Battlestar Galactica movie?

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ShadowX81

Well-Known Member
Ive never seen the original, but I loved Moore's reimagining (atleast I did until the last season where the show dropped the simple human drama and drowned itself in its own bloated and confusing mythology).

It just seems way too soon for a remake. Say what you want about remakes but atleast they waited a quarter century before creating the new series. But Moore's series has been off the air for only a couple years and its already time for a new franchise?
 

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Nwerke

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Ummm because there are a TON of old school fans who think that new Series was a poorly written, lazily done, abomination.

Really? Lazy? Mr Pot, meet Mr Kettle. :lol Lucas won his lawsuit against the producers, IIRC.

But Moore's series has been off the air for only a couple years and its already time for a new franchise?

Agree. This is going to cause confusion and audience expectations will be all over the place. And as Blade Runner, or The Fifth Element demonstrated, audiences just love it when they get something that doesn't match their preconceptions.
 

JD

Master Member
Ummm because there are a TON of old school fans who think that new Series was a poorly written, lazily done, abomination.
A TON!?!? :confused :lol

Sure, There's a small group of "old school fans" and an even smaller group of vocal "old school fans" who didn't like the the new series.

What's very true is that the new series was very highly lauded in the press. The series won the very prestigious Peabody Award and was named Time magazine's Best television programs.

From the wiki page:
Throughout its run, the series earned critical acclaim from Time, National Review, Rolling Stone, Newsday, The New York Times, The New Yorker, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Chicago Tribune, and Entertainment Weekly.

Diane Werts of Newsday wrote: "You can look at this saga any way you want—as political drama, religious debate, psychological suspenser, sci-fi adventure, deep metaphor or just plain fun—and it's scintillating from every angle." Robert Bianco of USA Today commented: "Driven by violence and rage, Galactica is perhaps the darkest space opera American TV has ever produced. In Galactica's future, humans are on the run, and if external enemies don't get us, internal divisions will... You'll understand them [the characters], their conflicts and their desires, because they're recognizable humans in all their glorious complexity. And that's what makes Galactica a great TV series."[42] Peter Suderman of National Review stated that the series is "arguably the most potent, dramatically vibrant series on television. ...t packs the power of a gut punch on screen. For that, much credit is due to the immensely compelling cast of characters... Battlestar Galactica burns with a combustive mixture of political turmoil and human drama that is as achingly real and relevant as anything on television.Jeff Jensen of Entertainment Weekly wrote that the show "has distinguished itself as one of television's very best dramas — on a par with 24, The Wire, and Lost — because it so utterly transcends both its genre and its source material. ...[The] series' sophisticated stories have also attracted a distinctively new breed of fan, one who's not necessarily a sci-fi buff."

Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times praises the show's ability to "anchor fantasy with vivid and recognizable human psychology" and declares that the series is "not just a cult hit but a significant piece of television." Maureen Ryan of the Chicago Tribune describes it as a "sprawling, enthralling tale of human survival" that is "full of political allegories and fascinating, multifaceted characters." She finds, "Like Deadwood, Battlestar Galactica is interested in exploring how a society on the edge decides to govern itself. What rights and actions are sacrosanct, which are outlawed, when most of the human race is eliminated? ... Thanks to a stellar cast and brave writing, Battlestar soars." Throughout its run, the series has often surprised reviewers with its many twists and turns. Ryan comments: "There’s nothing like a good Battlestar plot twist to make your head spin, but the “holy cow” moments aren’t the main point (though they’re one heck of a tasty side dish). The show and its twists and turns are grounded in deep curiosity about human nature, and how contradictory and confounding it can be."

Matt Soergel of The Florida Times-Union states: "Its propulsive and complex storytelling is matched by, at best, just a handful of theatrical movies a year." Tim Goodman of the San Francisco Chronicle opines, "Battlestar Galactica transcends the sci-fi genre; it competes, creatively, on the same level as any other top-tier drama." Mark Perigard of the Boston Herald states: "A drama this gripping comes ’round rarely."[52] James Poniewozik of Time Magazine named it one of the 100 best TV shows of all time. Time magazine also wrote in the spring of 2005 that the new show was one of the six best drama programs on television. It would proclaim the program the best show on television in December of the same year. Television Without Pity describes Battlestar Galactica as "one of the finest, most beautifully written, expertly acted shows on television."[54] Alan Sepinwall of The Star-Ledger writes: "[W]hat makes Galactica so gripping is its emphasis on character over hardware. The explosions and the killer robots are cool, but they don't stack up to seeing fully-drawn people - brought to life by a great writing staff led by producer Ron Moore and an astonishing cast led by Edward James Olmos and Mary McDonnell - grapple with these life-or-death, genocide-level decisions." Joshua Alston of Newsweek declares that the show "captures better than any other TV drama of the past eight years the fear, uncertainty and moral ambiguity of the post-9/11 world" and "always finds ways to challenge the audience's beliefs."

