3D Printing - Any advice welcome

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by opal1970, May 1, 2015.

  1. opal1970

    opal1970 Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    I have more or less decided to dive into the world of 3D Printers. Currently I am leaning in the direction of a Ultimaker2 Extended. According to the reviews it has a very good resolution for fine detail or very small pieces and yet has a large chamber in case I ever need to make something bigger. On their website, they say that their software is user-friendly... but then, they all say that.

    If anyone out there has a Ultimaker2 or any other 3D printer, I would welcome any thoughts or experiences on the topic.

    Thanks
     
  2. teslabe

    teslabe Active Member

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    I've had my Makerbot Rep 2 for over two years now and find it very helpful with making custom parts for my builds, My Moebius B-9 is a good example. Made the parts for the tracks
    and torso bearing, plus other parts. Now, understand none of these printers are problem free, I had to add mods to get mine to work as well as it does now, but it's well worth it in the end.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  3. opal1970

    opal1970 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your insights Teslabe. What type of mods did you add to your printer?

    Nice B9 by the way. :)
     
  4. teslabe

    teslabe Active Member

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    Thank you.... I'm at work right now, I can go into more detail tonight, enjoy your day.....
     
  5. xeno

    xeno Well-Known Member

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    I have an Ultimaker, and use Cura all the time,
    It is very easy to use, but with all software, you will have to get to know it, but with the new Ultimakers and Cura it is almost plug and play.
    if you use the standard settings you can get very nice prints in about 30 mins after opening the box :)

    Check Youtube for info on how the software works
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biCWssfil2A

    Cura is also good to make adjustments, so you can still print STL files that are not well made.

    with the standard settings you can get to know the printer and software, and how it all works, then you can switch over to the expert settings and tweak all you want.
    The Ultimaker community is very active, and Cura is continuously in development.
    On the forum questions are quickly answered, and a lot of experimenting is done with the printer and latest kinds of filaments.

    The main reason why I chose Ultimaker was for the Cura software, and the great forum.
     
  6. zenix

    zenix Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I work for www.tinkerine.com and we make really top notch printers like the DittoPro at a lower cost than Ultimaker. Check out the Make Magazine review of our machine! dpro.jpg
     
  7. opal1970

    opal1970 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Xeno, thanks. That sounds pretty good. How well does it print very small objects? I mean one thing I would like to do with it is to create multiple examples of things that in the past I would have had to do manually... most of which are fairly small, like the Galactica viper below...

    IMG_0284.jpg
     
  8. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym New Member

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    The Ultimaker is a really well made printer, and has an awesome community. I was really considering the Ultimaker 2, though I eneded up going with a Lulzbot Taz4. I went with the Taz since their customer service is top notch, printer is highly rated, up-gradable extruders, multiple materials, completely open source, has an office that is based in the U.S.,and the print volume was bigger than the Ultimaker (at that time). I believe Ultimaker is also open source, so you won't be locked into any ecosystem.

    I haven't had any catastrophic failures with my printer, and any small hiccups the customer service reps were patient and very nice. I had a power supply croak, and needed a new screw for my build platform. When I was on deadlines they would overnight me parts for free, or at a reasonable price.

    As others have said, the biggest thing to consider with any 3D printer is there will be a bit of tinkering until you get the print quality you want. And there will be missteps, prints failing, stuff popping off the build plate, lots of things that will give you extra gray hairs and wanting to throw the printer out a window. I'm a dumb dumb when it comes to electronics so I had some frustrating times here and there, and 99% of the errors are because I'm still learning about printing etc, even a year later.

    Also, be mindful of any fumes or Ultra fine particles, including PLA. ABS is the hot topic as it's made from petroleum, however PLA still gives of UFP's and even plant based, is still a melting plastic. I only mention this because I am very sensitive to things of this nature, and I've heard way too many people(mainly vendors) pushing PLA about how safe it is. Even walking around a recent 3D show here in NYC, myself and the crew of people I was with, started coughing and getting a scratchy throat, and all the vendors were running PLA.

    It's a bit more money, though if you're doing very small parts and models, check out the Form1. It's price is higher than a filament depositing printer, as it uses a laser to cure UV resin, though I think it can handle fine detail a bit better. The movement of the extruders on FDM's have a tendency to pull tiny parts off print beds. It'll take some patience, though they're incredibly fun to work with once you get settled in!

    It just comes down to what you want to do with it. Ultimaker and Lulzbot are excellent printers. I haven't used a Form1 myself, and have only seen them at shows, though it may be another avenue to explore!
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2015
  9. opal1970

    opal1970 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Zenix, thanks for the tip.

    DittoPro looks similar in specifications and price to the standard Ultimaker2, the Ultimaker has a bit better layer resolution (20 vs. 50) but the nozzel/filament diameter is somewhat smaller on the DittoPro ( .35mm / 1.75mm vs .4mm / 2.8mm).
     
  10. opal1970

    opal1970 Well-Known Member

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    "
    Thanks Pseudonym, I will certainly do a bit of research regarding Form1.

    UPDATE: I just checked out the Form1 site... wow. Pretty amazing results. I am not quite sure if it is worth the price but the resolution is certainly top rank.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2015
  11. zenix

    zenix Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    yes, form1 is a resin based printer. it depends what you want to do. parts are way stronger and cheaper on fdm style machines than resin. resin is also more finicky. dittopro has direct drive too so printing with flexible material is a lot better. also there's a 1 year warranty and full telephone support and awesome projects at u.tinkerine.com
     
  12. xeno

    xeno Well-Known Member

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    Ultimaker also has an US based office now where you can order, and gives support.
    with the small objects you want to print, it looks like you are better of with a resin based printer.
    but you could also opt for a 0.2mm nozzle instead of the 0.4 this will make finer detail but takes a lot longer with larger prints.

    resin based printers can make great detailed parts, but is a lot of maintenance and messy to work with :)
    there are some youtube vids that show the process
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8zwlbs_QvM

    One of the things Ultimaker is famous for is speed, it is one of the fastest FDM printers that can do fine details.
    this is one of the finest detail that I have printed with a 0.4 nozzle, the hand pistons were printed separate.

    [​IMG]

    But I have seen smaller, there was a miniature functional drill printed some weeks ago, that was done on a Ultimaker.
    http://www.gizmag.com/3d-printed-smallest-power-drill/36654/
     

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