2001 Monolith build

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it took a bit of effort, but I felt it was now or never...I did not know how many tires on my little trailer would be destroyed soon?
 
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Out of the garage!

I have to drag this about the distance of a football field into a woods along a curvy foot path,,,so this is going to be hard on this old retired guy...

but I like how things are sitting,,,
so I started to drag it by hand up the path.

Notice in the photo how the back set of wheels are not going to want to help at all.
They seem to think they know a different way to go?
 
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I would only yank on the trailer for about 10 feet at a time, then sit on the ground to catch my breath.

i had to constantly adjust the two trailers that were under the Monolith to keep them going in the same direction.

as I got closer to the TiPi, i knew it would be where I needed to make a sharp turn, but I was not sure how i would do this by myself.
 
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the green strip of wood is where the Monolith will be positioned.
The angle will match the prevailing winds and will have a narrow side into the wind in an effort to have less wind load hitting the larger sides.

My body tells me to take a few days off from this project.
But I believe the next thing to start thinking about is digging the holes for the 4x4s to drop into and cemented.
 
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and.....suddenly I was reminded that there is still about 5 solid feet of frost that has to warm up before any holes are to be dug....

so.....I will wrap the monolith in plastic, and I will continue this story when we pick things up with the digging next month.


when my neighbor came over, he did ask the "why?" question.
and to tell the truth, I dont have a great answer for that question.

Im not sure why I am building my version of the 2001 monolith?

and its my version too, its not even close to the measurements of the real movie prop.
So why make this?

There are so many projects on the type of Forum that try to match the screen-used prop, and here I come, with not even a slight attempt to even come in the same ball park as the 2001 prop.

so why make this?


I really should think of a good answer for people to hear and then respond to me with "Oh I get it now"

something that sounds like what a normal person would say........

And not sound like something a fool that almost gave his old body a heart attack by yanking a 16 foot wooden monster through the woods would say....
 
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When I'm all done with this project....likely in July?
Then I will post a new topic here on this forum that is just the photos of how I made a 2001 movie monolith, from start to finish.

To let the next guy who will come after me with a dream of making his own version of the monolith, just what can happen as you try to fulfill that dream...
 
You’re definitely getting a workout with this! Here’s a helpful trick I’ve used many times and it works beautifully: When setting posts, to prevent rot and insect damage (was the norm before pressure-treated wood became common) paint on tar to the areas below grade and several inches above. I’d suggest covering the entire post area that will be set into the concrete and the bottom of the monolith with a compound like Henry’s roofing tar. Additionally drilling several small vent holes at the bottom for moisture drainage, and a few on the very top (which will go unnoticed) is a good idea, as condensation and temperature expansion can occur potentially warping your beautiful creation. Hopefully, the weather works in your favor soon!
 
You’re definitely getting a workout with this! Here’s a helpful trick I’ve used many times and it works beautifully: When setting posts, to prevent rot and insect damage (was the norm before pressure-treated wood became common) paint on tar to the areas below grade and several inches above. I’d suggest covering the entire post area that will be set into the concrete and the bottom of the monolith with a compound like Henry’s roofing tar. Additionally drilling several small vent holes at the bottom for moisture drainage, and a few on the very top (which will go unnoticed) is a good idea, as condensation and temperature expansion can occur potentially warping your beautiful creation. Hopefully, the weather works in your favor soon!
ahh,,,the next issue,,,,the cement...

I have been thinking a long time about how I was going to do this, and I have been asking lots of questions of people who put up fence poles for a living.

BUT, I have also been kicking around the question of the wind tipping the whole thing over..cement or not.

The truth is, my Monolith is over 11 feet tall, but the wood 4X4s only go into the ground 4 feet????

that does not even sound like its going to work.

I need a way to do the holes for the two 4X4s and their cement, that will result in a firm base for the monolith in the wind?
and,,,,because Im an old man who is retired and lives on a fixed low income,,,,I need to find a way to do this on the cheap....to try to use things I already might have or could "find"



any ideas?
 
another question to think about:

how to top it off?

Right now the top of the Monolith is just the same type of Zip system /OSB that all the rest of it is made of.

But I was warned by a guy who made his own Monolith a few years ago, that he regrets not sealing the top with something that will last and require no repairing or upkeep.

any idea what I should do for the top?
 
This is awesome! Congrats on getting so much done so quickly -- it took me months.

I think it's totally fine that you found dimensions that work for your personal aesthetics. Using a 4 foot width makes the construction much easier.

In practice no one ever looks down on a full scale monolith. That means that you can put anything you want on the top and as long as it's shallow it won't be visible. I would seriously consider making a sheetmetal cap, perhaps with a slight roofline. Folded around the top edge and painted black it mostly won't show and it will provide protection from rain and sun.

Looking forward to seeing this completed!
 
This is awesome! Congrats on getting so much done so quickly -- it took me months.

I think it's totally fine that you found dimensions that work for your personal aesthetics. Using a 4 foot width makes the construction much easier.

In practice no one ever looks down on a full scale monolith. That means that you can put anything you want on the top and as long as it's shallow it won't be visible. I would seriously consider making a sheetmetal cap, perhaps with a slight roofline. Folded around the top edge and painted black it mostly won't show and it will provide protection from rain and sun.

Looking forward to seeing this completed!
I shall start looking for a way to get it capped !
 
ahh,,,the next issue,,,,the cement...

I have been thinking a long time about how I was going to do this, and I have been asking lots of questions of people who put up fence poles for a living.

BUT, I have also been kicking around the question of the wind tipping the whole thing over..cement or not.

The truth is, my Monolith is over 11 feet tall, but the wood 4X4s only go into the ground 4 feet????

that does not even sound like its going to work.

I need a way to do the holes for the two 4X4s and their cement, that will result in a firm base for the monolith in the wind?
and,,,,because Im an old man who is retired and lives on a fixed low income,,,,I need to find a way to do this on the cheap....to try to use things I already might have or could "find"



any ideas?
Home Depot rents gas-powered augers, which can be operated by one person (with patience). $150-200? for the day. While not cheap, it might be your best option considering the soil conditions and required hole depth. Something to consider.

Yeah, there could be an issue with the 4x4s potentially snapping in those wind speeds. It’s extra work, but you might want to consider performing some surgery here on the ‘black-box’ as you wait on warmer weather. One suggested fix would be to drill and recess several lengths of rebar for the lower half of the interior of the monolith, wired and secured to the posts, which would then extend into your footing (post hole). There should also be a few horizontal pieces of steel tied to the verticals at the bottom of the footing. Given how massive it is, as well as your wind concerns, Google ‘footing reinforcement details, images’ for ideas. It might seem like overkill, but technically you’ve built a structural column here, so looking at a few footing ideas could be helpful or inspiring. To paraphrase an old engineering adage: When in doubt, it’s always safer to go with the most restrictive design.
 
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