The series also draws praise for having many strong and complex female characters. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer's Melanie McFarland notes, "[Starbuck], played with a tomboyish swagger by Katee Sackhoff, is fast becoming the latest in a long line of feminist television icons."
The series has also received favorable reviews from other writers. Stephen King wrote, "This is a beautifully written show, driven by character rather than effects...but the effects are damn good. And there's not a better acting troupe at work on television." Joss Whedon commented: "I think it's so passionate, textured, complex, subversive and challenging that it dwarfs everything on TV."
You can try to downplay the reception to the new BSG series from a loud-but-small group. But, facts are facts... the series was at the very least a critical success. ... and that from professionals, not a bunch of fanboys pissed off that there's no daggit named Muffet. Heck, even Richard Hatch came around.
 

JD

Master Member
Which one? TOS and the new one are not in the same universe.
Interesting point. While on a first read it sure seems to imply he's refering to the new series - but, if you really read it it's kind of ambiguous as to what series the movie could fit into.
 

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Skalen Fehl

Well-Known Member
Just finished watching the entire series again. What a gritty, visceral, dark and yet triumphant allegorical epic! I am so glad I decided to give it a chance when I first saw it.
 

Apollo

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
:lol You are going to have to do alot better then blowing smoke up my wazoo by saying the Series was critically acclaimed by the press! :lol

I watched the whole Series when it was on and actually enjoyed some Seasons of it.

The last ones were horrible and I thought they squandered their opportunity.

As far as Richard Hatch they brought him in to try and get the TOS fans to the show.

At least he got thrown a bone. :lol


A TON!?!? :confused :lol

Sure, There's a small group of "old school fans" and an even smaller group of vocal "old school fans" who didn't like the the new series.

What's very true is that the new series was very highly lauded in the press. The series won the very prestigious Peabody Award and was named Time magazine's Best television programs.
 

ShadowX81

Well-Known Member
The last ones were horrible and I thought they squandered their opportunity..
Im right there with you. While I liked the 3rd season (I actually thought it was better than the 2nd), I apsolutly hated the last one. By the middle of it, I honestly had no clue who was on who's side. Im sure some people will claim that is was makes it engaging and deep, but for me it just became impossible to follow.

I still have no idea at all how Starbuck's corpse and Viper ended up on earth.
 
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In My Opinion,..That's MY OPINION(not claiming to be an expert ,etc And to those who do enjoy the New show, Good for you:thumbsup...)The re-imagined series lost its nobility.. and the people,the male characters were so over the top flawed, emasculated, and indecisive that I often lost suspension of disbelief while watching.


To be blunt, the male characters in “re-imagined” are so overly feminized and flawed that, in spite of good acting performances by the actors, after a while I just stopped liking them and certainly did not admire them. The “culture” of “re-imagined” was all wrong.The Female characters, on the other hand, were tough as nails and man enough to show it.

Perhaps “re-imagined” was meant to be a reflection of today’s flawed pop culture rather than an example of the best of our own. While the eye candy “re-imagined” was inspiring,(I do love the Ships!!) the story sub plots were less and less so and at times smacked of a bad soap opera.

I was pushing myself to watch it and as the second season went onto the third I just couldn’t watch it any more.

Glen Larson, Galactica's creator, hated the New series and was very vocal about it. He even blocked the over rated Ron Moore from Producing a Movie of his version(Ron Moore), of the show.

I hope that Glen Larson does his legacy justice with this new film and creates something that is more philosophically deep rather than psychologically in need of a good therapist.


Just another 2 cents!!!
 
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JD

Master Member
I loved the new series and I watched the old series first run and still have an appreciation for it - although it is very, very dated and campy (something I didn't realize back in the late 70s).

Yes, the new series had flaws. The first part of the last season lost a bit of the magic - especially while aboard the "submarine" ship. The mutiny could've been amazing and it had some moments but fell a bit flat. But, hey - we had episodes like Black Market and The Woman King long before season 4 came along.

