very quick to key up the surface of any complicated shape. It comes in various grades.
 

MonsieurTox

Master Member
Apply your primer inside your RTV molds then pour your resin. The resin will bond strongly to the paint (and the details will be sharper).
 

vismus

Active Member
I've found that once resin parts are flat primed, they will be flat when finished painted with flats. I do use alternating enamels and acylic method: base colors enamel and weathering and rusting, acrylic.

Tommie
 

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