But, I absolutely loved the final episodes - this was TV at its best. Even with its flaws, this was the closest I've seen to perfect television.

But, overly feminized? Not sure where that came from - not something I see at all. Deeply flawed? Yeah, you take people - even soldiers - in a situation where their homes, families and billions of people were destroyed and yes, you will see flaws and characters that will change radically. I saw the flaws in both male and female characters alike and I saw both sexes treated fairly equally.

But, it's not like they made a pitstop at the Casino planet. :lol

From what I recall, Larson had a few beefs with the show... one of which was that he was not given credit (which was changed). I can't find much else to back up his other issues, but I recall Larson wasn't enthused that the Mormon themes he incorporated into the original show weren't featured in the new show, nor was the new show as family friendly.
 

TheStig

Well-Known Member
To be blunt, the male characters in “re-imagined” are so overly feminized and flawed that, in spite of good acting performances by the actors, after a while I just stopped liking them and certainly did not admire them. The “culture” of “re-imagined” was all wrong.The Female characters, on the other hand, were tough as nails and man enough to show it.

I don't even know what you mean by this. The closest I can think of is the male characters showing emotions, which does happen. I know Adama cried on the show when he found out the truth about his best friend. A man he had known and trusted like a brother for decades. I'd be upset too.


Perhaps “re-imagined” was meant to be a reflection of today’s flawed pop culture rather than an example of the best of our own.

New BSG was meant to be us, the human race, warts and all. They were extremely flawed and made terrible decisions at times. But sometimes they rose to the occasion and did some amazing things.
 

Skalen Fehl

Well-Known Member
New BSG was meant to be us, the human race, warts and all. They were extremely flawed and made terrible decisions at times. But sometimes they rose to the occasion and did some amazing things.

You see people who reached breaking points in times of stress and duress. Many crumbled, some snapped and some endured it well. It was, after all, the end of the world. Adama's breakdown after finding out about Saul moved me. A leader has to be strong and who really could the old man turn to? He must command respect and confidence or else all is lost. He can only turn inward. Luckily he had his son to confide in on occasion and then of course an equal--Laura Roslin.

There were still plenty of Mormon theological themes. Starbuck didn't know what she was, that is, until the very end--someone who had died and come back to life in a new body (and a new ship), a gift from the one true God. Resurrection of sorts. When her mission was finished, she simply "went on".
 

Jathoris

Well-Known Member
I enjoyed the original series and the reimagined series was frakin awesome! I may be the only one in here but I wouldn't want to see someone attempt to make it as a film. That's what we just had for a few seasons not too long ago and it was absolutely beautiful! I for one am perfectly happy with what we were just treated to and can always go back and watch the DVDs to enjoy it all over again. Guess we'll have to wait and see.
 

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JMChladek

Sr Member
Heck, that isn't hard to do. Just have actors on a set filming scenes from BSG 1978 (or a 1978 reunion movie) when the Cylon basestar that jumped away at the end of nu BSG pops in with the evolved Cylons onboard thinking they are watching "historical documents" (their memory cores are a little defective). The resulting film would be the BSG equivalent of Galaxy Quest. ;)
 

JD

Master Member
Dear Brian Singer,

Please don't.

We have the "original" series.

We have the Ron Moore series.

At this point in time, we don't need another Battlestar Galactica.

I'll be honest: The Usual Suspects is one of my favorite movies of all time. I love that movie... it's darn near perfect.

...and I love the "new" Battlestar Galactica. It is simply the best television show I've ever watched. That series entertained me like nothing else. Waiting from week to week and assinine SyFy channel season breaks.

I've seen a few of your other movies - notably X-Men, X2 and Superman Returns. There were cool moments here and there - Superman saving that airplane was just amazing. But, the rest of those three flicks I felt 'meh' about. That doesn't give me hope for your Battlestar Galactica - your recent interviews saying it could tie the old and new series... um, why? These are two great series that don't need to be tied together.

For the love of all that is good I ask: please leave Battlestar alone. Let it rest for a few years - if you have the itch in ten years, then sure - go at it. In the meantime, there are plenty of other old things you can reboot - I'd love to see Logan's Run on the big screen (again), there's Salvage One (with today's technology could be pretty cool).

The Galactica and her crew are just a little too fresh in everyone's mind still.


JD
 

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